Ant Broads and Marshes

The Ant Broads and Marshes NNR is part of the Ant Broads and Marshes Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). Barton Broad is a medieval peat digging that drains into the River Ant. The surrounding fen was exploited for peat in the mid-19th century and was more recently managed for commercial sedge and reed.

Main habitats: peatland

Area: 178 hectares

Management: Norfolk Wildlife Trust (Catfield Fen Reserve is owned and managed by Butterfly Conservation)

Features of interest

The broad is ringed by areas of reedswamp that provide a nesting habitat for wildfowl such as gadwall, pochard, teal, shoveler and tufted duck. There is a large population of swallowtail butterflies, and a significant number of rare and uncommon dragonflies, moths, beetles and flies.

The fens are home to the nationally rare crested buckler fern. Nationally important areas of carr woodland (fen woodlands dominated by alder) are also present.

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and special features is on the Barton Broad page of the Norfolk Wildlife Trust website, and on the Butterfly Trust page on Catfield Fen.

Directions

The broad is accessed via the A1151. The villages of Irstead, Barton Turf and Neatishead are close to the broad and all have parking areas.

The nearest train station is Hoveton & Wroxham, 8 kilometres to the south west.

Local bus services are provided by First Group.

There is a circular boardwalk on the broad near Irstead but elsewhere access is limited due to the marshy ground. You can take boat trips from the moorings near Neatishead.

Catfield Fen is on the eastern side of the broad, 1.5 kilometres west of Catfield village. Catsfield is near the A149 and parking is available in the village.

Due to the marshy ground the fen is only accessible on open days, although you can view the area from the boundary. Contact Butterfly Conservation for details of open days.

Blakeney

Situated on the north Norfolk coast, the reserve is part of the Wash and North Norfolk Coast possible Special Area of Conservation (pSAC) for its many features of interest, including subtidal sandbanks, saltmarsh, intertidal mudflats and sandbanks, shallow inlets and bays and seal colonies.

Main habitats: coastal

Area: 1097 hectares

Management: National Trust.

Features of interest

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit is on the Blakeney page on the National Trust website).

Contact

Email: blakeneypoint@nationaltrust.org.uk Telephone: 01263 740241

Morston Quay
Quay Road
Morston
NR25 7BH

Brettenham Heath

Scrub, trees and bracken covered most of the site before it became a National Nature Reserve but most has been cleared since 1982 to restore the plant communities and patterned ground. Bracken and, to a lesser extent, scrub still covers several hectares of the NNR. Woodland of silver birch, oak and Scot’s pine is within the NNR and around part of the boundary.

During the bird breeding season (March to October), much of Brettenham Heath is closed to the public.

Main habitats: lowland heath

Area: 233 hectares

Features of interest

Acid grassland covers more than half of Brettenham Heath, with chalk grassland and heather heathland occupying smaller areas.

Underlying Brettenham Heath is the chalk bedrock which was laid down in shallow seas during the Cretaceous period. This rock is many tens of metres thick, and close to the soil surface in places. The soils are predominantly sands overlying the chalk. The depth of soil above the chalk is variable, ranging from a few centimetres in the east/south to several metres deep in the west/north. Where the soil is shallow it is chalky, but where the soil is deep it is mildly acidic.

For more information about the geology, history and notable species, see Natural England’s pages on Brettehnam Heath in the National Archive.

Directions

Brettenham Heath is 4 miles north-east of Thetford, Norfolk, on the south side of the A11 dual carriageway.

There is a car park adjacent to Brettenham Heath on High Bridgham Road. From the A11, take the turning signed ‘The Heath’ and the car park is on the left after about 800 metres.

The nearest railway station is at Thetford. For details of railway times and bus times, go to the traveline website.The nearest village where buses stop is Bridgham, which is 2.5 kilometres to the east.

Bure Marshes

Lying at the heart of the Norfolk Broads, Bure Marshes NNR is part of Britain’s biggest and best wetland, a mosaic of rivers, broads, ditches, wet woodland and open fens.

Main habitats: wetland: open water (broads, dykes, turf ponds) tall-herb fen, reed and sedge beds, fen meadow, wet scrub and woodland.

