Consultation outcome

The future of the right to request time to train policy

This consultation was published under the 2010 to 2015 Conservative and Liberal Democrat coalition government

This consultation has concluded

Download the full outcome

Detail of outcome

Summarises the outcome of the consultation and the government’s response. Also summarises public responses to the consultation.

Original consultation

This consultation ran from to

Summary

Consultation on the future of the right to request time to train legislation and whether it should be repealed, retained or extended.

Documents

Time to train? Consultation on the future of the right to request time to train policy

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Amser i hyfforddi? Ymgynghoriad ynghylch dyfodol y polisi ar hawl i ofyn am amser i hyfforddi

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request an accessible format.

If you use assistive technology (eg a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email enquiries@bis.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Consultation description

Consultation seeking views about the future of the ‘right to request time to train’ legislation and whether the right should be repealed, retained for large organisations or extended to small and medium sized organisations as planned.

There was a good response to the consultation, from businesses, public sector organisations, professional bodies, individuals, employer representative bodies, trades unions and staff associations, and others. 147 responses were received by the closing date. These responses revealed an extremely polarised position between those supporting retention of the right seeing it as a key way in which individuals could be supported to access training and those wanting to see the right repealed seeing it as an unhelpful and unnecessary burden on business.