Independent report

The report of the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities

The Commission's report into racial and ethnic disparities in the UK.

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Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities: report (large print version)

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Raw data for figures 1 to 21

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Details

There have been some amendments to the report since it was published. These amendments are shown only in the HTML sections and not the PDFs.

The Commission’s report sets out a new, positive agenda for change. It balances the needs of individuals, communities and society, maximising opportunities and ensuring fairness for all.

The Commission has considered detailed quantitative data and qualitative evidence to understand why disparities exist, what works and what does not. It has commissioned new research and invited submissions from across the UK.

Its work and recommendations will improve the quality of data and evidence about the types of barriers faced by people from different backgrounds. This will help to inform actions and drive effective and lasting change.

Published 31 March 2021
Last updated 28 April 2021 + show all updates
  1. 4 sections have been amended in the HTML version, as follows: (1) ‘Foreword from the Chair’, in the section ‘Foreword, introduction, and full recommendations’ – added a footnote to the line ‘There is a new story about the Caribbean experience which speaks to the slave period not only being about profit and suffering but how culturally African people transformed themselves into a re-modelled African/Britain.’ The footnote reads: ‘To clarify, this is to say that in the face of the inhumanity of slavery, African people preserved their humanity and culture. This includes the story of slave resistance. One such example is documented in: Buckridge, S. O., (2004), ‘The Language of Dress: Resistance and Accommodation in Jamaica, 1750-1890’, University of West Indies Press.’ (2) ‘Making of modern Britain: teaching an inclusive curriculum’, in the section ‘Education and training’ – changed the line ‘The language of writers in the Commonwealth, such as Derek Walcott, Seamus Heaney, and Andrea Levy is steeped in British cultural traditions, but these writers have also shaped contemporary thinking and attitudes’ to ‘Commonwealth writers such as Derek Walcott, Wilson Harris and Andrea Levy have been influenced by British cultural traditions but have created their own style becoming great writers in their own right.’ (3) Appendix C: Commissioned research – amended the introduction, and removed the name of 2 people (Professor Martin White and Dr Jean Adams). (4) Appendix D: Stakeholders – amended the introduction, removed the names of 3 people (S.I Martin, Gerry Wareham, Stephen Bourne) and two organisations (Race Council Cymru, National BAME Youth Forum Wales), and added one organisation (Reach Society).

  2. First published.