News article

Poppies planted to mark 100 years since World War 1

This world location news article was published under the 2010 to 2015 Conservative and Liberal Democrat coalition government

British and Korean school children gathered at the British Embassy this morning for an event to mark 100 years since World War 1.

British and Korean school children gathered at the British Embassy this morning for an event to mark 100 years since World War 1.

Eleven from local and international schools planted poppies in the garden of the British Ambassador’s Residence in Jung-gu, Seoul. It is hoped the flowers will bloom in advance of August 4, the day in 1914 when Britain joined the conflict.

During the four year war, poppies were prevalent in the battlefields of France and Belgium. They were adopted as a symbol of Remembrance in 1921. People in the UK and the Commonwealth wear replicas every year on and around Remembrance Day in November to commemorate all those killed in conflict.

World War 1 remains one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with more than 9 million combatants killed.

British Ambassador Scott Wightman said:

The horrors of the First World War and the sacrifices made by so many must never be forgotten. Every generation owes a debt of gratitude to those who have come before them to protect freedom and democracy. I am therefore delighted that these young students were able to join us today for this meaningful event and I look forward to seeing these symbols of remembrance in full bloom.