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Low carbon city report focus on Johor Bahru, Malaysia

A Southeast Asia Regional Prosperity Fund project focusing on low carbon cities in Southeast Asia recently produced a high quality study and report for Malaysia and Indonesia.

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The Economics of Low Carbon Cities report
The Economics of Low Carbon Cities report launched in Johor Bahru, Malaysia

A Southeast Asia Regional Prosperity Fund project focusing on low carbon cities in Southeast Asia recently produced a high quality study and report for Malaysia and Indonesia.

The Malaysian component of the study had their report launch on 24 June in the pilot city of Johor Bahru in the southern part of Peninsular Malaysia bordering Singapore. The study on “The Economics of Low Carbon Cities: A Mini-Stern Review for Johor Bahru and Pasir Gudang, Malaysia” focussed on Iskandar Malaysia and considered the changes in the relationship between energy and development in this rapidly growing metropolitan region in the country. The report aimed to review the cost and effectiveness of a wide range of efficient, renewable and low carbon energy options that can be applied in different sectors in the two chosen urban centres (Johor Bahru and Pasir Gudang).

The project implementer was the University of Leeds, via the Centre for Low Carbon Futures (CFLCF), and was ably supported by the Iskandar Regional Development Authority (IRDA) in undertaking this one year study. The British High Commission Kuala Lumpur sent key representatives from the Climate Change and UK Trade & Investment (UKTI) teams to attend the event where our Climate Change and Energy Attaché Muru Loganathan chaired one of the sessions at the launch seminar.

The CFLCF are renowned for working on similar reports in other parts of the world. This Malaysian study forms part of a growing series of Climate Smart Cities reports that so far also includes Palembang (Indonesia), Calcutta (India), Lima (Peru), four UK cities, and will in August start its next study in Brazil.

We hope that the report will be the rallying call for the local community, policymakers, implementation agencies and investors to commit themselves to carrying out the recommendations towards establishing Iskandar Malaysia as a sustainable, green economic corridor.

The document can be downloaded here:

Further Information

For more details about the study, visit their website at www.climatesmartcities.org or contact Muru Loganathan at Muru.Loganathan@fco.gov.uk.

Published 17 July 2014