Area: 451.5 hectares

Management: Hoveton Great Broad and Woodbastwick Marshes are managed by Natural England, while Norfolk Wildlife Trust manages Ranworth Broad and Ebb and Flow Marshes

Features of interest

A fine example of typical broads undrained wetland, with a wide range of habitats and plant and animal communities in the succession from open water to carr woodland (wet woods dominated by alder and sallow). Breeding and wintering bird species including bittern, marsh harrier, reed, sedge and grasshopper warblers, bearded tit, and many wildfowl.

The fens and waterways support many rare and notable insect species, swallowtail butterflies and Norfolk hawker dragonflies. Around and in the dykes and Broads you may also see some of the other 18 species of dragonflies and damsel flies, otters, water voles and grass snakes found throughout the reserve.

For more details on visiting the reserve go to the Norfolk Wildlife Trust page on Ranworth Broad.

For more information about seasonal highlights, managing the reserve and the reserve’s history, see Natural England’s pages on Bure Marshes in the National Archive.

Directions

By train

The nearest train station is Salhouse (4 kilometres) then public footpaths and quiet country roads link to Salhouse village. Woodbastwick is the next village, 6.5 kilometres from the station

By bus

There are frequent bus services 7 days a week to Salhouse village or Monday to Saturday to South Walsham, which is near the eastern end of the NNR.

By car

The NNR lies between the towns of Wroxham and Acle, 10.5 kilometres north east of Norwich, off the A1151 (Norwich to Stalham) or A47 (Norwich to Great Yarmouth).

By boat

Wroxham is the nearest main centre for boat hire.

Main access points:

  • Salhouse Broad car park, Salhouse village, for the ferry service to Hoveton Great Broad Nature Trail, open April to mid-September and staffed by a Natural England reserve warden - TG 319150

  • Hoveton great Broad Nature Trail moorings 3 miles downstream from Wroxham, north bank of the River Bure, opposite Salhouse Broad - TG 318159

  • Ferry Road car park and moorings, Woodbastwick, for Cockshoot Boardwalk, open all year and is wheelchair accessible with disabled parking facilities nearby - TG 333165

School and community groups

There are opportunities for higher education and community groups interested in wetland ecology and management to visit Woodbastwick Marshes. Contact the Senior Reserves Manager.

Volunteers

There are some opportunities for volunteers to join a small team carrying out practical management works and species survey. Contact john.white@naturalengland.org.uk or telephone 07899 901 566.

Contact

For more information contact the Senior Reserves Manager:

Email rick.southwood@naturalengland.org.uk Telephone; 01603 720788

For information about Ranworth Broad contact Norfolk wildlife Trust.

Calthorpe Broad

Main habitats: peatland

Area: 44 hectares

This National Nature Reserve is currently closed to the public. This will be because:

  • the site is unsafe

  • our tenure of the land does not allow public access

  • the site is so fragile that any form of access would damage the wildlife interest

Contact

Email: enquiries@naturalengland.org.uk
Telephone: 0300 060 3900

Dersingham Bog

Dersingham Bog NNR is part of the Sandringham Royal Estate and includes the largest, most intact example of an acid valley mire in East Anglia. It is also one of the last remaining fragments of lowland heathland in south east England.

To prevent disturbance to rare ground nesting birds and the grazing herd of Black Galloway cattle, dogs must be kept on a short lead (not more than 2 metres in length) at all times.

Main habitats: mire, heath and woodland

Area: 165 hectares

Management: Natural England

Since the 1990s, Natural England has been working towards restoring the habitats on the reserve, so that important species that depend on the site can once again flourish.

Features of interest

The low-lying mire is dominated by bog mosses Sphagnum spp. Several uncommon plants are present including round-leaved sundew, oblong-leaved sundew, cranberry, bog asphodel and white beak-sedge.

Dersingham Bog NNR supports nationally important numbers of breeding Nightjar. In 2004, 28 churring males was recorded, the highest number ever recorded on the site. More recently, the population appears to have stabilised at 18 to 22 pairs. Other notable breeding populations/species include woodlark 6 territories, grasshopper warbler 4 territories, tree pipit 14 territories, stonechat 2 pairs.

The Greensand escarpment acts as an important landline for migrating birds and during the autumn and, to a lesser extent spring.

For details about seasonal highlights and the history of the site, see Natural England’s pages on Dersingham Bog in the National Archive.

Directions

By cycle

Sandringham is on Sustrans National Cycle Route 1 There is no cycle access on the reserve, but a cycle rack is at the Wolferton car park.

