Guidance for driving examiners carrying out driving tests (DT1)

From
Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency
Updated
, see all updates

02: The motorcycle test

The guidance that driving examiners should follow when conducting the motorcycle test.

2.01: Motorcycle Minimum Test Vehicles (MTV)

The driving test regulations require a candidate to provide a suitable motorcycle for the purposes of the test. This means that the motorcycle must be roadworthy, taxed, insured and of such construction or design as to enable the examiner to properly conduct the appropriate test. The motorcycle has to be reasonably representative of type.

Speedometers must be in either mph or mph/km/h. Vehicles which have been changed mechanically from km/h to mph are acceptable for test; the face of the speedo has to show mph or mph/km/h, external overlays are not acceptable. The introduction of modular testing requires candidates to use the same sub-category of motorcycle for both modules of the practical test.

The requirements for motorcycle minimum test vehicles (MTV) are as follows: Category AM solo moped no more than 50cc and below 4kW have top design speed of no more than 28 mph (45km/h). (Since June 2003 all EC type approved mopeds have met this rule).

Note: All AM machines can be used on test unless there’s clear evidence that they don’t meet the new rules.

Category A1 solo motorcycle between 120cc and 125cc capacity with an engine power no more than 11 kilowatts (kW) - 14.6 brake horse power (bhp) and be capable of at least 55 mph (90km/h).

Note: All machines between 120 and 125 cc can be used on test unless there’s clear evidence that they don’t meet the new rules.

Category A2 solo motorcycle at least 395cc capacity with an engine power between 20kW (27bhp) and 35kW (46.6bhp) and have a power to weight ratio of no more than 0.2kW per kilogram.

Category A solo motorcycle at least 595cc capacity and have an engine power of at least 40kW (53.6 bhp).

Normally only disabled riders may use a motor-tricycle or motorcycle and side car for their test. However some 3-wheeled machines are classed as mopeds or motorcycles. These are machines which have the overall characteristics of a solo motorcycle and where the distance measured between the centre of the area of contact with the road surface of any two wheels is less than 460 millimetres they are classed as motorcycles. Providing they meet the all other MTV requirements these motorcycles can be used by any rider for their practical motorcycle tests or CBT training.

Where three wheeled motorcycles are fitted with a device or locking mechanism to prevent them from leaning or tilting this must be in the unlocked position for the manual handling exercise.

For category A2 & A DVSA will accept evidence from manufacturers or official importers that a specific model of motorcycle meets these requirements and will publish this information where it applies to a number of machines of a specific type. Examiners should refer to the most recent version of the official motorcycle MTV list - this can be found in the DT1 document library.

For machines not on this list or where an individual machine has been restricted to comply with the minimum test vehicle requirements it will be accepted for test providing certified proof of compliance or restriction is available for the examiner. This must be a certificate or on headed paper from an official source such as a main dealer, official importer or recognised specialist in restricting vehicles. Dyno certificates alone are not acceptable.

Restricted A2 machines

Proof of the restriction must be on headed notepaper, showing the registration number, from a main dealer, an official importer or a recognised specialist.

Any switchable engine control unit (ECU) or variable power restriction device must be clearly visible showing the power it’s set to (an ECU under the seat is acceptable as long as it is easily accessible). Interchangeable carburettor heads, exhaust manifold restrictors or a hidden ECU are not suitable methods of restricting a bike that can be switched between two categories but may be used as a permanent certified restriction.

A dyno test certificate will not be accepted in isolation as proof.

2.02: Automatic Transmission

Candidates may take their test on a machine fitted with automatic transmission that meets the above requirements, however on passing their test they will be restricted to riding automatic machines in the relevant sub-category.

2.03: Modular Test - General Information

The motorcycle test is in two modules. Candidates have two years from the date they passed their multiple choice and hazard perception test to complete both Module One and Module Two of the motorcycle test. (See following Paragraph for progressive access). Candidates must use the same sub category of machine for both modules of the test. The only exceptions are for candidates who pass their module one before 19 January 2013 on any 35 kW (47bhp) machine - they may carry this entitlement forward and take module two after 19 January on either a category A machine or a category A2 machine providing they meet the relevant age requirement.

Candidates must always have a valid theory test certificate before taking their first motorcycle practical test. Unless candidates take the progressive access route, they must have a valid theory test certificate before taking any further practical motorcycle tests. A confirmation letter issued by Pearsons is acceptable if the candidate has lost their theory test pass certificate. To avoid a test being terminated unnecessarily and with time permitting, examiners should contact the Examiner Hotline to verify a Theory Test pass. If Deployment can provide the required information then the test can be conducted.

