Policy paper

A Summary of Findings from the Consultation on Legislation on Identity Cards

This publication was published under the 2001 to 2005 Labour government

This document contains the following information: A Summary of Findings from the Consultation on Legislation on Identity Cards.

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Identity Cards: A Summary of Findings from the Consultation on Legislation on Identity Cards - Full Text (PDF)

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This document contains the following information: This publication sets out the responses to the Home Office consultation paper, issued in April 2004 (Cm 6178, ISBN 0101617828), which set out the text of the Government’s draft Identity Cards Bill, along with accompanying explanatory notes, regulatory and race equality impact assessments.

Responses to the consultation exercise, which ended in July 2004, are given from the general public and a wide variety of organisations, including legal bodies, local government, trade unions, organisations representing ethnic minorities, gypsies and travellers and refugees, police organisations, business organisations, and the Information Commissioner.

The document also sets out the findings from other research, focus groups and external events undertaken to gauge public attitudes towards the Government’s proposals for identify cards.

The Government’s draft Bill will now be reviewed in the light of these consultation responses, as well as the recommendations made by the House of Commons Home Affairs Select Committee in their report (HCP 130-I, session 2003-04, ISBN 0215019059) published in July 2004.

This Command Paper was laid before Parliament by a Government Minister by Command of Her Majesty. Command Papers are considered by the Government to be of interest to Parliament but are not required to be presented by legislation.