Rating Manual section 6 part 3: valuation of all property classes

Section 960: local authority sports centres, tennis centres, swimming pools and leisure centres

This publication is intended for Valuation Officers. It may contain links to internal resources that are not available through this version.

1. Scope

This section deals solely with local authority sports and leisure centres including tennis centres that are operated on a non-commercial basis. Private sports and leisure centres are a separate class, covered by RM Section 6 Part 3 S965. Tennis centres are covered in RM Section 6 Part 3 S1040.

2. List Description and Special Category Code

List Description

Sports and Leisure Centre SCAT Code: 257(Dry only) Primary Description Code LC2

SCAT Code: 258(Wet and Dry) Primary Description Code LC2

Swimming Pool and Premises SCAT Code: 272 Primary Description Code LC6

Tennis Centre SCAT Code 277 Primary Description Code LC7

3. Responsible Teams

This is a specialist class and responsibility for valuation will lie with the specialist teams within each business unit. Queries of a complex nature arising from the valuation of individual properties should be referred to the NSU class facilitator via the class co-ordination team (CCT)

4. Co-ordination

The CCT has overall responsibility for the co-ordination of this class.

The CCT is responsible for the approach to, the accuracy and consistency of valuations of Local authority sports centres and will produce practice notes outlining the valuation basis for revaluation and provide advice as necessary during the life of a rating list.

Caseworkers have a responsibility to

  • Follow the advice in this section and in the relevant practice note.

  • Not to depart from any subsequent advice given in relation to appeals or maintenance work during the life of a list without approval from the CCT or NSU technical advisor

  • Seek advice from the CCT or NSU technical advisor should issues arise which are not covered in this practice note.

5.1 Sports centres and swimming pools are sui –generis classes and consequently, as a general rule, only evidence relating to hereditaments in the same mode or category of use is pertinent.

See Scottish and Newcastle (Retail) Ltd v Williams (VO) RA 119 and the subsequent Court of Appeal decision –Williams (VO) v Scottish and Newcastle Retail and Allied domecq.

And Dawkins (VO) v Royal Leamington SpaBC and Warwickshire County Council (1961) RVR 291.

See Rating Manual: Section 3 - Part 2 paragraph 9.2 and appendix 1 thereof for further guidance on mode and category of use.

5.2The leading case on the valuation approach to local authority sports and leisure centres is

Eastbourne Borough Council and Wealden District Council v Allen (VO) RA 2001 P273

The Lands Tribunal (Upper Tribunal-Lands Chamber) valued two local authority leisure centres on the contractors basis and rejected the ratepayers’ valuation based on a percentage of receipts including subsidy provided to pay the outgoings. A fundamental difficulty with the ratepayers’ method was that there was no apparent reason why the amount that the hypothetical landlord and tenant would agree on as a rent should be related in some identifiable way , or at all, to the totality of the outgoings, and although the contractors basis has its limitations , it was a method with a clear intellectual justification, it was long established and widely understood by rating valuers, and it was used for a wide range of local authority hereditaments for which there was no rental evidence or for which a profits basis valuation could not be made. The Tribunal rejected the contention of the ratepayers that an adjustment be made at stage 5 of the contractors basis to reflect ability to pay holding that each of the appellant authorities attached considerable importance to the services provided by its leisure centre as a popular recreational facility for its residents and would find the money to pay the rent rather than close the facilities. The Tribunal also rejected comparison with private leisure centres as their assessments /rents provided no indication of what a local authority would be prepared to pay in rent for a leisure centre it operated for socio-economic reasons.

6. Survey Requirements

6.1 Unit of Assessment

(i)It is essential that prior to embarking upon a valuation of a sports and leisure centre the hereditament is correctly identified. It should not be assumed, for example that a shop, café, beauty clinic, crèche, physiotherapist, clothing /equipment or other commercial undertaking within the confines of the centre are occupied by the same undertaking that occupies the remainder of the centre. Many centres are now managed by trusts established specifically to take advantage of the fiscal advantages that such a status brings with it, not least partial or total relief from rating liability. However as to run a commercial undertaking such as a shop or café would undermine their charitable status a separate legal entity (a trading company) is created to undertake the leisure centres commercial undertakings and that company which, subject to the usual rules relating to the hereditament and paramount occupation, will be the rateable occupier of the café/shop which will fall to be separately assessed. It is also possible that an entirely independent operator or operators may be in occupation of parts of the centre and these again should be fully investigated to ensure the correct unit of assessment is identified and valued. Further guidance can be found in the Rating Manual Section 3 - Part 1.

(ii) In recent years some sports and leisure centres have been built as part of a complex aimed at providing a number of public services under one roof. In addition to sports centres this may include libraries , local authority offices , police station, health centre etc. The rateable occupier of the sports centre may not be the same as that occupying the library (i.e. the sports centre may be occupied by a trust) but where it is the same occupier it is considered that the occupation of the sports centre is for a totally different purpose to that of a library or local authority officesand consequently the sports centre will fall to be separately assessed.

Due consideration needs to be given to issues around the lifting of the corporate veil where Trusts and Local authorities are concerned. The guidance given in Rating Manual Section 3 - Part 1 Para 6 should be strictly adhered to.

Some local authorities have management agreements with private companies who run the centre on a day to day basis. However it is considered that in these circumstances the local authority usually remain in paramount occupation.

7. Survey Capture

Centres should be measured to GIA.

The standard of survey should be such as to enable a valuation on the contractors basis to be carried out. The referencing needs of this class of hereditament are inextricably linked to the demands imposed by the need to calculate the size of the substitute hereditament. In view of the requirements of the complex valuation scheme associated with this class a separate referencing guide has been produced as Appendix 1 to this section, and an aide memoire in tabular form is included as Appendix 2.

8. Valuation Approach

8.1 In the absence of reliable open market rental evidence local authority sports and leisure centres fall to be valued on a contractors basis. Whereas with new centres (built post 1/4/2015)and International standard 50m pools it is the actual hereditament which is valued, in respect of older buildings the substitute hereditament approach is utilised. The approach is, firstly to calculate the size of the substitute hereditament, and then to value the substitute hereditament using the contractors basis.

The substitute building approach addresses the superfluity issues which can arise in older sports and leisure centres, and impacts on the referencing requirements of the class. More details are contained in the referencing guide (Appendix 1) and the notes for case workers (Appendix 3).

8.2 The size and nature of the substitute building is derived from the application of guidance available from Sport England, the Amateur Swimming Association and other sporting bodies. This guidance is sufficiently detailed to enable accurate assessment of the size and nature of a substitute hereditament to be calculated.

8.3 The calculations required to arrive at the size of the substitute building are contained in Appendix 3. However the calculator sheet, which is an inherent part of the valuation spreadsheet for this class held on the Non Bulk Server, incorporates all the formula necessary to arrive at the GIA of the notional substitute and no manual calculation is required.

8.4 Valuation Method

In centres operated by or for local authorities the primary purpose of occupation is not to make a profit but to provide an amenity for residents in the area for social and economic reasons .A very small number of sports and leisure centres, although owned by local authorities, are let to and operated by independent “not for profit “ charitable organisations. It is unlikely that the level of rents payable under such arrangements are a reliable indicator of the rent that would be negotiated between the hypothetical tenant and landlord in an open market scenario as envisaged under the rating hypothesis. Where such circumstances arise full details should be obtained and forwarded to the relevant specialist in NSU Civics.

8.5 The Application of the Contractors Basis

The concept, principles and practical application of the contractors basis of valuation are detailed in RM section 4 part 3. The detailed consideration of the application of the contractors basisas it applies to local authority leisure centres is contained within the practice note for the Rating List concerned.

8.6 Sports and Leisure Centres at Local Authority Schools

8.7Dual use sports and leisure centres co-located with state schools are quite a common occurrence. Such centres are normally used by the school during the day in term time, or have large block bookings during school hours. The centres are usually open to the public in the evenings and weekends and school holidays, with little or no availability in school hours. Often the centre is run by a joint board, comprised of representatives of the Education Authority and the Authority responsible for leisure provision, and of the school.

8.8 In circumstances where different authorities (or the governing body of the school in the case of academies) are in paramount occupation of the school and leisure centre respectively the two will always constitute separate assessments. However where in unitary authorities areas the school and leisure centre are in the occupation of the same authority it maybe that one assessment is appropriate.

This was considered in the case of Trafford Metropolitan Borough Council v Pollard (VO) 2007 – RA 49, LT

Here the Lands Tribunal (Upper Tribunal Lands Chamber) held that a School and Sports Centre were to be treated as a single hereditament, even though they were managed separately under different statutory powers. The LT accepted that these were ‘… important considerations which argued quite strongly in favour of treating them as separate hereditaments …’, but overall, other factors led it to conclude that a single hereditament was appropriate. The most significant considerations included:

  • whether the two parts were capable of separate occupation;

  • the nominal purpose for which the two parts of the site were used are as a school and as a sports and leisure centre;

  • the activities comprehended in the use of each part of the site;

  • the extent to which parts of the valuation officer’s school hereditament were used by the public and the sports centre was used by the school;

  • the history of the proposal for dual use facilities;

  • how the sports centre was financed

  • the separate management of the two parts under different statutory powers

  • the degree of physical separation between the two parts.