If a candidate has not passed both modules within the two year period they are required to re-take and pass the theory test and to re-take and pass Module One of their motorcycle test before they may take Module Two. The 2 year period will then recommence from the date of the new theory test.

Candidates must present a valid CBT certificate when they take both Module One and Module Two of the motorcycle test. If a candidate’s CBT certificate expires they may retake it at any time.

Note: A valid Northern Ireland CBT certificate is acceptable.

2.04: Upgrading an entitlement.

Candidates who hold a full motorcycle entitlement, gained by passing both theory and practical tests, who wish to upgrade their entitlement before the 2 year progressive access period is up will have to complete both modules on the larger category machine. They will have six months from the date of passing Module One to pass Module Two. These candidates are not required to re-take their CBT certificate, but they must have a valid theory test pass certificate.

Note: A valid theory test pass certificate is not required if the candidate is just upgrading to remove restriction code 78 (restricted to vehicles with automatic transmission) on the same category of machine.

Candidates who are following the progressive access route (from 2015 onwards) will not require a CBT or theory test pass certificate. They will have six months from the date of passing Module One to pass Module Two.

2.05: Licence and entitlement checks.

Check the candidates ID as per DT1 Chapter 1, paragraph 1.11.

Note: There are changes to the format of new driving licences. New provisional driving licences just show category A start and finish dates, this encompasses all motorcycle sub categories. Therefore it is acceptable if a candidate attends for a category A1 or A2 test when their provisional driving licence shows category A.

Examiners must check a candidates entitlement carefully. This is particularly important for Module Two when the examiner must check that the sub-category of machine on the Module One pass certificate is the same as the vehicle presented for the Module Two test.

Following disqualification from riding under the Road Traffic Act, or revocation under the New Driver’s Act, all riders are required to complete CBT to validate their new provisional driving licence when it is issued. This applies in all cases, including those where the person previously held full motorcycle entitlement. A DL196 issued prior to the disqualification period is invalidated by the disqualification.

If a disqualification is shown on the driving licence, examiners should check that the date of issue on the DL196 is after the issue date of the provisional licence. If the DL196 is dated before the date of issue of the licence the test cannot be taken.

Riders who have had their licence revoked under the New Drivers Act will not have a disqualification shown on their licence, but must re-take CBT and present their CBT certificate (DL 196) at test.

If having made all appropriate checks a candidate’s entitlement cannot be established the test will not be able to proceed.

2.06: Examiner Journals

Examiner journals will be sent out by DTCS in the usual manner for all locations with fax machines. Some non DVSA Module One locations may not have access to fax machines, these will be treated as out stations. TCMs will be responsible for agreeing different arrangements, e.g. arranging to collect on the way to the centre.

2.07: Completion of DL25 MC

The top section of the DL25 MC should be completed following existing guidelines. This includes only entering the candidate’s names on the B and C copies.

The motorcycle test is in two modules and a candidate must use the same sub - category of machine for both modules. It is therefore very important that examiners ensure the licence sub-category they enter on the DL25 and the pass certificate match the motorcycle actually presented for test, not copied from the journal.

The following codes and test types should be used when completing the DL25MC:

A - Module 1 DL25 Category AM1 DL25 test type 16

A2 - Module 1 DL25 Category A2M1 DL25 test type 16

A1 - Module 1 DL25 Category A1M1 DL25 test type 16

AM - Moped Module 1 DL25 Category AMM1 DL25 test type 17

A - Module 2 DL25 Category AM2 DL25 test type 1

A2 - Module 2 DL25 Category A2M2 DL25 test type 1

A1 - Module 2 DL25 Category A1M2 DL25 test type 1

AM - Moped Module 2 DL25 Category AMM2 DL25 test type 9

If the candidate has used a machine fitted with automatic or semi-automatic transmission the relevant box on the DL25MC should be marked.

The appropriate category A, A1, A2 or AM should be entered on the DVSA12 module 1 pass certificate.

2.08: Module 1 Preliminaries

This Module begins with the normal identity and entitlement checks. The candidate is required to sign the insurance and residency declarations. The candidate must produce the following valid documents:

  • A photo card driving licence or a paper licence and current passport.
  • DL 196 CBT certificate (unless exempt)
  • Theory test pass certificate (unless exempt)

The following numbers relate to the DL25 MC:

Note: Photocopies of documents are not acceptable.

1a There is no eyesight test in Module One, this is carried out in Module Two. This box should not be used.