By rail

The nearest train station is King’s Lynn, 10 kilometres south west of the reserve.

By bus

For details on bus services to Wolferton village and Sandringham, visit the Norfolk Green website.

By car

Two unsurfaced car parks are situated along the minor road to Wolferton village to the west of the A149. The ‘cliff top’ car park is located at TF6626 2840, whilst the ‘Scissors cross’ car park is located at TF6682 2804.

School and community groups

For any visits to Dersingham NNR, contact the Enquiry Centre on 0300 060 3900.

Volunteers

Volunteers play an important role in the management of Dersingham Bog NNR, helping with a wide variety of tasks. To find out more contact Thomas.Bolderstone@naturalengland.org.uk.

Contact

To find out more about the reserve contact the Enquiry Centre on 0300 060 3900.

To find out about volunteering opportunities please contact Tom Bolderstone at Thomas.Bolderstone@naturalengland.org.uk.

Foxley Wood

Foxley Wood NNR is the Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s premier woodland reserve and the largest remaining ancient woodland in the county. The site is a good example of how an ancient woodland can be restored following coniferisation.

Main habitats: woodland, wood pasture

Area: 125 hectares

Management: Norfolk Wildlife Trust.

Features of interest

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit is on the Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s page on Foxley Wood.

Contact

Email: info@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk Telephone: 01603 625540

Hickling Broad

Hickling Broad is located 23 kilometres north east of Norwich. It is part of the Upper Thurne Broads and Marshes Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), which includes Horsey Mere and Martham Broad. The international importance of this area has been recognised in its designation as a Broads Ramsar site.

Main habitats: broads with associated habitats

Management: Norfolk Wildlife Trust; part of the reserve is being leased from a local landowner

Features of interest

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit is on the Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s page on Hickling Broad.

Contact

Telephone: Tel: 01603 625540

NWT Head of Nature Reserves
Norfolk Wildlife Trust
Bewick House
22 Thorpe Road
Norwich
NR1 1RY

Holkham

Holkham National Nature Reserve is a spectacular 11-mile stretch of fragile windswept coastline, including a maze of creeks and marshes, unspoilt sand dunes and tranquil pine forests.

Main habitat: coastal

Management: partnership between the Holkham Estate and Natural England (Holkham Estate are responsible for the management of all the land they own within the NNR, essentially all the terrestrial habitats, part of which is managed under the Higher Level Stewardship scheme, while Natural England manage the foreshore, below the mean high water mark, under lease from the Crown Estate.)

The boundaries are shown on the Holkham boundaries map

Features of interest

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit is on the Holkham Estate website.

Contact

Telephone: 01328 800730

Sarah Henderson
Conservation Manager
Hill Farm Office
Main Road
Holkham
Wells-next-the-sea
Norfolk
NR23 1AD

Holme Dunes

Holme Dunes is made up of a range of coastal habitats: intertidal sands and mud, sand and shingle bars, saltmarsh, sand dune, freshwater and salty pools and grazing marshes.

Main habitat: coastal

Management: Norfolk Wildlife Trust.

Features of interest

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit is on the Holme Dunes website.

Contact

Email: info@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk
Telephone: 01485 525240

How Hill

How Hill National Nature Reserve forms a large area of established wetland within the River Ant Valley and is of national and international importance for nature conservation. The reserve hosts an array of important habitats including fen, reedbed, wet woodland and shallow lakes.

Main habitats: wetland

Management: Broads Authority with fen and reedbed habitats managed for conservation under the Higher Level Stewardship scheme

Reed and sedge beds suitable for traditional thatching products are still commercially harvested by local reed cutters.

Features of interest

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit is on the Enjoy the Broads website.

Contact

Email: dan.hoare@broads-authority.gov.uk Telephone: 01603 610734

Dan Hoare (Environment and Design Supervisor)
Broads Authority
Yare House
62-64 Thorpe Road
Norwich
NR1 1RY

Ludham and Potter Heigham Marshes

A traditionally-managed grazing marsh in the Norfolk Broads which supports a diverse range of wetland plant, insect and bird species.

Due to presence of grazing animals and sensitive bird species, you should keep to the public footpaths.