The most significant considerations were that the sports centre and the all-weather pitch were conceived as dual use facilities and were operated as such, there was a significant degree of interaction between the two parts of the site, and the concept of this interaction was a fundamental part of the development of the sports centre

Mr George Bartlett QC (president), said:

“….it is a question of fact and degree for the decision maker (valuation officer, valuation tribunal or the Lands Tribunal) whether property in one occupation should be entered in the lists as one or more than one hereditament, it follows that there can be no more conclusive tests for determining the issue when it arises.”

He went on to determine:

“It is, of course, the case, that the two parts of the site can readily be identified as a school on the one hand and a sports centre on the other and that they are managed separately under different statutory powers. These, in my view, are important considerations, which argue quite strongly in favour of treating them as separate hereditaments. On balance, however, in the light of all the considerations I think that counsel for the ratepayer council is right in contending that the degree of functional connection between the two parts of the site is such that the whole site is properly to be treated as a single hereditament.”

8.9 Whether 1 assessment or two, where there is significant school use it will be necessary to determine the appropriate de-capitalisation rate(higher or lower) to adopt when applying the contractors basis. This is determined by the provisions of the The Non-Domestic Rating (Miscellaneous Provisions) (No. 2) Regulations 1989 (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2000 (as amended) which states -

…educational hereditament” means a hereditament which— (a) is constructed or adapted for use for the purposes of—

i) a school;

ii) a university;

and which is wholly or mainly so used; or …

Thus

Where a sports centre is assessed together with a school it maybe that, notwithstanding the sports centre is available for use by the general public out of school hours, when looked at together with the school buildings it is wholly or mainly used as an educational hereditament and thus falls to be valued using the lower de-capitalisation rate

8.10 Where separately assessed it is unlikely the application of the lower de-capitalisation rate will be appropriate. Although most centres can be considered to be constructed for the purpose of a school they are unlikely to fall within the wording ‘wholly or mainly so used’. Whether the hereditament is wholly or mainly used for the purposes of an educational establishment (i.e. the school) is essentially a test of use defined by time period, and since most centres are open to the public for longer hours than the school use then the higher rate will be appropriate to the hereditament in most cases. Hours of use by the public and school can usually be obtained from the centre management. In cases of exceptionally high intensity of use by the school then the lower de-capitalisation rate may be appropriate. Such cases are likely to be the exception rather than the rule.

8.11 For the avoidance of doubt this section is not intended to apply to ad hoc or regular (or occasional) use of a school hall, gymnasium or other facilities for sporting activities by a club or by the public, in such cases the school is likely to remain in paramount occupation.

9. Valuation Support

A valuation spreadsheet with calculator page(for computing the size of the notional substitute building) is available on the Non Bulk server and must be used for undertaking valuations of this class of property for rating purposes whenever required.

Rating manual - Section 960: Local Authority Sports Centres, Tennis Centres, Swimming Pools and Leisure Centres

APPENDIX 1 Referencing Guide

This class of hereditament is valued by reference to GIA, but since the costs of different parts vary considerably, and space standards have changed over time, it is necessary to identify the areas of different functional parts of each hereditament. Over a number of Rating Lists, agreement has been reached on a standardised approach which identifies required areas rather than actual areas. This approach does not apply to newer hereditaments, hereditaments which comprise (wholly or primarily) ice rinks and/or bowling centres. Since this standardised approach cannot be applied to all hereditaments and may not be appropriate indefinitely, full referencing of all hereditaments in this class is required. An aide-memoire is to be found in Appendix 2 to this Section.

Referencing requirements

In all cases the overall GIA of the individual buildings in the hereditament (including individually all outbuildings) will always be required as of necessity as will the date of completion of the centre.

A. Referencing and Valuation requirements for wet areas

1. The Main Swimming Pool.

(For leisure pools see below) the referencing requirement for pools is the length of the main pool, together with the width (whether an actual measurement, or the number of marked lanes), and the maximum depth.

Notes on Pool Sizes: Modern pools are usually one of two standard lengths 25m, or 50m (sometimes referred to as Olympic Length - there is only a small number of Olympic pools in Great Britain at present although these have increased partly as a consequence of London hosting the 2012 Olympic games). When considering the size of a replacement pool the length of the pool will be one of these two measurements except where the existing pool is shorter than 25m when the existing length should be utilised.

Pools range in width from 4 lanes (9m width) (usually in smaller rural locations) upwards.

2. The Teaching Pool.

Most centres with a main pool will also have a teaching pool used for lessons and less confident swimmers that issmaller and shallower than the main pool.The referencing requirement here is the length and width of the existing pool.

Note on Teaching Pools: The modern trend is for the teaching pool to occupy a space at the foot of the main pool within the same hall, and for the teaching pool to be either 13m long, or equal to the width of the main pool (if the width of the main pool is greater). The standard width for teaching pools is normally 7.5m.

3. Secondary Pools.

Some swimming complexes have a second main pool (as well as the main pool and teaching pool). The referencing requirement is the same as the main pool i.e. length, width, and maximum depth.

4. Leisure Pools.

The referencing requirement here is the water area of the pool. Leisure pools are normally irregularly shaped and accurate measurement is likely to require scaling from plans as well as check measurements. Caseworkers should also inquire whether the Management of the hereditament can supply the water area of the leisure pool. Flumes which are part of leisure pools should be noted but do not need to be measured. Where flumes have been added to conventional pools see note 8 below.

5. Diving Pools.

For diving pools the referencing requirement is the length and width of the pool together with a note of the number of the type and height of the diving boards together with a note of which dimension is that of the board side of the pool (because of the need for a wider pool surround). It is also necessary to ascertain the location of the nearest alternative diving pool.

Note on Diving Pools: Diving pools are relatively specialised and have a greater health and safety requirement due to the possibility of back injuries. Consequently many modern pools are constructed without diving facilities. Nonetheless diving pools also have several other uses, e.g. sub aqua clubs, water polo clubs etc. use them. Diving pools may be provided with adjustable floors which make them even more adaptable.

6. Abnormal Pools.

For any pool other than those covered above the referencing requirement is for the water area and the surround area, and the maximum depth.

7. Ancillary space to pools.

(All to be measured separately, but no need to be distinguished between main, teaching and diving):

  • Surrounds

  • First Aid Room

  • Pool store(s)

  • Wet side changing (including tiled lobby areas and showers)

  • Wet side WCs (including tiled lobby areas)

  • Wet side plant rooms housing wave machines water treatment and heating plant

  • Wet side plant rooms housing air handling plant.

If there is a single plant room housing both types of plant a judgement should be made about the proportion of space occupied by water treatment/heating plant. If air handling plant serves both the wet and dry sides of the hereditament, no apportionment of air handling plant-room space between wet and dry is needed.

8. Flumes.

Those flumes which are built as part of a leisure pool are reflected and do not need referencing. A separate addition is made for the cost of flumes added to conventional pools. The referencing requirement in these circumstances is the linear run of the flume.

9. Saunas and Solaria.

Referencing requirement - actual areas of the rooms in use, and changing and stores specific to the facility.

Note: These areas are valued at the wet rate to reflect the plant requirements.

10. Wet Side Seating.

Referencing requirement: preferably count the number of seats, if this is impractical for some reason (eg. the seats are not fixed) measure the area reserved for wet side seating.

Note on wet side seating: Wet side seating has a higher space requirement than dry side seating, (due to the greater plant requirement for the damp air). Wet side seating may appear to be little used, but may be busy for galas or during children’s lessons.

11. Outdoor Pools.

Referencing requirements – water area and maximum depth, and measurement to GIA of all the associated buildings, including the plant rooms, and changing rooms.

B. Referencing and Valuation requirements for Ice Rinks (where a subsidiary part of the hereditament)

12. Ice rinks.

Referencing requirement is the area of the Ice and the area of the surround. Measurement of the plant rooms and changing areas is also required, in addition to ancillary areas mentioned below.

C. Referencing requirements for Dry Areas

13. Main Halls.

Provided the main hall is laid out to badminton the main referencing requirement is a count of the number of courts, together with a note of the overall dimensions.

Notes on main halls: - Most halls are considered in the industry in terms of the number of badminton courts, but there will be instances where the hall exceeds the area required for badminton for other reasons e.g. it is used for other purposes such as entertainment, or craft fairs etc., or it is primarily used for sports other than badminton. Therefore enquiry should be made of all the different uses to which the hall is (or is intended to be) put, and these uses should be noted.

See also notes on dry side seating. (sub paragraph 18 below)

14. Gymnasiums.

Referencing requirement: - the number of stations (i.e. machines), and the overall dimensions of the gym as a check.

Note on Gymnasiums: -In recent years use of exercise machines has become increasingly popular, and many older centres have converted areas gyms use (e.g. squash courts which have fallen from favour) and many centres have cramped gyms as demand for the machines is high. Gyms are just as likely to be found in wet centres as dry.

