Research and analysis

Perceptions of the social harms associated with khat use

Home Office Research Report 44 explored the perceived social harms associated with the use of khat.

Documents

Perceptions of the social harms associated with khat use key implications

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Perceptions of the social harms associated with khat use summary

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Perceptions of the social harms associated with khat use report

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Detail

Home Office Research Report 44 explored the perceived social harms associated with the use of khat, which is a vegetable stimulant grown and used in the countries of East Africa and the Middle East and available in the UK. A qualitative approach was taken to gather information from: members of the UK Somali, Yemeni and Ethiopian communities; members of the wider community; and practitioners.

The research found that Khat use was widely socially acceptable though heavy use less so, widespread support for some level of government intervention and also for better quality information and data on khat. The study also included a short survey of Drug Action Teams (DATS) which found few dedicated treatment or support services available for khat users.