Research and analysis

School business management: a quiet revolution

An overview of evidence showing the development and future of the role of school business managers and the impact they have on schools.

Documents

School business management: a quiet revolution, part 1

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School business management: a quiet revolution, part 2

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Details

The introduction of training for bursars started a trend that has grown and developed. It launched a movement across the school system which continues today and is set to go further in the future.

Part 1

This first of the 2 studies into the benefits of school business managers (SBMs) shows where the move to SBMs started and what happened in the early years of training them. It considers the current state of play and looks at what is needed next and in the future. It also provides a number of case studies used to help inform us about business management practices.

The evidence demonstrates that SBMs make a difference and bring far more benefits than costs to schools. They ensure schools provide value for money and find ways through difficult financial times. The evidence shows that SBMs also save their senior leaders time, in the case of headteachers, significant amounts of time.

Part 2

The second of 2 studies looks at more detail the 4 major studies that were cited in part 1 and that underpin the evidence showing the impact that SBMs have on schools. The 4 studies are:

  1. PricewaterhouseCoopers, 2010a, Strategic Study of School Business Managers and School Business Directors, Nottingham, National College for Leadership of Schools and Children’s Services
  2. PricewaterhouseCoopers, 2010b, Cost Benefit Analysis of the School Business Management Programme, Nottingham, National College for Leadership of Schools and Children’s Services
  3. Oakleigh Consulting, 2010, Financial Impact Assessment of the National College of School Business Manager Demonstration Projects, Nottingham, National College for Leadership of Schools and Children’s Services
  4. University of Manchester, 2010, School Business Management Demonstration Project Evaluation Study, (Woods et al, 2010)