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Growth week: Tackling the hardest questions

This news article was published under the 2010 to 2015 Conservative and Liberal Democrat coalition government

Growth Week will bring together leading academics and policy makers from both the north and the south to discuss key growth issues facing developing countries.

How can mobile phones help the worlds poorest? Will Africa’s vast wealth in natural resources help or hinder its development? What does increasing urbanisation means for models of economic growth in developing countries?

These are just some of the questions the International Growth Centre (IGC) will be exploring during this week’s Growth Week at the London School of Economics.

Growth Week will bring together leading academics and policy makers from both the north and the south to discuss key growth issues facing developing countries.

Ideas to raise and sustain growth, a critical factor in reducing poverty, have challenged researchers and policy makers for many years. Economic growth in Africa and South Asia is one of today’s great challenges. In the last five decades, only 13 countries have sustained growth rates above 7% for over 25 years.

Experience suggests that a one-size-fits-all solution to the wide range of challenges facing developing countries has been unsuccessful. Each country faces a constantly shifting and evolving set of complex problems that can make the development of sound economic policy incredibly difficult.

In answer to this DFID established the IGC; a network of world class academics that undertakes research and provides demand driven, independent, advice to developing countries to assist them in developing their growth strategies.

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Growth Week is a unique opportunity to bring everyone engaged in the IGC together. These meetings greatly deepen the collective understanding of some of the biggest challenges facing development today, enabling better policy and bigger impact tomorrow.

You can be a part of this as there are a number of public lectures being held at the LSE by the IGC.

If you can’t attend but are still interested to watch the lectures please visit the IGC website for webcasts of the lectures.