15. Multi-function rooms.

E.g. Dance Studios, aerobic rooms, and rooms that can be used for a number of less mainstream sports e.g. Table Tennis. These are uses that require a changing facility.

Referencing requirement: Area in use and note of actual or intended uses. The management should be requested to provide the maximum capacity in persons.

Note on Multi-function rooms: -Areas such as dance studios have a relatively high changing requirement compared with main halls (because a relatively high number of people can be accommodated at once).

16. Other public Rooms.

Referencing requirement: GIA in use.

Note: This applies to areas available for use by the public, which do not have a changing requirement, e.g. Crèches (for use over short periods) Meeting rooms, and rooms used for sports that do not require changing facilities e.g. snooker room.

17. Bowling Halls.

Referencing requirement: the number of rinks, and the area of the hall and stores.

Note: this does not apply to purpose built bowling centres.

18. Dry Side Seating.

Referencing requirement: the number of seats, or if impractical, area of seating.

Note on Dry side Seating: Similar considerations apply to wet side seating, except that in some centres the dry side seating may double as part of the bar area or cafe and in such instances it should be treated with the bar area.

In Halls used for important competitions there may be areas of fixed or movable seating in the hall. Fixed seating should be added separately as above, but movable seating may take up some space used at other times for general sports.

19. Squash Courts.

Referencing requirement: number of courts is all that is required – subject to the note below.

Notes on Squash Courts: In the late 1990’s the popularity of squash declined and in many centres the number of courts has been reduced by conversion to other uses, e.g. crèches, and gyms. It should be noted if there are squash courts that are unused.

20. Ancillary space to dry side.

(All to be measured separately, but no need to distinguish between main, teaching and diving):

  • First Aid Room

  • Store(s) for equipment and/or seating

  • Dry side changing (including lobby areas and showers), with a note of the number of changing spaces

  • Dry side WCs (including lobby areas)

  • Dry side plant rooms housing heating and/or air handling plant.

If the same plant room also accommodates electrical intake or generating plant, the proportion of space occupied by electrical plant should be estimated.

21. External Changing Facilities.

This means areas used for changing for outdoor sports facilities, (e.g. Football Pitches etc.). The referencing requirement is the actual area in use (including showers lobbies and toilets), and as a check the total number of spaces.

Note: Most centres will have separate changing areas for the outside pitches and sports facilities complete with separate showers. It is important to ascertain the number of spaces involved (not forgetting the referees’ etc. for local sport leagues).

D Referencing requirements for Tennis Centres/ Tennis Halls

22 Main Hall

Most tennis halls are exclusively devoted to tennis as a single use. The primary referencing requirement is the number of tennis courts together with a note of the overall dimensions.

Notes on main halls: - Similar considerations may apply to those in badminton halls, i.e. there may be instances where the hall exceeds the area required for tennis for other reasons e.g. it is used for other purposes such as entertainment. Therefore enquiry should be made of all the different uses to which the hall is (or is intended to be) put, and these uses should be noted.

See also notes on dry side seating.

23 Air –Supported Tennis Halls

Most tennis centres will have external tennis courts and in some cases some may be covered by air supported buildings. These may be of single skin polythene or polyester of single or double skin construction (More detail of the construction can be found in the VO cost guide). A note of the construction is required, together with the number of courts covered. NB this information is in addition to the information required for the court itself and the court lighting. Polythene covers (but not polyester)have a short life and can be regarded as de minimis.

E. Referencing and Valuation requirements for Cafes and Bars and Retail areas

Note: these areas occur in both wet and dry centres and, in centres with both wet and dry facilities, are apportioned in the valuation between the wet and dry areas.

24. Bar Areas.

Referencing requirement: GIA of the bar area, together with any stores and preparation areas.

25. Café Areas.

Referencing requirement: number of covers, and the area in use including preparation areas and stores.

Note: the area of preparation and seating is derived from the number of covers and this should be the preferred method, except where the area also doubles as spectator seating.

26. Retail Areas.

Referencing requirement: GIA of the shop and store area.

27. Vending Areas.

Referencing requirement: Number of covers of the associated seating and the number of vending machines. Alternatively the areas in use.

Note on vending areas: This applies to food, drink or snack vending machines especially those that have associated seating. For Example it is not intended to apply to an odd drinks machine in a corridor. Vending areas may be found in small centres that do not have a separate café, or in large centres to supplement the café.

F. Referencing and Valuation requirements for external sports facilities

Note: All external sports facilities need to be separately included not only in the valuation, but also in the calculation of the size of the substitute hereditament, to allow for the land required.

28. Tennis Courts.

Referencing Requirement - Number and nature of surfacing of the courts and whether the courts are lit, NB sports council guidelines suggest there should be two external changing spaces per court.

29. Grass Football and Hockey Pitches.

Referencing Requirement – number and size of pitches.

30. Astro-turf areas.

Referencing Requirement - Area (see also Lighting below).

31. Lighting to pitches and tennis courts.

Referencing requirement: the height of the columns, the number of lamps per column and their rating in watts.

32. Other Sports Surfaces.

Full details of any other sports facilities not included above are required.

33. Other Buildings.

Other buildings may be encountered such as sports pavilions, mower stores etc, and these will require referencing to GIA, with full details to assist the valuation, and also a note of the footprint of the building.

G. Referencing and Valuation requirements for external Works

  1. Full referencing details of the externals are not required, however a note of the nature of the site will be required. In addition a note of the total number of parking spaces will be needed.

H. Areas that do not require referencing in detail

35. There are many areas in a centre that do not require detailed referencing as they can in aggregate be found by deduction of other areas from overall GIA, and are normally valued by means of inclusion in a “circulation addition”. These include:

**J. Other Matters** **36. Micro-generation/Renewable Energy provision** Details should be obtained of the presence within the hereditament of equipment such as wind turbines, solar panels, bio-mass boilers etc. Reference should be made to RM section 3 for further advice on referencing detail required. **Rating manual - Section 960: Local Authority Sports Centres, Tennis Centres, Swimming Pools and Leisure Centres** **Appendix 2 Aide Memoir for Inspection**
Manager’s offices and Administration areas In circulation addition
Staff Changing In circulation addition
Toilets for visitors (non players)/staff In circulation addition
Circulation space Circulation addition
Main Pool Count the lane lines, these usually appear in the MIDDLE of each lane, but occasionally define the lane edges. Note maximum depth. Also note whether 50m, 25m (modern standards), or 33m or 20m pool. Measure length & width as some pools are non-standard.
Learner Pool Count the lane lines if possible and note the hall in which it is. Also measure the pool area. This helps us choose the right type.
Ancillary Or Abnormal Pool Measure Water area. Note maximum depth.  
Leisure Pool Water Measure water area.  
Leisure Pool Surround Measure dry area.  
Pool Viewing Count seats. Ask about usage and gala events.
Sauna/Solaria Measure just the room in which the main facilities are and mark on the plan. Do not measure the WCs, showers, changing etc. If small, perhaps without changing etc., measure whole area.
Flume Note length and whether covered flume or open slide. Note whether used with leisure pool or standard pool.
Main Hall Note the number of badminton courts. Note if larger than normal and why.
Ancillary/Abnormal Hall Either count the number of badminton courts or measure.  
Bowls Hall Count the rinks.  
Tennis Hall Note the number of tennis courts. Note if larger than normal and why.
Fitness Suites/Gyms Count the stations in the gym and note this on the plan. Stations are each individual activity and include warm up mats.
Squash Courts Count the courts and note on the plan. Note if courts are disused.
Multi Use Physical eg. aerobics hall, note activity and measure. (This needs changing facilities.)
Activity Non Physical eg. meeting room note activity and measure. (This does not need changing facilities.)
Dry Viewing Count the seats.  
Shop Measure.  
Crèche Note place, and measure. If crèche is part of the bar do not double count.
Snooker/Pool Measure.  
Function Room Measure. Include any dedicated kitchen etc.
Sport Treatment Room Measure and note on plan.  
Open Air Pool Buildings Measure.  
Café Count covers.  
All Weather Pitches Count number and measure area.  
Tennis Courts Hard Count number.  
Lighting Columns Count number and type.  
Open Air Pool Measure water area and hard surround.  
Grass Football Hockey Pitches Count number of pitches, and measure pitch areas. This aids dealing with external changing requirement.
Any Outside Bowling Greens Measure area, note if crown or flat.  
Note the location:- city/town centre, suburban, rural, and whether it is an island site, landscaped or with car park. P174_4717" Notional Areas for Main Facilities to compare with actual on site                            
       
Sports Halls based on Badminton Courts
  Court Facility Hall Size Store area
  1 court hall 171 21.37
  2 court hall 306 38.25
  3 court hall 486 60.75
  4 court hall 690 86.25
  5 court hall 866.81 108.35
  6 court hall 931.5 116.43
  7 court hall 1039.7 129.96
  8 court hall 1380 172.5
  9 court hall 1397.25 174.26
  10 court hall 1733.62 216.7
  12 court hall 2070 258.75
  15 court hall 2600.43 325.05
   