1b The safety and balance questions do not form part of Module One, they are included in Module Two. This box should not be used.

2 - 8 These boxes should be used to record any faults committed on the Motorcycle Manoeuvring Area. Only one fault per exercise should be recorded.

9 The speed recorded for each attempt at the avoidance and emergency stop exercises should be recorded.

10 - 11 These boxes feature on both modules.

12 - 26 Not used for Module One.

27 Faults committed during the first cornering and controlled stop exercise should be recorded here.

Result of test: Mark appropriate box.

Total Faults: Record number of faults - Five or less rider faults required to pass, more than five rider faults or one or more serious or dangerous faults will result in failure.

Route number: Enter route 88

ETA boxes: Mark as normal.

Survey boxes: Mark as normal.

Eco Safe Riding: Can assess and mark control, planning not used.

Debrief: Mark as normal.

Activity Code: Mark as normal.

Pass Certificate Number: Enter as normal

Licence Rec’d box: Always mark ‘NO’

Health declaration: Candidate to sign as normal.

2.09: Module 1 test requirements

Candidates must wear clothing that meets these minimum standards:

  • a securely fastened motorcycle helmet that meets British or EU safety standards
  • motorcycle boots that provides support and ankle protection, or sturdy trainers/shoes
  • heavy denim trousers or textile or leather motorcycle trousers
  • a heavy denim jacket with several layers underneath or textile or leather motorcycle jacket
  • motorcycle gloves

If a candidate’s clothing doesn’t meet these standards, if it’s possible, they should be given an opportunity to borrow something that is suitable; otherwise the test should be cancelled.

Note: An exemption exists for followers of the Sikh religion if they are wearing a turban instead of a safety helmet.

Start Procedure

At the completion of the document and identity checks the candidate will be asked to ride the machine to the starting position. Irrespective of where the machine is parked the test begins when the candidate first handles the machine. The candidate should be asked to ride front first into either the left or right hand bay marked by green cones as shown on a diagram. The candidate may choose either bay.

General Riding

Candidates who are unable to start their machines by normal means, and who ask if they may push start them, should be allowed to do so.

Candidates should be asked to behave as if they were riding on the public road which should include any necessary safety checks throughout the time they are on the manoeuvring area. The examiner should clearly explain the exercises to the candidate making full use of the manoeuvring board to describe the requirements, and giving precise directions as to the course to be followed. It should be explained to the candidate that they should not touch any of the marker cones during the exercises. At sites where both left and right circuits are available examiners should ensure both circuits are used equally over a period of time.

If the candidate demonstrates a dangerous standard of riding the examiner should assess if it is safe to continue with the test. If the test is terminated the examiner must ensure the test report fully supports the decision to terminate the test.

Each exercise must be assessed on completion, taking into account safety and control. No more than one fault can be recorded for each exercise.

On and Off Stand

Candidates are required to demonstrate they can take the machine on, and off the stand safely, retaining balance and control of the machine. Candidates may choose to use either the side stand or the centre stand. A machine with no stand is not suitable for the test.

The next manoeuvre (wheeling the machine) takes place before the machine is placed back on the stand.

Wheeling the Machine

Candidates are required to demonstrate they can wheel the machine safely and under control from one marked bay to another without the use of the engine. They should demonstrate effective observation during the exercise.

The candidate will be asked to wheel the machine, starting backwards, either from the left bay to the right or vice versa. They may choose to wheel the machine backwards in an arc from one bay to the other. Alternatively they may elect to wheel the machine backwards out of the first bay before pushing it forwards and then backwards into the opposing bay.

Different techniques may be employed when wheeling the machine backwards, ie the candidate may hold the bar grip with one hand and place the other on the saddle or rear of the machine, they may also elect to hold the handlebars with both hands. Either technique is acceptable providing they retain safe control over the machine. Examiners should take the size of the machine and the ability of the rider in to account when assessing any faults.

Paddling or sitting astride the machine to move it is not allowed other than by candidates with special needs, ie limited mobility, restricted leg movement. If a non-disabled candidate attempts to paddle the machine the examiner should take control of the situation and point out that the machine should be pushed.

Slalom/ Figure of Eight

Candidates are required to demonstrate their ability to ride the machine slowly and under control whilst turning in a restricted area, they should maintain balance throughout the exercise.

Effective rear observation should be taken before starting the exercise. When beginning the slalom exercise candidates may elect to ride to either side of the first marker cone. The examiner should assess the actions of the candidate in the normal way. If, for instance, the candidate loses control of the machine and puts a foot down to avoid falling, then obviously a serious fault has been committed. If on the other hand, the rider dabs a foot down with a slight loss of balance and then completes the exercise without further loss of control, the fault should be assessed as a rider fault.

