Research and analysis

Child poverty transitions: exploring the routes into and out of poverty 2009 to 2012

This research explores how children move into and out of poverty, using data from 2009 to 2012.

Documents

Child poverty transitions: exploring the routes into and out of poverty 2009 to 2012

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Summary: Child poverty transitions: exploring the routes into and out of poverty 2009 to 2012

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Detail

This research uses data from large-scale social surveys to explore how children move into and out of poverty. It helps us to understand the characteristics and events associated with families that move into and out of poverty.

The research provides our first analysis of movements into and out of child poverty using data after the recession.

It makes use of the Understanding Society survey.

It builds on work undertaken before the recession based on the British Household Panel Survey and brings the evidence up to date.

The findings from this research have already informed the Child Poverty Strategy 2014-17 published on 26 June 2014. They will continue to support the Child Poverty Unit’s ongoing work advising ministers on how to define, reduce and end child poverty.

To provide a comprehensive picture of child poverty in the UK, we have also published statistics on

Authors: Chris Lord, Dr. Matt Barnes and Jenny Chanfreau (NatCen)