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  1. Service manual
  2. Accessibility and assisted digital
  3. Publishing information about your service's accessibility

Use this format if you’re creating an accessibility page for a GOV.UK service (that’s a service published on a .service.gov.uk subdomain).

Publish the accessibility page at a url within the .service.gov.uk subdomain - and link to it from the footer of every page of your service (not including your GOV.UK start point).

There’s a different format if you’re creating an accessibility statement for a public sector website that’s not part of GOV.UK.

If your GOV.UK service:

  • went into public beta before 23 September 2018, you must publish your accessibility page by 23 September 2020
  • moved into public beta after 23 September 2018, you must publish your accessibility page by 23 September 2019
  • will move into public beta on or after 23 September 2019, you must publish your accessibility page as soon as you move into public beta

Publishing an accessibility page is part of meeting the new accessibility regulations that apply to public sector websites and apps. The full name of the new regulations is the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

Accessibility for [service name]

[Note: This is a sample accessibility page for a fictional service on GOV.UK. It contains sample wording and guidance on what to include.

Don’t duplicate information in the main GOV.UK accessibility statement.

This service is part of the wider GOV.UK website. There’s a separate accessibility statement for the main GOV.UK website.

This page only contains information about the [insert service name] service, available at [insert name of .service.gov.uk subdomain].

Using this service

[Note: use this section to provide a brief, general overview of what the service allows disabled users to do. Summarise the detail covered in the ‘Technical information about this service’s accessibility’ section. If you’re not confident that something is accurate, leave it out. If you’re not confident enough to say anything specific here, leave this section out completely.]

This service is run by [name of department or organisation]. We want as many people as possible to be able to use this service. For example, that means you should be able to:

  • change colours, contrast levels and fonts
  • zoom in up to 300% without the text spilling off the screen
  • get from the start of the service to the end using just a keyboard
  • get from the start of the service to the end using speech recognition software
  • listen to the service using a screen reader (including the most recent versions of JAWS, NVDA and VoiceOver)

We’ve also made the text in the service as simple as possible to understand.

AbilityNet has advice on making your device easier to use if you have a disability.

How accessible this service is

[Note: use this section to provide information that a disabled user can act on. Use the evaluation covered in ‘Technical information about this service’s accessibility’ as your starting point, but talk about anything that might cause disabled users a significant problem - whether or not it falls below WCAG 2.1 AA standard. Try to list in order of most impact to least impact.]

Some people may find parts of this service difficult to use:

  • at one point we display location information on a map - however, there’s also a postcode lookup tool that’s accessible to visually impaired users using assistive technology
  • we may ask you to physically sign a document we send to you - however, there’s also an option that lets you confirm your agreement over the phone
  • there’s an instructional video inside the service that doesn’t have captions (it’s an old video, and we’ll add captions when we re-shoot it)

What to do if you have difficulty using this service

If you have difficulty using this service, contact us by:

  • email [email address]
  • call [phone number]
  • [add any other contact details]

As part of providing this service, we may need to send you messages or documents. We’ll ask you how you want us to send messages or documents to you, but contact us if you need them in a different format. For example large print, audio recording or braille.

Reporting accessibility problems with this service

We’re always looking to improve the accessibility of this service. If you find any problems that aren’t listed on this page or think we’re not meeting accessibility requirements, contact: [provide details of how to report these issues to your organisation, and contact details for the unit or person responsible for dealing with these reports].

Enforcement procedure

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is responsible for enforcing the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018 (the ‘accessibility regulations’). If you’re not happy with how we respond to your complaint, contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS).

[Note: if your organisation is based in Northern Ireland, refer users who want to complain to the Equalities Commission for Northern Ireland (ECNI) instead of the EASS and EHRC.]

Contacting us by phone or visiting us in person

We provide a text relay service for people who are deaf, hearing impaired or have a speech impediment.

Our offices have audio induction loops, or if you contact us before your visit we can arrange a British Sign Language (BSL) interpreter to help you complete the service in person.

Find out how to contact us [add link to contact details page].

Technical information about this service’s accessibility

[Note: this form of wording is legally required, so don’t change it.]

[Name of organisation] is committed to making this service accessible, in accordance with the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

[Note: say that the service is fully compliant if it meets WCAG 2.1 AA standard in full. Say that it’s partially compliant if it meets most requirements of the WCAG 2.1 AA standard. If it doesn’t meet most requirements of the WCAG 2.1 AA standard, say that it’s not compliant. There’s a legally required form of wording here, so don’t change it. The 3 options are as follows:]

This service is fully compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard.

This service is partially compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard, due to the non-compliances listed below.

This service is not compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard. The non-accessible parts are listed below.

[Note: delete the options that don’t apply.]

Non accessible content

[Note: if the service is fully compliant with the WCAG 2.1 AA standard, you can leave the ‘Non accessible content’ section out.

Otherwise, don’t change the ’Non accessible content’ heading or the ‘The content listed below is non-accessible for the following reasons’ sentence - they’re legally required.

Don’t change the ‘Non compliance with the accessibility regulations’, ‘Disproportionate burden’ and ‘Content that’s not within the scope of the accessibility regulations’ subheadings: they’re also legally required.]

The content listed below is non-accessible for the following reasons.

Non compliance with the accessibility regulations

[Note: In this subsection, list:

  • accessibility problems
  • which of the WCAG 2.1 AA success criteria the problem fails on
  • when you plan to fix the problem

Don’t include any problems where you’re claiming disproportionate burden, or where the problem is outside the scope of the regulations (those should go in the subsections below).]

We use diagrams in the service. For example, to show users how to take a photograph of themselves so we can create an identification document for them.

Some of these diagrams don’t have a text alternative, so the information in them isn’t available to people using a screen reader. This doesn’t meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.1.1 (non-text content).

We plan to add text alternatives for all diagrams by September 2020. If we add new diagrams, we’ll make sure they meet accessibility standards.

Disproportionate burden

[Note: in this subsection list:

  • any accessibility problems you’re claiming would be a disproportionate burden to fix
  • which of the WCAG 2.1 AA success criteria the problem fails on

Bear in mind that something which is a disproportionate burden now won’t necessarily be a disproportionate burden forever. If the circumstances change, your ability to claim disproportionate burden may change too.

If you’re not claiming disproportionate burden for anything, leave this subsection out.

There’s guidance if you’re not sure whether you should be making a disproportionate burden claim.]

Content that’s not within the scope of the accessibility regulations

[Note: in this subsection list:

  • any accessibility problems that fall outside the scope of the accessibility regulations
  • which of the WCAG 2.1 AA success criteria the problem fails on

If there aren’t any problems outside the scope of the accessibility regulations, leave this subsection out.]

How we tested this service

The service was last tested on [date] and was checked for compliance with WCAG 2.1 AA. The test was carried out by [add name of organisation that carried out testing, or indicate that you did your own testing].

You can read the full accessibility audit report [add link to report].

What we’re doing to improve accessibility

[Note: publishing a roadmap is optional. It’s a good idea to publish one if you want to be specific about the order you’re planning to tackle accessibility issues, and there isn’t space to do so on this page.]

Our roadmap [add link to roadmap] includes information about how and when we plan to improve accessibility on this service.

[Note: don’t change the wording about when the page was prepared.]

This page was prepared on [date when it was first published]. It was last updated on [date when it was last updated].

Published by:
Accessibility community
Last update:

Clarified deadlines for services moving into public beta on or after 23 September 2019.

  1. Added the dates by which you'll need to publish your accessibility page, depending on your circumstances.

  2. Guidance first published