Types of British nationality

7. British protected person

You would have become a British protected person on 1 January 1983 if you:

  • were a citizen or national of Brunei
  • were already a British protected person
  • would otherwise have been born stateless (without a country) in the UK or an overseas territory because, when you were born, one of your parents was a British protected person

In most cases you would have lost your British protected person status if:

  • you gained any other nationality or citizenship
  • the territory you were connected with became independent and you became a citizen of that country

Rights as a British protected person

You can:

  • hold a British passport
  • get consular assistance and protection from UK diplomatic posts

However, you:

  • are subject to immigration controls and don’t have the automatic right to live or work in the UK
  • aren’t considered a UK national by the European Union (EU)

Become a British protected person

You may be able to register as a British protected person only if all the following apply:

  • you’re stateless and always have been
  • you were born in the UK or an overseas territory
  • your father or mother was a British protected person when you were born

Contact UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) if you think you might qualify as a British protected person.

British citizenship

You may be able to register as a British citizen in very limited circumstances if you meet certain conditions.