Press release

Results of Diamond Jubilee Civic Honours Competition announced

The government today announced the results of the Civic Honours competition in honour of Her Majesty The Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

Chelmsford, Perth and St Asaph have been awarded the right to call themselves a city, while Armagh will from now on have a Lord Mayor.

The awards have been made by The Queen on advice from the Deputy Prime Minister and Lord President of the Privy Council, Nick Clegg. The award of city status or a Lord Mayoralty is an honour bestowed by The Queen only on rare occasions.

The decision to award a new city in England, Scotland and Wales, and a Lord Mayoralty in Northern Ireland, was made in recognition of the significance of every part of the United Kingdom in the Diamond Jubilee year; and reflects the high quality of the bids submitted.

The Deputy Prime Minister said:

Congratulations to Armagh, Chelmsford, Perth and St Asaph who have been granted these rare honours from a field of exceptional entrants. Across the United Kingdom, I have been moved by the pride and passion which people have shown in putting their nominations forward.

The standard of application was very high, and those who missed out should not be downhearted.  I hope the competition has given the residents of all of the places which applied a sense of civic pride, of collective ownership and of community spirit.

The Queen formally confers the titles of city status and Lord Mayoralty by Letters Patent in due course.

The awards of city status and Lord Mayoralty or Provostship are purely honorific and confer no additional powers, functions or funding. The last civic honours competition was held in 2002 to mark the Golden Jubilee when Preston, Stirling, Newport, Lisburn and Newry were awarded city status and Exeter was awarded a Lord Mayoralty.

Notes to editors

  1. Neither city status nor Lord Mayoralty has ever been a right to be claimed by places fulfilling a list of criteria, as this might devalue the honour. The Queen’s decision, made on Ministerial advice, will be final and no reasons will be given for applicants’ success or failure in the competition. Local authorities will be sent brief comments on their entries. 
  2. The government announced in January 2010 that The Queen had agreed a competition for city status and Lord Mayoralty or Lord Provostship should be held to mark Her Diamond Jubilee, and the competition was formally launched on 1 December 2010.
  3. The full list of towns and areas that applied for city status was announced by Mark Harper, the Minister for Political and Constitutional Reform, on 6 June 2011 as follows:
    Bolton
    Bournemouth
    Chelmsford
    Colchester
    Coleraine
    Corby
    Craigavon
    Croydon
    Doncaster
    Dorchester
    Dudley
    Gateshead
    Goole
    Luton
    Medway
    Middlesbrough
    Milton Keynes
    Perth
    Reading
    Southend
    St Asaph
    St Austell 
    Stockport
    Tower Hamlets
    Wrexham

  4. The cities that applied for a Lord Mayoralty were:
    Armagh
    Cambridge
    Derby
    Gloucester
    Lancaster
    Newport (Gwent)
    Peterborough
    Salford
    Southampton
    St Albans
    Sunderland
    Wakefield

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