If the candidate misses out a cone as a result of a loss of control then a serious fault should be assessed, if the cone is missed but the candidate’s control of the machine is correct then the examiner may elect to allow the candidate to repeat the exercise.

Candidates sometimes ride around the yellow cone (which forms the last of the slalom exercise) as they carry out the figure of eight. This in itself is not a fault unless it is a result of poor control.

The slalom exercise will normally lead straight in to the figure of eight exercise, whilst a general awareness should be demonstrated by the candidate there is no specific requirement for full direct rear observation before starting this manoeuvre. If the candidate stops at the end of the slalom exercise and then starts the figure of eight exercise safely no fault should be assessed.

Slow Ride

The candidate is required to demonstrate the ability to ride in a straight line without losing control of the machine. The candidate should take effective rear observation before starting the exercise.

The examiner should ask the candidate to ride slowly as if in slow moving traffic to the blue stopping cones. A significant loss of control, for example a total loss of balance resulting in foot down to prevent dropping the motorcycle would be assessed as a serious or dangerous fault depending on the circumstances. Slight loss of control, such as a wobble or weave may be assessed as a rider fault.

U turn

The candidate is required to demonstrate low speed balance, control and effective observation before and whilst riding a U turn within a defined restricted space.

The candidate should be asked to ride a U turn between the two marked lines, as if they were riding on a public road. The candidate should take effective rear observation. Touching but not crossing the lines should be regarded as a rider fault, crossing the lines would be assessed as a serious fault. A significant loss of control would be assessed as a serious or dangerous fault depending on the circumstances. If not already positioned correctly the four blue cones that form the controlled stopping box should be re-positioned at this stage.

Cornering and controlled stop

The candidate is required to demonstrate their ability to control the machine safely as they negotiate the bend and then brake to a controlled stop in the designated stopping area. There is no minimum speed requirement for this exercise, candidates should be asked to aim to reach a speed of between 30 - 50km/h (20 - 30mph) as they pass the speed measuring equipment before braking to a controlled stop.

The candidate should stop with the front wheel spindle inside the marker cones, stopping with the spindle in line with the cones is acceptable. Stopping well short of the cones, overshooting the stopping area completely with the front wheel spindle clearly outside the cones, would result in a serious fault being assessed. Normal assessment should apply if the candidate loses control of the machine or skids.

The candidate should then be asked to turn their machine around, taking as much space as necessary so they are in position to begin the next exercise. Examiners should be ready to move the cones out of the way if this makes the turn more convenient. The first two cones (nearest the speed measuring device) should be stacked on the second two cones ready for the subsequent exercises.

Emergency Stop

The minimum speed requirement for this exercise is 50km/h (about 32mph). Candidates are required to demonstrate their ability to stop as quickly and safely as possible whilst retaining control of their machine.

The examiner should stand in a safe position near the controlled stopping box where they can observe correct use of both brakes. As soon as the front wheel has passed the speed measuring device the examiner should give the signal to stop with their right arm. Both brakes should be used effectively, however late or no use of the rear brake could be assessed as a rider fault if the machine stops quickly and under control. Very late or ineffective use of the front brake is not acceptable even if the machine is fitted with linked brakes.

A greater stopping distance should be allowed in wet conditions.

Candidates who reach 47km/h or less will be asked to repeat the exercise providing they have not committed a serious or dangerous fault and providing their riding does not indicate it would be unsafe to continue. A rider fault will be assessed as the candidate has not achieved the minimum speed.

Candidates who fail to reach the minimum speed requirement but who achieve 48 or 49 km/h will not be asked to repeat the exercise; a rider fault will be assessed in addition to any other control or observation faults and should be recorded under item 8 ‘emergency stop’. No more than one fault can be recorded for this exercise. The examiner should record the speed of each attempt at the emergency stop exercise on the DL25MC. If the candidate commits a serious or dangerous fault during the emergency stop exercise and fails to achieve the minimum speed requirement the exercise should not be repeated. If the candidate fails to achieve the required minimum speed at both attempts a serious fault should be recorded under the appropriate heading in item 9 ‘Not Met’.

Candidates who do not pass the emergency stop exercise will not be permitted to carry out the avoidance exercise, the test will be ended at that point, the result of the test will be shown as a fail - not safe to continue (test activity code 4).

Avoidance Exercise / Controlled Stop

The minimum speed requirement for this exercise is 50km/h (about 32mph). Candidates are required to demonstrate their ability to control the machine safely whilst steering to avoid a stationary obstacle, bringing the machine to a controlled stop.