 
Tennis Halls Based on Number of Courts
  1 Court Hall 668.9 5.2
  2 Court hall 1226.2 10.4   3 Court hall 1783.5 15.6   4 Court hall 2340.8 20.8   5 Court hall 2898.2 26   6 Court hall 3455.5 31.2   7 Court hall 4012.8 36.4   8 Court hall 4570.2 41.6   9 Court hall 5127.5 46.8   10 Court hall 5684.8 52        
Swimming Pools Main based on 25m standard
Number of Lanes Main Pool 25m Water area Surround area
        4 25 x 9 swim pool 225.0 165.0 5 25 x 11 swim pool 275.0 175.0 6 25 x 13 swim pool 325.0 185.0 7 25 x 15 swim pool 375.0 195.0 8 25 x 17 swim pool 425.0 205.0             Swimming Pools Main based on 50m standard(competition) Number of Lanes Main Pool 50m Water area Surround area                 10(8 competitor) 50 x 25 swim pool 1250m2 796 Rating manual - Section 960: Local Authority Sports Centres, Tennis Centres, Swimming Pools and Leisure Centres **Appendix 3 : Additional Notes for Caseworkers** This appendix is intended to give further information on the concepts behind the design of the substitute building, and on the valuation of the hereditament by reference to the cost of the substitute building. Reference is made only to those items where it is necessary to give additional information to that contained within the practice notes and referencing guides (Appendices 1 and 2). **1. Design of the Substitute Building** **1.1**. The Basic Concept of the Substitute The basic design of a modern leisure centre is of a building with wet and/or dry hall(s), and/or tennis hall of single storey construction housing the main sports facilities. The hall or halls are linked to a two storey block which contains all other facilities, the changing rooms, bar, café, reception, offices etc. **1.2**. All pools are contained in a single ‘wet’ hall. **1.3**. The main dry facilities are contained in a separate hall, and there may be separate halls for indoor bowls, and in some cases there is also a hall for tennis. **2. Main Pools** **2.1** All modern swimming pools are constructed to one of two lengths, 25m or 50m (Olympic Length). Currently there is only a small number of 50m pools in the United Kingdom, though several new ones have been constructed in recent years. The width of the pool varies between 4 and 10 lanes dependent upon the level of use envisaged. For example, many pools are 6 lanes in width, but smaller country towns may have a 4 lane pool, whereas important pools in larger towns and cities may be 8 or even 10 lanes wide. **2.2** It follows that the substitute pool should normally be one of these two lengths. However there are many older pools that are not built to one of the standard lengths; in particular many swimming pools constructed in the 1960s and early 1970s are 33m in length. This was then considered a standard length. Such pools should always be valued by reference to a replacement pool of 25m, but when valuing a “busy” pool, consideration should be given to envisaging a wider substitute to offset the reduction in water area. **2.3** Example 1. A 1960s pool of 33m by 6 lanes (13m width). The normal replacement would be a 25m 6 lane pool. **2.4** Example 2. As above, but the pool is particularly well used. The replacement modern pool would be 25m by 8 lanes (17m width). 2.5 Example 3. The existing pool is 20m by 10m. As the existing length is less than the smallest modern standard, it would be appropriate to use a substitute pool of the same size as the existing pool. **2.6** It is essential that if smaller pools are built to “short competition standard ” they are correctly identified and recorded as main pools. If not to competition standard then they should be recorded as secondary pools **3. Teaching Pools** **3.1** The modern concept of pool design includes a teaching pool at the foot of the main pool within the same hall. The length of the teaching pool is usually the same as the width of the main pool (or 13m whichever is the greater), and 7.5m in width. If the existing pool is larger, then the size of the existing pool should be adopted provided there is sufficient demand to justify it. **3.2** Example 1. Substitute main pool is 25m by 13m (6 lanes) - the teaching pool would normally be 13m by 7.5. **3.3** Example 2. Substitute main pool is 50m by 21m (10 lanes) – the teaching pool would normally be 21m by 7.5m. **3.4** Example 3. An older 33m pool has a teaching pool which is 20m by 10m – retain the size of the existing teaching pool, provided the demand is sufficient. **4. Secondary pools** Some pools have a second main pool. The considerations here are similar to the main pool in section 2 above. (SEE also **5. Diving pools** **5.1** Many older pools have a diving pit (usually 3.8m deep) as part of the main pool either in the length of the main pool or directly to one side, so the water forms an ‘L’ shape. Neither of these arrangements would be allowed in a modern pool because of health and safety considerations, and a substitute diving pool would be built as a separate pool within the wet hall. Diving pools may attract other users which need deeper water, such as sub-aqua clubs, lifesaving clubs, and water polo clubs. **5.2** Diving pools are less likely to be constructed in a modern centre, partly because of health and safety concerns. Nonetheless some high quality diving pools have been constructed in recent years. Pools used solely for diving create little need for changing facilities compared with other types of pool, however some of the best modern diving facilities have diving pools with movable floors (from 6m to 0m depth) and can be used for a variety of other uses, eg. water polo or water aerobics and in such cases consideration should be given to treating the pool as an abnormal pool which gives rise to a greater changing room space. This is only likely to apply in top quality modern diving pools . **6. Leisure Pools** These may be found as a pure leisure pool, or along with conventional swimming pools. There has been some decline in the popularity of leisure pools in recent years. In modern designs the leisure pool is likely to be constructed alongside the swimming pool within the main hall. **7. Squash Courts** The popularity of squash declined during the 1990’s and early part of the 21st century and as a consequence, many courts have been converted to other uses. **8. Fitness Gyms** Fitness gyms on the other hand have become increasingly popular, and as they are financially attractive centre managers have sought to increase provision of gyms and gym equipment, indeed many squash courts have been converted to gyms. In many cases gym equipment is allocated less than the ideal amount of space, and the substitute hereditament envisages often that the gym will be greater in size than the existing facility. **9. Tennis Centres** Tennis centres are dealt with largely in the same way as dry Halls and are similarly based upon the number of courts. Unlike the hall in dry centres tennis halls are usually single use halls. Most Tennis halls are built to lower specification than dry halls, and have lower degrees of heating (in some cases heating has been removed from tennis halls as not being required), andconsequently the adopted costs are lower. For this reason it is unlikely that a Tennis hall will qualify for a reduction for lower quality. **10. The Pre -Valuation Process** **10.1** Prior to commencing the valuation process the following key information is required: * The date when the centre was opened to the public. * The gross internal area as at the material day. **10.2** The actual gross internal area (GIA) is to be used on all centres opened after 1/4/2015, International standard 50m pools and any Centre where the area of the substitute hereditament as calculated by reference to Table 1 is greater than the existing. However the actual area may still be adjusted to exclude space which is redundant at the antecedent valuation date and which is likely to remain so. **10.3** The calculator sheet which forms part of the valuation spreadsheet held on the Non-Bulk server for this class will calculate the area of the substitute building from the areas and information that is input but the following is guidance as to the manual process required to replicate that process. Goldsmiths (Crowborough, East Sussex) [Goldsmiths (Crowborough, East Sussex)](https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5900857aed915d06b00001e4/App3_img1.gif) Sovereign Centre: the Competition Pool (Eastbourne, East Sussex) [Sovereign Centre: the Competition Pool (Eastbourne, East Sussex)](https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5900858640f0b606e300020f/App3_img2.gif) Sovereign Centre : the Leisure Pool (Eastbourne, East Sussex) [Sovereign Centre : the Leisure Pool (Eastbourne, East Sussex)](https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/59008599e5274a06b3000237/App3_img3.gif) Sovereign Centre: the Dry Sports Hall - Photographs of two further centres are included below, that of the Littledown Centre in Bournemouth, as an example of a centre where a 5% increase for quality is appropriate, and of Southglades, Nottingham, where a 5% decrease is appropriate. [Sovereign Centre: the Dry Sports Hall](https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/590085d0e5274a06b3000239/App3_img4.gif) Littledown Centre (Bournemouth) [Littledown Centre (Bournemouth) ](https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/590085e040f0b606e3000211/App3_img5.gif) Littledown Centre (Bournemouth) [Littledown Centre (Bournemouth)](https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5900860740f0b606e3000213/App3_img6.gif) Southglades (Nottingham) [Southglades (Nottingham)](https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/59008613e5274a06b0000206/App3_img7.gif) Southglades (Nottingham) [Southglades (Nottingham)](https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/59008645e5274a06b300023b/App3_img8.gif) **10.4** In those instances where the actual GIA is adopted in preference to the area of the calculated area of the substitute building then the actual GIA shall be apportioned between wet and dry areas in the proportions as arrived at by reference to the substitute building (as per Table 1). **10.5** If not currently recorded the following matters should be established with Centre Management * If a sports hall is present, ascertain what is the primary sport for which it is laid out. In most instances it will be badminton. When the hall is regularly