Research and analysis

The drivers of perceptions of anti-social behaviour

Home Office Research Report 34 proposes that perceptions of antisocial behaviour are a matter of interpretation.

Documents

The drivers of perceptions of anti-social behaviour key implications

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The drivers of perceptions of anti-social behaviour summary

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The drivers of perceptions of anti-social behaviour report

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Detail

Home Office Research Report 34 proposes that perceptions of antisocial behaviour (‘PASB’), in the technical British Crime Survey definition, are a matter of interpretation.

There is frequently a mismatch between an objective measure of ASB, and perceptions.

Based on a review of available research studies, the authors model two processes of interpretation that seem to be fundamental in driving this, and suggest that the reason why people make different interpretations of behaviour rests in social connectedness.