Having briefed the candidate on the exercise examiners should stand in a safe position, away from the direction the candidate is steering towards, near the blue controlled stopping box.

Candidates who reach 47km/h or less will be asked to repeat the exercise providing they have not committed a serious or dangerous fault and providing their riding does not indicate it would be unsafe to continue. A rider fault will be assessed as the candidate has not achieved the minimum speed.

Candidates who fail to reach the minimum speed requirement but who achieve 48 or 49 km/h will not be asked to repeat the exercise; a rider fault will be assessed in addition to any other control or observation faults and should be recorded under item 5 “Avoidance exercise’. No more than one fault can be recorded for this exercise. The examiner should record the speed of each attempt at the avoidance exercise on the DL25MC.

If the candidate commits a serious or dangerous fault during the avoidance exercise and fails to achieve the minimum speed requirement the exercise should not be repeated. The examiner’s assessment should be recorded normally.

If the candidate misses the speed measuring device or fails to ride through the two blue avoidance exercise cones the examiner should ascertain if the candidate fully understands the exercise.

If the examiner is confident a lack of understanding caused the candidate to miss the avoidance cones or the speed measuring device then it should not be classed as an attempt and the candidate should be allowed to repeat the exercise. If the candidate didn’t carry out the avoidance exercise and in the examiner’s opinion this was not attributable to a lack of understanding then this will be classed as an attempt, the speed should be recorded as zero on the DL25MC.

If the candidate commits a serious or dangerous fault during the avoidance exercise and fails to achieve the minimum speed requirement the exercise should not be repeated. If the candidate fails to achieve the required minimum speed at both attempts a serious fault should be recorded under the appropriate heading in item 9 ‘Not Met’.

Having carried out the avoidance manoeuvre the candidate completes the exercise by coming to a controlled stop between the two blue marker cones (the two furthest from the speed measuring device). One of the key competencies for the avoidance exercise is for the candidate to be able to return to their original riding line. Candidates should either have passed between the two blue cones or be in line to pass between them to be considered to have completed the exercise satisfactorily. Accuracy when stopping is not required for this exercise however overshooting the stopping area to a significant degree would result in a serious fault being assessed, stopping just short of the cones is acceptable providing the candidate does so under control. Normal assessment should apply if the candidate loses control of the machine or skids.

Number of rider errors

To pass module 1, candidates must commit no more than five rider faults with no serious or dangerous faults.

2.10: Candidates with Special Needs

Examiners should take any special needs the candidate might have in to account and adopt a flexible approach to make reasonable adjustment to the way the test is conducted.

2.11: Combination side cars & motor-tricycles

These vehicles used by candidates with a physical disability are not required to carry out the manual handling exercises or avoidance exercise; they are required to carry out the first circuit bend and the controlled stop in addition to the emergency stop exercise. Additional time should be allowed for this test to be conducted.

The decision on whether to use a left or right circuit should be based on the characteristics of the machine, generally if a sidecar is positioned on the left of the machine a right handed circuit should be used and vice versa.

The examiner should remove cones number two and four from the slalom exercise to account for the increased turning circle of combination units, there should normally be no need to alter the two cones used for the figure of eight exercise. The width between the cones associated with the speed measuring device and the width of the controlled stopping box should be increased to 1 ½ times the width of the outfit.

The U turn may be carried out from either left to right or right to left side of the area, depending on the configuration of the combination unit some cones may need to be repositioned to take into account the increased turning circle of combination units only. EU Codes: 45 motorcycle only with sidecar. 125 motor-tricycle.

2.12: Mopeds

The left / right bend (circuit ride), emergency stop exercise and the avoidance exercise should be carried out at a minimum speed of 30kph (18.75mph).

The first blue cone (adjacent to the red cone) that candidates are required to steer around during the avoidance exercise should be stepped in one metre. This narrows the space between the blue marker cones which represent the avoidance channel.

All other aspects of the test remain the same as for Category A tests.

2.13: Module One Pass Certificate - DVSA 12

Pass certificates are numbered a different number format is used to differentiate them from Module Two certificates. As with all pass certificates they must be completed in black ink in block capitals. The following points should assist in completing the pass certificate:

Candidates name - entered normally.

Candidates driver number - enter from licence.

Theory test pass certificate number - enter from candidates theory test certificate.

Date of theory test pass - enter from candidates theory test certificate.

