Robinson R22 Beta, G-SUMT, 27 May 2005

Robinson R22 Beta, G-SUMT

Summary:

After a short local flight lasting about 30 minutes, the pilot in the right cockpit seat made his approach to Sherburn in Elmet Aerodrome. On departure the wind had been about 11 kt from 030?and the pilot made his approach to the right and parallel with Runway 06. The weather was good although the visibility was becoming hazy. The pilot descended to about 15 feet agl over the aerodrome and hover taxied to his intended landing area where the helicopter crashed. He subsequently recalled that there were no other aircraft in the area and that the wind sock appeared to be “Full”. However, from that time he could not recall anything else until he regained consciousness in the wreckage of the helicopter. There was a R22 rated pilot seated in the left seat. Although the dual controls were fitted, he confirmed that his hands and feet were clear of the controls at the time of the accident. His recollection was that the pilot flew a normal approach and was coming to a halt nearly into wind at about five feet agl when the helicopter started to turn to the left. He was then aware of a rapidly increasing turn rate but could not be certain about the direction. The helicopter struck the ground hard moving backwards. The aerodrome was closed at the time so there was no Air/ Ground Operator on duty. However, one of the resident fixed wing flying instructors was walking in the area and saw part of the accident. He had watched the helicopter make an approach on a heading of about 060º to a hover height of about six feet agl and then hover taxi in the same direction. He then looked away but when he looked back, the helicopter had pitched nose up and was yawed to the right. It then appeared to slide back to contact the ground tail first. The witness estimated the surface wind at the time as 030º/ 12 to 15 kt. This wind direction would not normally result in turbulence on the aerodrome. Enquiries with a type training organisation confirmed that the anti-torque pedals on the R22 are very effective and that left pedal would be used to counter any yaw caused by the application of collective lever as the helicopter came to a hover. Additionally, there would have been a wind induced left yaw as the helicopter came to the hover on a heading of about 060º The pilot subsequently confirmed that there had been no unserviceabilities with the helicopter on the flight prior to the final hover. After a short local flight lasting about 30 minutes, the pilot in the right cockpit seat made his approach to Sherburn in Elmet Aerodrome. On departure the wind had been about 11 kt from 030?and the pilot made his approach to the right and parallel with Runway 06. The weather was good although the visibility was becoming hazy. The pilot descended to about 15 feet agl over the aerodrome and hover taxied to his intended landing area where the helicopter crashed. He subsequently recalled that there were no other aircraft in the area and that the wind sock appeared to be “Full”. However, from that time he could not recall anything else until he regained consciousness in the wreckage of the helicopter. There was a R22 rated pilot seated in the left seat. Although the dual controls were fitted, he confirmed that his hands and feet were clear of the controls at the time of the accident. His recollection was that the pilot flew a normal approach and was coming to a halt nearly into wind at about five feet agl when the helicopter started to turn to the left. He was then aware of a rapidly increasing turn rate but could not be certain about the direction. The helicopter struck the ground hard moving backwards. The aerodrome was closed at the time so there was no Air/ Ground Operator on duty. However, one of the resident fixed wing flying instructors was walking in the area and saw part of the accident. He had watched the helicopter make an approach on a heading of about 060º to a hover height of about six feet agl and then hover taxi in the same dir

Download report:

Robinson R22 Beta, G-SUMT 8-05.pdf (57.37 kb)

Help us improve GOV.UK

Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.