Main habitats: lowland wet grassland, fen meadow, open water in dyke system

Area: 86 hectares

Features of interest

The dyke system, its edges trampled by cattle, supports over 100 species of aquatic and emergent plants, along with a rich community of invertebrates. In summer, damsel flies and dragonflies, including the rare Norfolk hawker, abound. Water voles live in and around the dykes, while many birds use the grass marshes for feeding and wintering.

Grazing cattle keep the grass sward short. Trampling of the dyke edges creates a tussocky ‘berm’ colonised by emergent and fen plants. Dykes which become overgrown or are in danger of filling in due to cattle trampling are cleaned out by mechanical digger. Water levels are controlled by sluices, excess water from nearby uplands being pumped out to the adjacent River Thurne.

Directions

By rail

Wroxham station is the closest, approximately 10 kilometres away.

By bus

There are regular buses from Wroxham 6 days a week.

By car

Ludham village is 1 kilometre from the NNR, off the A1062 Wroxham to Potter Heigham road. Parking near the NNR is extremely limited.

By boat

There is a small Broads Authority mooring at Womack Water (River Thurne) which overlooks the NNR.

Visits can be arranged in advance for specialists and small groups by contacting the Senior Reserves Manager.

Volunteers

There are sometimes opportunities for volunteers who are interested in species surveys. Contact john.white@naturalengland.org.uk or 07899 901 566

Contact

Email: rick.southwood@naturalengland.org.uk
Telephone: 01603 720788

Martham Broad

Martham Broad is located in north-east Norfolk and supports a range of wetland communities including open water with rich aquatic flora such as holly leaved naiad and a rich assemblage of stoneworts.

Main habitats: broads with tall herb fen, reedbed and reedswamp

Management: Norfolk Wildlife Trust under the Higher Level Stewardship scheme

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit is on the Martham Broad pages of the Norfolk Wildlife Trust website.

Contact

Telephone: 01603 625540

NWT Head of Nature Reserves
Norfolk Wildlife Trust
Bewick House
22 Thorpe Road
Norwich
NR1 1RY
EA

Mid-Yare

Mid Yare National Nature Reserve is a prime example of a Broadland floodplain wetland with a patchwork of wet woodlands, shallow lakes, reedfen, meadows and wet grassland along 5 miles of the Yare Valley. It is a great place to see many iconic Broadland species.

Main habitats: peatland

Area: 779 hectares

Management: Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) supported by Natural England under the Higher Level Stewardship scheme

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit is on the Strumpshaw Fen pages of the RSPB website.

Contact

Telephone: 01603 715191

Tim Strudwick
Site Manager
RSPB Mid Yare Reserve
Staithe Cottage
Low Road
Strumpshaw
Norwich
NR13 4HS

Paston Great Barn

Paston Great Barn is one of the best preserved, and few remaining, thatched great barns left in England. It also supports the only known breeding colony of Barbastelle bats to be found in a building.

The barn itself is closed to the public to minimise disturbance to the bats, but other access is provided.

Main habitats: medieval thatched barn with bat roost

Area: 0.9 hectares

Management: Natural England manages Paston Barn under a lease from the North Norfolk Historic Buildings Trust.

Since taking on the lease of the site, Natural England has worked in close liaison with Paston Heritage Society to draw together information on the biological, historical and architectural history of the site.

Features of interest

The Great Barn itself is a designated Scheduled Ancient Monument. The complex of buildings attached to the Great Barn are Grade II* buildings. This does not include the south boundary barn or the southern boundary wall, as they are not attached to the Great Barn or other buildings.

Paston Great Barn supports an exceptional assemblage of bat species and represents one of the few known maternity roosts of barbastelle bat Barbastella barbastellus in the UK (as well as the only confirmed barbastelle maternity roost in a building in the UK). In total, 5 species are known to have used the buildings: barbastelle, brown long-eared, common pipistrelle, soprano pipistrelle, Nathusius’ pipistrelle and natterer’s. In addition, a further two species have been recorded from around the buildings: noctule and Daubenton’s Bat.

Though general access into the barn is not allowed, it is possible to see bats flying around the grounds of the reserve from March to September, just after sunset.

For more information about seasonal highlights and the reserve’s history, see Natural England’s pages on Paston Great Barn in the National Archive.

Directions

Paston Barn is located 1 mile west of Bacton gas terminal on the A149, south east of Paston village.

By bus

A local coach service number 34 stops at Paston bus shelter in Paston village.

By train

The nearest train station is North Walsham.