Exempt - Yes / No; ‘Yes’ if candidate is exempt from theory test as a result of holding a full licence in category A or P. ‘No’ if candidate requires valid theory test. Strike out as appropriate.

Category: Enter category - aligned to the right.

Automatic: ‘Yes’ / ‘No’ - strike out as appropriate.

Extended: ‘Yes’ / ‘No’ - strike out as appropriate.

Restriction Code: Enter appropriate code if required.

Date: Enter in DD/MM/YY format.

At: Enter test centre location in text.

Examiners signature, Examiners name: Enter as normal.

Candidates signature: Candidate is required to sign Module One pass certificate.

2.14: Module 2 Preliminaries

Module Two begins with the normal identity and entitlement checks. The candidate must produce the following valid documents:

  • a photo card driving licence or a paper licence and current passport.
  • DL196 CBT certificate (if applicable)
  • Module One pass certificate
  • photocopies of documents are not acceptable

Note: A Module One pass certificate issued in Northern Ireland is acceptable, but the candidate must have their theory test pass certificate to show to the examiner. This is because the date of the theory test pass is not recorded on module 1 pass certificates issued in Northern Ireland.

Examiners must check:

(a) The date of theory test passed (either from the module one pass certificate or the theory test pass certificate. This must be dated on or before the date of passing module one.

(b) The sub-category of machine used for module One and ensure it matches the machine presented for Module Two.

The candidate is required to sign the insurance and residency declarations.

The candidate should be fitted with a radio at this point.

The following numbers relate to the DL25MC:

  • 1a The eyesight test is carried out in Module Two in line with normal procedures.
  • 1b The safety and balance questions are part of Module Two. Two safety questions and one balance question from the approved list of questions should be asked.
  • 2 - 8 These boxes are only used to record faults committed on Module One. They should not be used for Module Two.
  • 9 These boxes are only used on Module One. They should not be used for Module Two.
  • 10 - 11 These boxes feature on both modules.
  • 12 - 32 These boxes should be used to record faults committed during Module Two.

Result of test: Mark appropriate box.

Total Faults: Record number of faults - Ten or less rider faults required to pass, more than ten rider faults or one or more serious or dangerous faults will result in failure.

Route number: Enter route number.

ETA boxes: Mark as normal.

Survey boxes: Survey box ‘E’ should be marked for bike to bike and ‘F’ for car to bike. Mark other boxes as normal.

Eco Safe Riding: Assess control and planning. As per DT1 Chapter 1, paragraph 1.41.

Debrief: If the Trainer/ Accompanying rider is present mark the debrief box.

Activity Code: Mark as normal.

Pass Certificate Number: Enter as normal.

Licence Rec’d box: Follow current ADLI guidelines.

Health declaration: Candidate to sign as normal.

The minimum on road riding time is 30 minutes for an ordinary test, examiners should aim to spend 33 - 35 minutes on road to ensure this requirement is met.

2.15: Module 2 Test Requirements

Module 2 is the on road test and consists of:

  • eyesight test
  • safety questions
  • balance question
  • a minimum of 30 minutes on road riding, which includes 10 minutes of independent riding (the target time for module 2 is 33 - 35 minutes)
  • 2 normal stops
  • angled start
  • hill start (if available)

To pass module 2, candidates must commit no more than 10 rider faults with no serious or dangerous faults.

2.16: Motorcycle Safety and Balance Questions

The candidate should be asked 2 machine safety check questions and one balance question relating to the carrying of a pillion passenger.

To ensure uniformity the safety questions must be selected from the bank of questions listed at Annex two.

The balance question should be straightforward and not complex. A sample of questions is given below: “What problems could arise from carrying a pillion passenger?” “How should a passenger be carried on the pillion seat?” “How would the balance of the machine be affected if you carried a pillion passenger?”

As a general rule the safety questions should be used in rotation. However, examiners will need to exercise common sense and discretion at times, for example if a particular machine does not lend itself to a question.

The questions used (and the answers given) should be recorded on the back of the DL25 MC if they affect the outcome of the test.

Although some checks may involve the candidate in identifying how fluid levels would be checked, pupils must not be asked to touch a hot engine or physically check the fluid levels.

Assessment

One or more questions answered incorrectly will result in one riding fault being recorded. However, examiners should not pursue questions unduly in an attempt to elicit the precise responses listed; they should bear in mind that these are basic safety checks, and that in-depth knowledge is not required for the answers to be acceptable.

If an Examiner has to take action to avoid danger to the candidate or another road user, an ETA will be recorded and a serious/dangerous fault recorded under the appropriate heading on the DL25MC.