used for non-sporting activities, ascertain whether any change in hall size would compromise these activities. If so, the area adopted will be that required in order to accommodate these activities. The area is grossed up to include space for storage and changing in accordance with the comments under “abnormal halls” in Table 1. A separate part of Table 1 provides guidance for tennis halls, based upon the number of tennis courts present at the centre under consideration. * Where present, the area of ancillary dry sports halls should be grossed up as for “abnormal halls” in accordance with Table 1 as above. * When considering the classification of a room/hall for the purpose of calculating thesubstitute area (from Table 1) establish whether or not its use requires changing facilities. The gym or dance studio will need to provide changing facilities, whereas a crèche/meeting room for hire would not. * When applying the area guidance in Table 1, note the existing use and consider whether the area given over to the facility is appropriate for the needs at the antecedent valuation date (AVD). An old traditional sauna would for example be replaced in the simple substitute with a smaller area serviced with modern equipment. * When selecting the size of a swimming pool for the purpose of calculating the notional substitute all pools should be taken to be either 25 or 50m long (unless existing are shorter than 25m).The number of existing lanes selects the width (the standard adopted is 2m per lane plus 1m). In most instances the existing number of lanes will be replicated. Very popular 6 lanes x 33m pools could be replaced with 8 lane x 25m pools. Actual pool usage should inform whether to value a 6x25 or an 8x25 pool. Training pool length is normally selected by the width of main pool x the standard width of 7.5m. In the event of a narrower main pool of 13m then a 13m training pool should be provided. If in doubt replace the pool with a similar total water area. * Smaller pools built to “short competition standard”must be correctly identified and recorded as main pools. If not to competition standard then they should be recorded as secondary pools * Calculate and apply the areas of purpose built leisure pools based upon the actual water area and surround. * The viewing area should be calculated by reference to Table 1 having regard to the actual maximum seat usage at AVD. In most instances dry viewing will be from the first floor bar lounge area. * Space used for ancillary activities should be included based upon the use at the AVD but having regard to subsequent material changes in circumstances. No account needs to be recorded of the following, as nominal areas for these are incorporated within the “grossed up areas in Table 1 to accord with the design guidelines issued by Sport England/ASA Circulation. Storage. Changing wet, dry and group. Plant. Reception. Public Toilets. First Aid. Administration. Staff changing and rest rooms. **10.6**. When calculating the size of the simple substitute the diving pool area may be subject to a utilisation adjustment dependent upon the proximity of similar facilities in the locality in accordance with the following.:- Establish where the nearest diving pool is. If the nearest centre is within 60 minutes’ drive time then the Table 1 area may be reduced by 25%. If the nearest centre is within 30 minutes’ drive time then the total area may be reduced by 50%. A further reduction could apply in circumstances where the diving pool has been subject to a later addition of a leisure pool. **10.7** When calculating the size of the simple substitute the fitness gym may be subject to a utilisation factor where a privately operated fitness gym lies within the catchment area or otherwise comes into competition with the subject hereditament. Before an adjustment is made it is to be demonstrated that there is a significant and ongoing effect on the admission figures for the subject hereditament that are not attributable to any other factors and that further the current usage could be accommodated within a smaller gym than that currently provided. This would normally be manifest in the removal over time of underutilised equipment. **10.8** The concept of the simple substitute accords with the layout example contained in the Sport England guidance “Affordable Sports Centres” and “Swimming Pools” published in 2013 **10.9** The costs to be applied reflect the difference in construction costs between wet, tennis and dry facilities. **10.10** The café and bar areas are allocated between wet, tennis and dry proportional to the calculation of the wet, tennis and dry split. **10.11** The addition of 9% on to the calculated wet and dry area relates to the areas that are separately calculated, namely staff rooms, admin, reception, public toilets, and circulation space around the facilities. **Table1** **The Substitute Hereditament** **Note** –The calculated areas in respect of halls are for illustrative purposes. It will be necessary to utilise the formula to calculate the area required for other hall sizes.
Element Area in m2 Comments
    Hall selected on the basis of number of badminton courts in current use, exceptions being small halls where they would be replaced at their current size, or halls used primarily for other sports or non sports activities requiring a larger hall to a different standard.
2 Court hall 405.1 The area is calculated by taking the  area of the Court with surround etc of 306m2 which is then aggregated with storage area of 12.5% of the court area (38.25m2) dry changing of (16 x 1.91m2)=30.56m2 and plant area of 9% of the area of the hall and changing area =30.29m2
5 Court Hall 1136.45   With a 5 court hall this will be 866.81m2 , a storage area of 108.35m2, a dry change area of 76.4m2and a plant area of 84.89m2
12 Court Hall 2714.91   With a 12 court hall this will be 2070m2, a storage area of 258.75m2, a dry change area of 183.36m2 and a plant area of 202.80m2 Other sized halls follow the same formula.
1 Lane Bowls Hall 209.1 The areas are calculated by taking dimensions of 36.59m and 4.57m(plus 0.6m for surround ) per lane and aggregating that with a storage area of 10m2 per lane and a plant area of 5% of the area of the hall and store.  In addition an extra allowance should be made for dry changing if necessary at 3.11m2/space.
5 Lane Bowls Hall 953.4   With a 5 lane hall  this will be   36.59x (4.57x5+0.6)=858.03m2+ storage of 50m2 and a plant area of 45.4m2
12 Lane Bowls Hall 2256.0   With a 12 lane hall this will be 36.59x (4.57x12=0.6)=2028.5m2+storage of 120m2 and plant area of107.4m2. Other sized halls follow the same formula.
1 Court Tennis Hall 692.3 The areas are calculated by taking the notional area of the Hall for the number of stated courts and aggregating that with a storage area based on 5.2m2 per court, a dry changing area of( 8 x 1.92m2) 15.36m2 per court and a plant area of 2.925m2  per court
4 Court Tennis Hall 2434.4  With a 4 court hall this will be 2340.8m2 + 20.8m2 storage + dry changing of  (32x1.92m2) 61.44m2+plant area of 11.7m2
10 Court Tennis Hall 5919.6   And with a 10 court hall this will be 5684.8m2+ 52m2 storage +dry changing of (80x1.92m2)153.6m2 +plant area of 29.25m2.Other sized halls follow the same formula.
Abnormal Hall   Take hall area + 12½% for storage + 3.11m2 per changing space. Number of spaces to reflect the primary use of hall.
Dry viewing when not bar lounge   0.6m2 per space.
Fitness gym   Quantity of stations x 4.5m2+ 1.57m2 changing
Multi use room   Area in use + 1.57 m2 per changing space necessary for primary use (ideally 1 per 5m2).
Squash court   73m2 per Court.
External change   2.35m2 per Space.
25 x 9 Swimming pool 722.05 Standard pool for most circumstances is 25 x 13, smaller pools chosen to match existing, larger pools where existing demand requires.The substitute area takes the area of the pool and surround and adds to that an area for changing of water area x 3.11/5.5+50m2 group change, a storage area of 36m2   and a first aid room of 10m2. A further addition of 22.5% of the water  area and 15% of the remaining area is added as plant area
25 x 17 Swimming pool 1143.14   In this case the water area is 425m2, the surround 205m2, changing area of 290.32m2, a storage area of 36m2, first aid room of 10m2 and plant room of 176.82. 25m pools of other widths will follow the same formula.
50 x 25 Swimming pool(competition) 3449.2   For 50m pools the calculation is as follows water area 1250m2, surround 796m2 changing area of 806.8m2 (1250x 3.11/5,5+100m2 group change)+first aid room of 15m2 a store of 50m2 and a plant area of 531.42m2.
13 x 7½ Swimming pool 270.8 Learner pool selected on the basis of the width of the main pool, unless it is less than 13m then 13m should be used.
Abnormal swimming pool   Take water area x 1.945 and surround area x 1.15 +110.4m2 for first aid, store and group change.
Leisure pool   Measure existing water area x 1.83 and surround area x 1.15 add 10 -15m2 for pools without other main swimming pools.
Diving pool 320.6 Area required for a 3m high board and 2 springboards.
    When calculating the area of pool surrounds length side surrounds of 2m are assumed for 25m community pools and combined width side surround of 5m. For 20m pools the figures are 1.5m and 4 m respectively and for 50m pools 4m and 12m. For teaching pools the figures are 1.5m and 3m. For diving 2m and 8m and for international diving pools 6m and 12m
Pool side viewing   0.69m2 per space.
Sauna/sun beds etc   Based on existing use but adjusted for area replaced with modern equipment.
Café with food prep/ warm up   As existing but adjusted for superfluity, as a guide 75m2 + 1.9m2 per cover (seat).
Vending area if no Café   As existing but adjusted for superfluity, as a guide 1m2 per machine together with 1.9m2 per cover (seat) if space provided outside of main circulation for seating.
Bar lounge/dry viewing   Based on existing but adjusted for area in use.
Retail shop   Based on existing but adjusted for utilisation.
Other   Area and rate subject to existing use.
Public toilets, reception, administration, staff areas and circulation   9% of total area calculated above.
