Research and analysis

Social benefits of buses: valuing the social impacts

Research looking into ways of valuing the social benefits of buses.

Documents

Valuing the social impacts of public transport: final report

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Monetising the social impact of bus travel

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Social benefit of buses: an estimation with discrete choice models

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Details

This research provides a methodology and set of values to estimate the social impacts of local public transport access. It offers new information to help the department and local councils better reflect social impacts when considering investment in public transport.

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport commented:

I am pleased to be publishing research that will allow us to put hard numbers on the social benefits of local bus services.

There is a large body of evidence on the types of social benefits that public transport generates, but up to now very little evidence which quantifies and monetises these impacts. We know that the existence of a bus service makes it easier for people without cars to access social services and job opportunities, but up until now, very little was known about the value of such access. To address this gap in our knowledge, in January 2012, the department commissioned Mott MacDonald, supported by the Institute for Transport Studies at the University of Leeds, and Accent Marketing and Research, to carry out research into valuing the social impacts of public transport.

This research provides new and valuable information to help the department and local authorities better reflect social impacts when they are considering investment in public transport and will be particularly relevant where the objectives of a policy relate to improving accessibility and reducing social exclusion. It therefore provides more information for the decision making process.

Published 12 August 2013