2.17: Indicators

Motor cycles are not required by law to be fitted with direction indicators, but if they are fitted the law requires them to be in good and efficient working order at all times when the machine is in use on the road. Indicators on some small capacity machines tend to dim when the machine is travelling slowly or is stationary. This is due to machine design and tests should not be terminated on this account.

2.18: Radio Equipment

After the usual pre-test preliminaries e.g. licence and identification check the examiner should help the candidate with the fitting of the radio and earpiece.

They should then accompany the candidate to the machine, explaining how the test will be conducted and how the radio equipment works.

The examiner should make note of any non-standard controls on the candidate’s machine, but the machine or its controls should not be handled.

After the eyesight test, a sound check should be made to ensure that the candidate can hear the examiner’s instructions clearly.

At the start of a motorcycle test examiners should explain to candidates that, should the radio fail during the test or they cannot hear the instructions for any other reason they should just pull up. They should not be instructed to ride along tapping the side of their helmet.

Examiners should also explain that before the start of the independent section of the ride they will pull the candidate up and explain what is required.

Maximum use should be made of all available test routes to minimise annoyance to local residents.

2.19: Road Riding

If the candidate is a very slow rider, to the extent that the test is likely to result in failure, the examiner should not persist on a route with dual carriageways and roads with fast moving traffic, as that could be hazardous for both riders. The route should be altered to cause the least danger.

All progress, or lack of it, must be commensurate with the size of machine and the road and traffic conditions. A rider should not necessarily be expected to ride at the speed limit, although riding well below it in good road and traffic situations would not be acceptable.

A candidate should not be encouraged to make better progress or to filter along a line of other vehicles. However, if a candidate chooses to filter and does so safely, it should not be regarded as a fault.

2.20: Positioning and rear observation

The candidate should take up the correct position on the road when riding straight ahead and when taking corners. Before changing direction, slowing or stopping they should take rear observation.

In difficult traffic situations where this might be hazardous, it is acceptable for them to use the mirror(s). The need to glance behind does not apply in the case of a candidate with a disability, which prevents them from taking direct rear observation; instead, observation should be made by use of suitably positioned mirrors.Rear observation is a combination of looking behind and mirror checks, which ensures the rider is always fully aware of what is happening behind. The candidate should use judgement in deciding when to look behind. Obviously when they are looking behind they are not looking ahead.

This could be hazardous if, for example, they are close to the vehicle in front or if they are overtaking at speed - it is often safer for them to keep their eyes on what is happening ahead. Equally there are situations when it is potentially dangerous not to look behind, such as turning right from a major road into a minor road.

In congested urban situations a candidate is expected to use the lifesaver as a last check into the blind spot before committing themselves to a manoeuvre.

2.20: Hill Start

If the route includes an uphill section, the candidate should be asked to pull up at a suitable place on the gradient, and then asked to move off and continue on the same route.

2.21: Radio and Examiner Bike Breakdown

If the radio equipment fails, every effort should be made to complete the test, and subsequent tests, by giving instructions on route as in the case of non-hearing candidates.

Exceptionally it may be necessary to cancel alternate tests because of the time element. If the DTC does not carry spare radios then examiners should contact their SM as soon as possible to arrange for spare radio equipment to be made available.

Note: Examiners are permitted to carry out a Direct Access test without being in radio contact with the candidate.

If the examiner’s motorcycle breaks down, the test, and subsequent tests, should be cancelled unless the fault can be rectified quickly, or an alternative properly insured vehicle is available for use.

2.22: Safety, Security, and Care of DVSA MC’s

Examiners must ride with dipped headlights and wear a fluorescent jacket or waistcoat during the test.

Motorcycle examiners responsible for an official motorcycle should ensure at all times that when the machine is left unattended, the steering is locked and the key kept in a safe place.

If the machine is left unattended for longer periods, then additionally the locking ‘U’ bolt must be used. Whenever possible, the machine should be kept undercover overnight.

Examiners with responsibility for cleaning an official motorcycle are allocated one period per month in which to do so. They should arrange with the Area Office to have this period made available at a convenient time.

2.23: Combined Braking Systems and ABS

It is important that examiners recognise a machine presented for test with the above system fitted, as this may influence the assessment in relation to front/ rear brake use in normal riding and particularly for the emergency stop exercise.

The candidate should not be asked whether their machine has a combined braking system. However, most machines with this system fitted advertise this by means of a sticker displayed on the machine, and with experience the examiner will know the machines concerned.

Background

Combined braking systems should not be confused with ‘split braking systems’. The latter is purely a fail-safe system that gives partial braking should there be a loss of brake fluid pressure in any part of the system.