##Practice note 1: 2017: Local authority sports centres, tennis centres, swimming pools & leisure centres This practice note must be read in conjunction with the section of the Rating Manual relating to this class which deals in more detail with referencing requirements and the approach to valuation. This practice note does not apply to centres entirely built as an ice rink or a bowls hall. For the avoidance of doubt private sports and leisure facilities are a separate class see Rating Manual Section 6 - Part 3 - Section 965. ###1. Market Appraisal 5 factors have influenced the sector in the years 2008 to 2015. These being (i) Olympics, pre event, event, and post event (ii) Sport England Guidelines (iii) Occupation of local authority properties by “other bodies” (iv) Continuing building in time of recession (v) Competition from the private sector. i)The award of the 2012 Olympic Games to London heralded the construction of various significant facilities, which were used for the 2012 event, and then converted/ adapted/ transferred post event, not only in London itself but throughout the UK either for the purposes of staging events or more generally for training and preparation. ii) The size and design of sports centres has been influenced for many years by guidelines published by Sport England and other sport specific bodies such as the Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) and The Lawn Tennis Association. In the period 2010 to 2014 Sport England issued replacement guidelines for both “dry” and “wet facilities” which although similar in many regard to the existing contained some changes which impacts upon the recommended design size. iii) There has been a continuing trend toward local authorities passing on the occupation of their sports centres to charitable trusts to take advantage of the fiscal and other financial benefits which this bestows. In other instances independent companies have been brought in to manage the facility on behalf of the council who benefit from the expertise of the operator whilst retaining overall control of the operation of the facility. Toward the end of the period some “not for profit organisations” which have no relationship with the previous local authority occupier have taken leases of the sports and leisure facilities, albeit it is thought these arrangements are unlikely to be on a “vacant and to let” basis. iv) Notwithstanding the restrictions on local authority budgets new sports centres and swimming pools have continued to be built during the period possibly due to the impetus of the Olympic legacy and grant funding. v) There is no doubt that in recent years local authority leisure centres have considerably increased and improved their gym/fitness centre facilities, on the basis that those facilities can, and do, provide a far better income stream to cost ratio than wet side, thus helping to subsidize the latter. The Sport England document “Swimming Pools Updated Guidance for 2013. © Sport England 2014. May Revision 004” states “In recent years, England has seen a growth of commercial pools to the point that, in numerical terms, they are now almost equal to the numbers of Local Authority pools. However, the commercial pools tend to be small in size and have shallower water, being aimed primarily at the fitness/aerobic/recreation market. They tend to offer a reduced programme of activities and have restrictive pricing. They are less likely to allow for competition swimming or teaching. The trend for the education sector is to be a diminishing provider of swimming facilities.” Consequently although the number of private facilities has increased and as a consequence competition with LA Leisure centres and swimming pools has certainly not diminished they are not competing directly to provide exactly the same services to exactly the same customer base through identical hereditaments. ####2.2. Changes from the 2010 Practice Note The method of valuation remains as before i.e. the contractors basis. The calculation of the nature and size of the modern substitute has been modified to accord with the updated guidance contained within Sport England guidance notes “Affordable Sports Centres”(2013), “Sports Halls Design and Layout “(2012), Swimming Pools (2013) and Affordable Sports Centres with Community 50m Pool Options”. The gross internal area( GIA) obtained from the application of the substitute building approach is now adopted in respect of all pools opened prior to the 1st April 2015 (previously 2000)with the exception of 50m pools built to International competitive standards in which case the actual GIA should be adopted. This is because the substitute hereditament for a 50m pool assumes national standards. ####3.3.Ratepayer Discussions No discussions have taken place with local authority representatives nor their appointed agents. ####4.4. Method of Valuation **4.1** It is not considered that there is any reliable open market rental evidence relating to this class. In centres operated by or for local authorities the primary purpose of occupation is not to make a profit but to provide an amenity for residents in the area for social and economic reasons .A small number of sports and leisure centres, although owned by local authorities are let to and operated by independent “not for profit “ charitable organisations. It is unlikely that the level of rents payable under such arrangements are a reliable indicator of the rent that would be negotiated between the hypothetical tenant and landlord in an open market scenario as envisaged under the rating hypothesis. Consequently the contractors basis should be applied in valuing this class of hereditament. Further guidance on the application of the contractors basis is given in section 4.2 below. ####4.2 Contractors Basis of Valuation The costs shown in this section are for ease of reference. In all cases where a cost guide code is shown that must be input into the NBS template, not the costs shown here. Where the cost guide code shows options, the costs shown in this practice note should be used to aid selection. Should the cost guide show differing costs to those shown in a current version of this practice note, please refer to the CCT.” **a) Stage 1 Estimated Replacement Cost** **i) Build Costs** The Estimated Replacement Cost (Stage 1) of the building(s) should be ascertained by applying the appropriate substitute building cost obtained from a consideration of Appendix 1 and the 2017 VOA Cost Guide (the Cost Guide) to the gross internal area(GIA) or substitute GIA as appropriate. The costs relate to wet and dry areas as defined in the Rating Manual main section. The total GIA of the wet and dry areas is ascertained by populating the calculator sheet embedded within the dedicated NBS spreadsheet, an exercise which should always be undertaken. Where a centre or swimming pool is of exceptionally high quality or unusually poor in design and construction in comparison with the bulk of centres of a similar age then an addition or deduction of up to 5% may be made to the cost adopted to reflect this. However it is anticipated that this will be the rare exception. When considering whether an allowance is appropriate under this heading comparison is to be made to other centres of a similar age which have not been subject to refurbishment schemes. **ii) External Works** An addition for external works will be made in accordance with the guidance in Appendix 2. **iii) Contract Size Adjustment** To be applied in accordance with the Cost Guide **iv) Location factors** To be applied in accordance with the Cost Guide (or Rating Manual Section 4 - Part 3) **v) Fees** General guidance on the amount to be added for fees is provided in the Cost Guide. **b) Stage 2 Age and Obsolescence (A&O) Allowances** The age and obsolescence allowances given in Appendix 3 vary as to whether the accommodation is wet or dry and with the age of the facility. The allowances depart from those generally applied to other classes of hereditament assessed by reference to the contractors basis and reflect the particular nature of sports and leisure centres and the accelerated ageing of the buildings. Where a centre has been substantially refurbished, it will be necessary to consider the appropriate age to adopt for the purposes of any age and obsolescence allowance to be applied at Stage 2 of the valuation. This will be a matter of judgement, but it is unlikely that major parts of the structure will have been renewed. As such the appropriate date will always be after the date of construction but someway prior to the date of refurbishment, as this would reflect the age and obsolescence of a whole centre being built as at that later date. The use of an equated age to reflect refurbishment should be recorded in the over write column and the age of the building as stated in column D of the spreadsheet must always reflect the actual date of construction. No age allowance should be applied to site value, except in London where a site value in excess of amenity value has been adopted. In exceptional circumstances, the A&O allowance appropriate to the wet area may be increased by an additional 5% .This will only apply to those sports centres built prior to 1980 and which have not been subject to a scheme of modernisation or improvement. Under no circumstances should this allowances be applied without prior inspection. **c) Stage 3 Land Value** Ascertain the actual site area and apply the values in accordance with Appendix 4 **d) Stage 4 De-capitalisation** Apply the higher de-capitalisation rate **e) Stage 5 End Allowances** i) Excess Running Costs of the centre based upon the difference in the actual area of the centre and the area of the simple substitute building. Apply % reduction as per Appendix 5 . For the avoidance of doubt the GIA of any buildings at the hereditament which are not included in the area calculation of the substitute building should not be included in the calculation of this end allowance. For example a leisure centre with wet and dry facilities has an area of 3500m2, plus there is an athletics track with a grandstand of 400m2 and a grounds man’s store of 50m2. The calculation shows the GIA of the leisure centre alone could be replaced by a centre of 3000 m2. The allowance for excess size should be based on the area of 3000m2 compared with the actual area of 3500m2. It should not be based on 3000m2 compared with (3500+400+50)=3950m2 ii) Where a sports centre has oil, LPG fired heating or electrical heating, an end allowance of 5% shall be applied to the valuation iii) Where the construction or design of the roof structure is not typical for the age or type of building and thereby creates an exceptional year on year repair liability over and above what could reasonably be expected, consideration should be given to making an allowance at stage 5 iv) Other Stage 5 Adjustments: Judgement should be exercised as to whether it is appropriate to give allowances at stage 5. These should not replicate allowances given previously in the valuation process particularly at stage 2. Typically allowances may reflect excessive site fragmentation or restrictive internal arrangements which prevent the use of halls for the full variety of sports normally associated with a hall of that size etc. **Rating Manual - Section 6 - Part 3 - : Section 960: Local Authority Sports Centres, Tennis Centres, Swimming Pools and Leisure Centres** **Appendix 1 Building Costs**
