Research and analysis

Information sharing aimed at reducing violent crime: A survey of Community Safety Partnerships

Home Office Research Report 45 describes findings from a survey of Community Safety Partnerships (CSPs) across England and Wales.

Documents

Information sharing aimed at reducing violent crime: A survey of Community Safety Partnerships summary

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request an accessible format.

If you use assistive technology (eg a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email alternativeformats@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Information sharing aimed at reducing violent crime: A survey of Community Safety Partnerships report

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request an accessible format.

If you use assistive technology (eg a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email alternativeformats@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Detail

Home Office Research Report 45 describes findings from a survey of Community Safety Partnerships (CSPs) across England and Wales on the extent and nature of information sharing arrangements that were introduced to prevent and reduce violence and other crime types. The questionnaire investigated the types of information sharing arrangements in place, CSP’s understanding of and adherence to the legislative framework surrounding data sharing, and levers and barriers of effective data sharing.

The findings suggest that, at the time of the survey (late 2009), arrangements involving the sharing of either anonymised or personalised data were being widely used by CSPs to prevent and reduce crime. In general, personalised information sharing arrangements were perceived to be working effectively. In comparison, some anonymised information sharing arrangements - particularly the sharing of data on assault related attendances at Emergency Departments - may require further development in order to become widely effective tools for violence and crime reduction.