Essentially, combined braking means that when one brake is used the other is applied too, but all work on the same principle using some sort of control mechanism to distribute braking pressure in a proportional manner.

Assessment

Examiners should accept for normal riding on machines with combined brakes fitted that the rear brake might be used more (or solely used) at slow speeds than with a conventional braking system. When assessing the emergency stop the examiner must keep in mind that the most effective way to stop the machine quickly is still to use the front brake in conjunction with rear. However late or no use of the rear brake could be assessed as a rider fault if the machine stops quickly and under control. Very late or ineffective use of the front brake is not acceptable.

ABS - Anti-lock braking system

Note: Anti-lock braking systems (ABS) are being fitted to an increasing number of motorcycles. Examiners should not enquire if a motorcycle presented for a test is fitted with ABS.

Some ABS systems require the clutch to be pulled in and the front/rear brake to be applied at the same time to brake in an emergency situation; therefore a fault should not be recorded purely for using this technique with a motorcycle fitted with ABS on the emergency stop exercise.

On the emergency stop exercise, under severe braking, tyre or other noise may be heard, this does not necessarily mean the wheels have locked and are skidding. Examiners should bear these points in mind when assessing the candidate’s control during this exercise.

Further advice regarding ABS is given in the DVSA publication ‘riding the essential skills’.

2.24: Interpreters

From 7th April 2014, candidates will no longer be able to use foreign language interpreters on their test.

A special needs interpreter may accompany deaf and/ or deaf without speech candidates for tests conducted in English or Welsh only. The interpreter must be at least 16 years of age. In such cases a car should be used for the module 2 test.

A English or Welsh only speaking special needs interpreter is allowed on to the motorcycle manoeuvring area, but must wear a reflective waistcoat. (Spare Hi viz waistcoats held at the test centre should be made available if required).

If a special needs interpreter turns up unannounced and a car is not available then the test should be postponed.

Examiners should ask the special needs interpreter for their name at the start of the test and enter it on the DL25MC with any other useful additional information.

2.25: Compulsory Basic Training (CBT) - Supervision and Monitoring

The following are the DVSA’s responsibilities towards visiting ATBs.

Firstly, to ensure that new riders are taken through the official syllabus element by element, until finally being issued with the certificate of completion (DL196), thus enabling them to ride unaccompanied on public roads for the first time. Also, to make sure that trainees are only allowed to progress from one element to the next after reaching the correct level of proficiency.

Another purpose is to check that ATBs are adhering to the conditions of appointment from an administration point of view. e.g. the keeping of proper instructor records, security of DL196 forms etc.

When examiners visit ATB sites for the purpose of supervising the training, it is important to remember that DVSA is constrained as to the extent of advice and guidance that can be given to instructors. To help keep within these limitations; the CBT25 form should be used as an “aide memoir”, as it is a copy of the CBT Syllabus.

The order of the Elements (A - E), must not be changed although instructors can, if they wish, change the order of headings within each element.

Each heading within an element must be covered by the instructor, but in their own way. DVSA cannot dictate how a particular item is covered or what instructional technique is used.

For example:

For simulated left and right turns, cones or lines on the ground may be used, advice should not be given as to measurement or spacing;

Practise of changing gear can involve the use of two or more gears, depending on the availability of space or length of area. Advice should not be given as to the number of gears to be used;

The road session must last a minimum of 2 hours and perhaps more, depending on the ability of the trainees. Advice should not be given as to a maximum length of time; Although at Cardington DVSA advocate that instructors ride at the rear of a group of riders, some ATBs vary the position of the instructor. DVSA can’t insist on our methods being used.

Guidance notes on CBT standards have been formulated and are circulated to ATB instructors. These help them in deciding when a trainee can progress from one element of the course to the next and eventually receive the certificate of completion, DL196. These notes are also available to examiners to help when assessing instructors during visits to CBT sites.

Examiners who supervise CBT training, should give whatever advice or guidance they feel necessary at the time, but remembering that if at all unsure of their facts, should report the matter to the local CBT Manager who will follow up as necessary. DVSA has a commitment to visit each instructor, at least once in their 4 year registration period. It is important that we meet that commitment.

2.26: Extended Test

Candidates who are required to take an extended test will have to pass an ordinary length Module One and an extended Module Two test. Both journals will show extended test, the ‘EXT’ box on both DL25MCs should be marked.

The on road riding time for an extended test must be at least 60 minutes, examiners should aim to spend at least 70 minutes on road to ensure this is met.