Research and analysis

Understanding the journeys from work to Employment and Support Allowance

This research helps us to understand how people move from work to claiming Employment and Support Allowance (ESA).

Documents

Understanding the journeys from work to Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)

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Summary: Understanding the journeys from work to Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)

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Details

This research improves the evidence we have about how people move from work to claiming Employment and Support Allowance (ESA).

It follows previous research about Routes onto ESA that helped inform Dame Carol Black’s 2008 review of sickness absence Working for a healthier tomorrow: work and health in Britain. In her review, Dame Carol recommended we investigate further :

  • why some people move straight from work to ESA with no sickness absence first
  • who is most likely to do this

We will use the findings from this latest research to:

  • inform measures to prevent people from falling out of work due to ill health
  • develop future ESA strategy
  • support the approach taken by Fit for Work, the new national independent health and work advice and referral service
  • support work with employers to:
    • foster a culture of health at work
    • facilitate discussions with employees about health conditions in relation to work, in particular mental health conditions
    • increase provision of adjustments and access to health and wellbeing policies at work

Authors: Lorna Adams, Katie Oldfield, Catherine Riley, Becky Duncan and Christabel Downing (IFF Research Ltd.)

Published 25 June 2015