Description Cost Guide Reference Cost (£per square metre)
Dry Side Accommodation STF020 £1470 Wet Side Accommodation (25m pool) STD020 £2089 Wet Side Accommodation (50m pool) STE020 £2432 Additional cost for Leisure Pool fit out STG020 £1318 External Pools (Excluding changing) 63Z00T £ 1275 Flume to Pool STC020 £ 2182 per metre run Floating Floor (main pool) STG035 £250,000 per item Tennis Halls STB020 £ 674 Tennis Courts Type 1(Macadam –SEPCA Standard) 53U30F £41,300 for 1 court 53U30F £67,917 for 2 courts For multiple courts and for Tennis Courts Type 3 (see Cost guide) Tennis Court Cover Single Skin including foundation 53U15F £77,915 Double Skin including foundation 53U16A £116,777 **Sports Surfaces** Astroturf STK020 £65 3G STM020 £88 Water Based STL020 £106 **Lighting (per pitch)** Football (180 Lux) STH020 £59,000 Rugby (100 Lux) Training ST1020 £59,000 Hockey (350 Lux) STJ020 £63,000 Where lighting is provided to other facilities, including 5 a side pitches, the lighting columns and lamps should be individually cost by reference to the cost guide **Car parking** (Where additional to external works i.e. where serving other hereditaments) Additional Car parking (per space) STA020 £1938 **Rating Manual - Section 6 - Part 3 - : Section 960: Local Authority Sports Centres, Tennis Centres, Swimming Pools and Leisure Centres** **Appendix 2 External Works**
Description Wet only Dry only Wet and Dry
Town centre or island site typically with 90% or greater building ratio, no more than a small yard or garden area, and either no car parking, or a very limited number of spaces within the hereditament. 1.5% 2.0% 1.75%
As above, but typically with an 80% to 90% building ratio, limited parking, external lighting and landscaping and some boundary fencing. 2.0% 2.5% 2.25%
Site typically with 50%/75% building ratio, some landscaping around buildings, secure boundary fencing, adequate parking, external lighting and landscaping with limited general parking within the hereditament and boundary fencing. 3.5% 5.0% 4.25%
As above, but typically with 25%/50% building ratio, landscaping around buildings, secure boundary fencing, external lighting, adequate parking within the hereditament which falls short of full requirements. 5.0 % 7.5% 6.25%
Site typically with about 25% building ratio, landscaping around buildings, secure boundary fencing, external lighting and adequate parking within the hereditament for all staff and other users. 10.0% 12.5% 11.25%
It is emphasised that the table above is for guidance and the external works at a centre are to be individually considered as necessary. **Rating Manual - Section 6 - Part 3 - : Section 960: Local Authority Sports Centres, Tennis Centres, Swimming Pools and Leisure Centres** **Appendix 3 Age and Obsolescence Allowances**
Date of Construction Basic Age & Obsolescence Dry Side Differential Dry Side Allowance Basic Age & Obsolescence Wet Side Differential Wet Side Allowance
2017 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
2016 0.5% 0.0% 0.5% 0.5% 0.0% 0.5%
2015 1.0% 0.0% 1.0% 1.0% 0.0% 1.0%
2014 1.5% 0.0% 1.5% 1.5% 0.0% 1.5%
2013 2.0% 0.0% 2.0% 2.0% 0.0% 2.0%
2012 2.5% 0.0% 2.5% 2.5% 0.0% 2.5%
2011 3.0% 0.0% 3.0% 3.0% 0.0% 3.0%
2010 3.5% 0.0% 3.5% 3.5% 0.0% 3.5%
2009 4.0% 0.0% 4.0% 4.0% 0.0% 4.0%
2008 4.5% 0.0% 4.5% 4.5% 0.0% 4.5%
2007 5.0% 0.0% 5.0% 5.0% 0.0% 5.0%
2006 6.0% 0.0% 6.0% 6.0% 0.0% 6.0%
2005 7.0% 0.0% 7.0% 7.0% 0.0% 7.0%
2004 8.0% 0.0% 8.0% 8.0% 0.0% 8.0%
2003 9.0% 0.0% 9.0% 9.0% 0.0% 9.0%
2002 10.0% 0.0% 10.0% 10.0% 0.0% 10.0%
2001 11.0% 1.0% 12.0% 11.0% 1.0% 12.0%
2000 12.0% 2.0% 14.0% 12.0% 2.0% 14.0%
1999 13.0% 3.0% 16.0% 13.0% 3.0% 16.0%
1998 14.0% 4.0% 18.0% 14.0% 4.0% 18.0%
1997 15.0% 5.0% 20.0% 15.0% 5.0% 20.0%
1996 16.0% 6.0% 22.0% 16.0% 6.0% 22.0%
1995 17.0% 7.0% 24.0% 17.0% 7.0% 24.0%
1994 18.0% 8.0% 26.0% 18.0% 8.0% 26.0%
1993 19.0% 9.0% 28.0% 19.0% 9.0% 28.0%
1992 20.0% 10.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 30.0%
1991 21.0% 11.0% 32.0% 21.0% 11.5% 32.5%
1990 22.0% 12.0% 34.0% 22.0% 13.0% 35.0%
1989 23.0% 13.0% 36.0% 23.0% 14.5% 37.5%
1988 24.0% 14.0% 38.0% 24.0% 16% 40.0%
1987 25.0% 15.0% 40.0% 25.0% 17.5% 42.5%
1986 26.0% 16.0% 42.0% 26.0% 19.0% 45.0%
1985 27.0% 17.0% 44.0% 27.0% 20.5% 47.5%
1984 28.0% 18.0% 46.0% 28.0% 22.0% 50.0%
1983 29.0% 19.0% 48.0% 29.0% 23.5% 52.5%
1982 30.0% 20.0% 50.0% 30.0% 25.0% 55.0%
1981 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 31.0% 25.5% 56.5%
1980 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 32.0% 26.0% 58.0%
1979 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 33.0% 26.5% 59.5%
1978 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 34.0% 27.0% 61.0%
1977 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 35.0% 27.5% 62.5%
1976 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 36.0% 28.0% 64.0%
1975 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 37.0% 28.5% 65.5%
1974 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 38.0% 29.0% 67.0%
1973 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 39.0% 29.5% 68.5%
1972 & before Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 40.0% 30.0% 70%
**Rating Manual - Section 6 - Part 3 - : Section 960: Local Authority Sports Centres, Tennis Centres, Swimming Pools and Leisure Centres** **Appendix 4 Land Values** **Description £ per Hectare**
All of England and Wales except Central London(North and South) Apply Amenity Value to the site area in accordance with the 2017 Land Value Practice Note
Central London (North and South) (To be read in conjunction with the note below) Apply Industrial Value (less 20%) to the site area in accordance with the 2017 Land Value Practice Note
Note Where a sports and leisure centre or swimming pool located within Central London(N &S) has been built on land previously used as public open space the amenity value applicable to Greater London NW is to be applied in place of Industrial value (less 20%). Likewise, if a leisure centre within Central London could ,without detriment to the local community which it serves, be located in a part of Greater London then the land value applicable to that part of Greater London should be adopted
**Rating Manual - Section 6 - Part 3 - : Section 960: Local Authority Sports Centres, Tennis Centres, Swimming Pools and Leisure Centres** **Appendix 5 Excess Running Costs Allowance** Reduction factor = (E-S)/E% Where E = Actual building area and S = Substitute building area
Reduction factor Adjust valuation by
1% 0.25%
2% 0.50%
3% 0.75%
4% 1.00%
5% 1.25%
6% 1.50%
7% 1.75%
8% 2.00%
9% 2.25%
10% 2.50%
11% 2.75%
12% 3.00%
13% 3.25%
14% 3.50%
15% 3.75%
16% 4.00%
17% 4.25%
18% 4.50%
19% 4.75%
20% 5.00%
21% 5.25%
22% 5.50%
23% 5.75%
24% 6.00%
25% 6.25%
26% 6.50%
27% 6.75%
28% 7.00%
29% 7.25%
30% 7.50%
##Appendix 1: Referencing guide: Local authority sports centres, tennis centres, swimming pools & leisure centres This class of hereditament is valued by reference to GIA, but since the costs of different parts vary considerably, and space standards have changed over time, it is necessary to identify the areas of different functional parts of each hereditament. Over a number of Rating Lists, agreement has been reached on a standardised approach which identifies required areas rather than actual areas. This approach does not apply to newer hereditaments, hereditaments which comprise (wholly or primarily) ice rinks and/or bowling centres, and hereditaments where the cost of construction was grant-aided and where a reduction is claimed on that basis. Since this standardised approach cannot be applied to all hereditaments and is not necessarily available for the future, without revision, full referencing of all hereditaments in this class is required. An aide-memoire is to be found in Appendix 2 to this Section. **Referencing requirements** In all cases the overall GIA of the individual buildings in the hereditament (including individually all out buildings) will always be required as of necessity. **A. Referencing and Valuation requirements for wet areas** ###1. The main swimming pool. (For leisure pools see below) the referencing requirement for pools is the length of the main pool, together with the width (whether an actual measurement, or the number of marked lanes), and the maximum depth. Notes on Pool sizes: Modern pools are usually one of two standard lengths 25m, or 50m (or Olympic Length - there is only a small number of Olympic pools in Great Britain at present). When considering the size of a replacement pool the length of the pool will be one of these two measurements except where the existing pool is shorter than 25m where the existing length should be retained. Pools range in width from 4 lanes (9m width) (usually in smaller rural locations) upwards. There is a ten-lane pool under construction in Leicester currently (May 2002). ###2. The Teaching Pool. Most centres with a main pool will also have a teaching pool that is smaller and shallower used for lessons and less confident swimmers. The referencing requirement here is the length and width of the existing pool. Note on Teaching Pools: The modern trend is for the teaching pool to occupy a space at the foot of the main pool within the same hall, and for the teaching pool to be either 13m long, or equal to the width of the main pool (if the width of the main pool is greater). The standard width for teaching pools is normally 7.5m. ###3. Secondary Pools. Some swimming complexes have a second main pool (as well as the main pool and teaching pool). The referencing requirement is the same as the main pool ie. length, width, and maximum depth. ###4. Leisure Pools. The referencing requirement here is the water area of the