School and community groups

For any visits to Paston Barn NNR, contact the Natural England Enquiry Service on 0300 060 3900.

Volunteers

For volunteering enquires contact Tom Bolderstone at Thomas.Bolderstone@naturalengland.org.uk.

Other volunteering opportunities are available with the Norfolk Barbastelle Study Group.

Contact

To find out more about the reserve please contact the Natural England Enquiry Service on 0845 600 3078.

Redgrave and Lopham Fen

Redgrave and Lopham Fen National Nature Reserve is an extensive area of spring-fed valley fen in the headwaters of the River Waveney on the Suffolk/Norfolk border. It is the largest fen in lowland England. The reserve has a range of distinct habitats including the internationally important saw sedge beds and purple-moor grasslands. It is also home to 1 of only 2 British populations of the fen raft spider

Main habitat: peatland

Management: Suffolk Wildlife Trust

Features of interest

For full information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit, see the Lopham Fen page on the Suffolk Wildlife Trust website.

Contact

Email: richard.young@suffolkwildlifetrust.org
Telephone: 01379 687618

Roydon Common

Roydon Common NNR is the largest remaining area of heathland and valley mire in the county and is made up of a mixture of dry and wet heath, valley mire, rough pasture and woodland habitats.

Main habitat: lowland heath

Management: Norfolk Wildlife Trust

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit is on the Roydon Common website.

Contact

Email: info@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk
Telephone: 01603 625540

Scolt Head Island

Scolt Head Island National Nature Reserve is the prime example of an offshore barrier island in the UK. It is situated on a dynamic coastline and is steadily growing westward.

Main habitats: coastal

Area: 727 hectares

Management: owned by National Trust and Norfolk Wildlife Trust and managed under lease by Natural England

Features of interest

The saltmarshes are considered to be among the finest in the UK and are the best documented and researched in the world. The island supports nationally and internationally important numbers of breeding terns (sandwich, common, arctic and little) and wintering wildfowl, and waders such as brent geese, shelduck, wigeon, teal and curlew.

The plant communities of the dunes and saltmarshes are classic examples of their type. Vegetated shingle ‘lows’ contain plant species of national importance such as matted sea lavender and sea heath.

Directions

The island is on the North Norfolk coast, 10 kilometres west of Wells-Next-The-Sea.

By ferry

The site is reached by a ferry from the village of Burnham Overy Staithe on the A149. The ferries are seasonal, operating from April to September. Further information on these is available from the Deepdale Visitor Information Centre.

If you wish to reach the island in your own vessel you should refer to the Brancaster Harbour conditions of Launch and General Directions document.

For launches from Burnham Overy Staithe see the information board at the harbour.

By foot/cycle

Burnham Overy Staithe is on the route of a major trail, the Peddars Way and Norfolk Coast Path, and is near National Cycle Route 1.

By train

The nearest train stations are in Sheringham and King’s Lynn.

By bus

Bus services from the above stations to local villages are provided by Norfolk Green

Contact

Michael Rooney,
Senior Reserve Manager
Natural England
Harbour Way
Brancaster
Staithe
PE31 8BW

Telephone: 01485 211171

Swanton Novers

Main habitats: woodland

Area: 84 ha

This National Nature Reserve is currently closed to the public. This will be because:

  • the site is unsafe

  • our tenure of the land does not allow public access

  • the site is so fragile that any form of access would damage the wildlife interest

Contact

Email: enquiries@naturalengland.org.uk
Telephone: 0300 060 3900

The Wash

The reserve is a mix of open deep water, permanent shallow water, mudflats and saltmarsh, representing one of Britain’s most important winter feeding areas for waders and wildfowl.

Main habitat: saltmarsh and mudflats

Area: 8,880 hectares

Features of interest

The Wash is a place where you can experience one of the last truly wild areas in Britain It is also an established area for scientific research and monitoring.

The saltmarshes provide an abundance of food for various birds, like Brent geese, wigeon and twite. During high tide, look out for birds like curlew, oystercatcher, knot and dunlin roosting on the saltmarsh, while overhead, aerial hunters like the marsh harrier can be seen hunting.

Walking along the sea wall (part of the Sir Peter Scott Walk) may provide you with the sight of a barn owl or short eared owl, and the chance to hear the skylark and the redshank haunting call.

During the winter, the Wash is an important feeding ground for up to 400,000 visiting birds.

