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HMRC internal manual

Insurance Policyholder Taxation Manual

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HM Revenue & Customs
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Personal portfolio bonds: calculation method: example

Facts

Mr White took out a life policy at the start of ‘insurance year’ 1 with a premium of £5,000. During year 4 he made a withdrawal of £3,500 and during year 7 a further withdrawal of £2,750. Further premium of £2,000 paid in year 9. Policy surrendered in year 11 for £20,500.

Gains on ‘excess events’

Under the rules described in IPTM3560, gains arise on ‘excess events’ at the ends of ‘insurance years’ 4 and 7 as follows:

Year 4: £2,500 on the withdrawal of £3,500 (that is, £3,500 - 4 x 0.05 x £5,000)

Year 7: £2,000 on the withdrawal of £2,750 (that is, £2,750 - 3 x 0.05 x £5,000)

Calculation of annual PPB gains

Year
y Premiums paid, years 1 to end year y (A) Cumulative amount of PPB excesses for years 1 to (y - 1) (B) Aggregate part surrender gains for years 1 to (y - 1) (C) PPB gain for year y =
15%(A + B - C)          
           
  1 5,000 Nil Nil 750
  2 5,000 750 Nil 862
  3 5,000 1,612 Nil 991
  4 5,000 2,603 Nil 1,140
  5 5,000 3,743 2,500 936
  6 5,000 4,679 2,500 1,076
  7 5,000 5,755 2,500 1,238
  8 5,000 6,993 4,500 1,123
  9 7,000 8,116 4,500 1,592
  10 7,000 9,708 4,500 1,831
  11 7,000 11,539 4,500 No gain

These calculations must be carried out in full even if year 1 ends before 6 April 2000, the date on which the PPB rules took effect. But the PPB gains are only taxable for ‘insurance years’ ending on or after 6 April 2000. Then each PPB gain is treated as arising on a chargeable event (a ‘personal portfolio bond event’) occurring at the end of the ‘insurance year’ and is taxable in the tax year in which the event occurred. No PPB gain can arise in the final year.