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and special features is in the Natural England leaflet about The Wash.

Directions

The Wash National Nature Reserve is in Lincolnshire and Norfolk.

The reserve spreads across the southern reaches of the Wash and is accessed along minor roads from the A17, between King’s Lynn and Sutton Bridge.

By cycle

There is good cycle access, with cycle stands at both Kirton Marsh and Point Green. King’s Lynn is on the junction of National Cycle Route 1 and National Route 11.

By train

The nearest station is Kings Lynn.

By bus

Bus services along the A17 between King’s Lynn and Sutton Bridge are provided by Norfolk Green and Cavalier Travel. However, the stops are on the A17, 4 miles from the reserve.

On foot

A number of footpaths and trails cross the reserve, providing access to the NNR from local towns and villages.

For more information on walks see Natural England’s page ‘The Wash: how to get there’ in the National Archive.

Volunteers

Volunteer reserve warden opportunities are available. Interested volunteers will be the ‘ears and eyes’ and provide important information about activities occurring on the Wash NNR, including helping with bird surveys, litter picking and path maintenance.

Contact

For any visits to the Wash NNR, contact the Enquiry Centre on 0300 060 3900.

Weeting Heath

A wonderful piece of Breck heath, famous for its rare Breckland flora and population of rare breeding stone curlews.

Main habitats: lowland heath

Management: Norfolk Wildlife Trust.

Further information about the NNR, its wildlife and how to visit are on the Weeting Heath page on the Norfolk Wildlife Trust website.

Contact

Email: info@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk
Telephone: 01842 827615

Winterton Dunes

These spectacular acidic dunes and heaths are internationally important for the rare groups of plants and animals which they support, in a habitat more common in northern Europe than England.

Adders can be a hazard, especially to children and dogs, often on cool days when they may be slow to get out of the way. Avoid walking though rough vegetation by keeping to paths, and keep dogs on leads. If bitten, try to keep still and calm and seek medical attention.

Main habitats: coastal sand dunes, dune heath and slacks, freshwater pools

Area: 109 hectares

Features of interest

The NNR shows good coastal habitat succession from the open sand and shingle beach, through embryo and fixed dunes to acid heathland and low-lying wet dune slacks, with areas of scattered scrub. In spring, migrant birds such as wheatear and ring ouzel pass through, often with rarities mixed in. Little terns arrive in May, settling on the beach to breed, while natterjack toads can be heard calling from considerable distances. Many plant flower now, before the sandy soils dry out in summer.

The range of habitats here provide suitable homes for many rare insects such as sand wasps, many dragonflies and damselflies and a variety of butterflies including grayling and dark green fritillary.

Little terns and ringed plover nest in shallow scrapes on the sandy beach, nocturnal nightjars which use the heath to feed and breed can be heard ‘churring’ on warm summer evenings, and skylarks and stonechats are often seen or heard.

The temporary pools in the dune slacks provide breeding sites for nationally important colonies of natterjack toads. Grey and harbour seals may be seen along the coast and beach throughout the year.

Directions

Most of the reserve is a coastal strip north of, and almost immediately adjacent to, the town of Winterton-on-Sea. To the north it extends as far as a local coastal landmark known as Bramble Hill, two kilometres to the east of the village of Horsey.

On foot

A public footpath runs along the coast from Hemsby, near Great Yarmouth to Horsey, and passes through the reserve, linking in with the extensive local footpath network.

By cycle

Winterton-on-Sea is also on Regional Route 30 of the Sustrans National Cycle Network.

By train

The nearest train station is in Great Yarmouth.

By bus

Bus services from Great Yarmouth to Winterton-on-Sea are provided by First Group.

By car

From the A149 Great Yarmouth – Stalham road follow the B1159 to Winterton-on-Sea. Parking is available at the end of Beach Road, Winterton. The reserve begins a short distance to the north.

School and community groups

Many school and further education groups use the site for practical visits, often to demonstrate dune succession. Input from NNR staff, from brief introductions to guided walks, is available on request

Volunteers

There are opportunities for volunteers to assist with breeding little tern and grey seal visitor management, and species survey. Contact john.white@naturalengland.org.uk or telephone 07899 901 566

Contact

For more information contact the Senior Reserves Manager on rick.southwood@naturalengland.org.uk or telephone 01603 720788.