pool. Leisure pools are normally irregularly shaped and accurate measurement is likely to require scaling from plans as well as check measurements. Referencers should also inquire whether the Management of the hereditament can supply the water area of the leisure pool. Flumes which are part of leisure pools should be noted but do not need to be measured. Where flumes have been added to conventional pools see note 8 below. ###5. Diving Pools. For diving pools the referencing requirement is the length and width of the pool together with a note of the number of the type and height of the diving boards together with a note of which dimension is that of the board side of the pool (because of the need for a wider pool surround). It is also necessary to ascertain the location of the nearest alternative diving pool. Note on Diving Pools: Diving pools are relatively specialised and have a greater health and safety requirement due to the possibility of back injuries. Consequently many modern pools are constructed without diving facilities. Nonetheless diving pools also have several other uses, eg. sub aqua clubs, water polo clubs etc use them. Diving pools may be provided with adjustable floors which make them even more adaptable. ###6. Abnormal Pools. For any pool other than those covered above the referencing requirement is for the water area and the surround area, and the maximum depth. ###7. Ancillary space to pools. (All to be measured separately, but no need to be distinguished between main, teaching and diving): * Surrounds * First Aid Room * Pool store(s) * Wet side changing (including tiled lobby areas and showers) * Wet side WCs (including tiled lobby areas) * Wet side plant rooms housing wave machines water treatment and heating plant * Wet side plant rooms housing air handling plant. If there is a single plant room housing both types of plant a judgement should be made about the proportion of space occupied by water treatment/heating plant. If air handling plant serves both the wet and dry sides of the hereditament, no apportionment of air handling plant-room space between wet and dry is needed. ###8. Flumes. Those flumes which are built as part of a leisure pool are reflected and do not need referencing. A separate addition is made for the cost of flumes added to conventional pools. The referencing requirement in these circumstances is the linear run of the flume. ###9. Saunas and Solaria. Referencing requirement - actual areas of the rooms in use, and changing and stores specific to the facility. Note: These areas are valued at the wet rate to reflect the plant requirements. ###10. Wet Side Seating. Referencing requirement: preferably count the number of seats, if this is impractical for some reason (eg. the seats are not fixed) measure the area reserved for wet side seating. Note on wet side seating: Wet side seating has a higher space requirement than dry side seating, (due to the greater plant requirement for the damp air). Wet side seating may appear to be little used, but may be busy for galas or during children’s lessons. ###11. Outdoor Pools. Referencing requirements – water area and maximum depth, and measurement to GIA of all the associated buildings, including the plant rooms, and changing rooms. **B. Referencing and Valuation requirements for Ice Rinks (where a subsidiary part of the hereditament)** ###12. Ice rinks. Referencing requirement is the area of the Ice and the area of the surround. Measurement of the plantrooms and changing areas is also required, in addition to ancillary areas mentioned below. **C. Referencing requirements for Dry Areas** ###13. Main Halls. Provided the main hall is laid out to badminton the main referencing requirement is a count of the number of courts, together with a note of the overall dimensions. **Notes on main halls:** Most halls are considered in the industry in terms of the number of badminton courts, but there will be instances where the hall exceeds the area required for badminton for other reasons. Eg. it is used for other purposes such as entertainment, or craft fairs etc, or it is primarily used for sports other than badminton. Therefore enquiry should be made of all the different uses to which the hall is (or is intended to be) put, and these uses should be noted. See also notes on dry side seating. ###14. Gymnasiums. Referencing requirement:- the number of stations (ie. machines), and the overall dimensions of the Gym as a check. **Note on Gymnasiums:** In recent years use of exercise machines has become increasingly popular, and many older centres have converted areas to use of gyms (eg. squash courts which have fallen from favour) and many centres have cramped gyms as demand for the machines is high. Gyms are just as likely to be found in wet centres as dry. ###15. Multi-function rooms. Eg. Dance Studios, aerobic rooms, and rooms that can be used for a number of less mainstream sports eg. Table Tennis. These are uses that require a changing facility. Referencing requirement: Area in use and note of actual or intended uses. The management should be requested to provide the maximum capacity in persons. **Note on Multi-function rooms:** Areas such as dance studios have a relatively high changing requirement compared with main halls (because a relatively high number of people can be accommodated at once). ###16. Other public Rooms. Referencing requirement: GIA in use. **Note:** This applies to areas available for use by the public, which do not have a changing requirement, eg. Crèches (for use over short periods) Meeting rooms, and rooms used for sports that do not require changing facilities eg. snooker room. ###17. Bowling Halls. Referencing requirement: the number of rinks, and the area of the hall and stores. Note: this does not apply to purpose built bowling centres. ###18. Dry Side Seating. Referencing requirement: the number of seats, or if impractical, area of seating. **Note on Dry side Seating:** Similar considerations apply to wet side seating, except that in some centres the dry side seating may double as part of the bar area or cafe and in such instances it should be treated with the bar area. In Halls used for important competitions there may be areas of fixed or movable seating in the hall. Fixed seating should be added separately as above, but movable seating may take up some space used at other times for general sports. ###19. Squash Courts. Referencing requirement: number of courts is all that is required – subject to the note below. **Notes on Squash Courts:** In the late 1990s squash has become increasingly less popular and in many centres the number of courts has been reduced by conversion to other uses, eg. crèches, and gyms. It should be noted if there are squash courts that are unused. ###20. Ancillary space to dry side. (All to be measured separately, but no need to be distinguished between main, teaching and diving): * First Aid Room * Store(s) for equipment and/or seating * Dry side changing (including lobby areas and showers), with a note of the number of changing spaces * Dry side WCs (including lobby areas) * Dry side plant rooms housing heating and/or air handling plant. If the same plant room also accommodates electrical intake or generating plant, the proportion of space occupied by electrical plant should be estimated. ###21. External Changing Facilities. This means areas used for changing for outdoor sports facilities, (eg. Football Pitches etc). The referencing requirement is the actual area in use (including showers lobbies and toilets), and as a check the total number of spaces. **Note:** Most centres will have separate changing areas for the outside pitches and sports facilities complete with separate showers. It is important to ascertain the number of spaces involved (not forgetting the referees’ etc for local sport leagues). **D Referencing requirements for Tennis Centres/ Tennis Halls** ###22 Main Hall Most tennis halls are exclusively devoted to tennis as a single use. The primary referencing requirement is the number of tennis courts together with a note of the overall dimensions. **Notes on main halls:** Similar considerations may apply to those in badminton halls, i.e. there may be instances where the hall exceeds the area required for tennis for other reasons. Eg. it is used for other purposes such as entertainment. Therefore enquiry should be made of all the different uses to which the hall is (or is intended to be) put, and these uses should be noted. See also notes on dry side seating. ###23 Air –Supported Tennis Halls Most tennis centres will have external tennis courts and in some cases some may be covered by air supported buildings. These may be of single skin polythene or polyester of single our double skin construction (More detail of the construction can be found in the VO cost guide). A note of the construction is required, together with the number of courts covered. NB this information is in addition to the information required for the court itself and the court lighting. **Polythene covers (but not polyester)** have a short life and can be regarded as de minimis **E. Referencing and Valuation requirements for Cafes and Bars and Retail areas** Note: these areas occur in both wet and dry centres and, in centres with both wet and dry facilities, are apportioned in the valuation between the wet and dry areas. ###24. Bar Areas. Referencing requirement: GIA of the bar area, together with any stores and preparation areas. ###25. Café Areas. Referencing requirement: number of covers, and the area in use including preparation areas and stores. **Note:** the area of preparation and seating is derived from the number of covers and this should be the preferred method, except where the area also doubles as spectator seating. ###26. Retail Areas. Referencing requirement: GIA of the shop and store area. ###27. Vending Areas. Referencing requirement: No. of covers of the associated seating and the number of vending machines. Alternatively the areas in use. **Note on vending areas:** This applies to food, drink or snack vending machines especially those that have associated seating. For Example it is not intended to apply to an odd drinks machine in a corridor. Vending areas may be found in small centres that do not have a separate café, or in large centres to supplement the café. **F. Referencing and Valuation requirements for external sports facilities** Note: All external sports facilities need to be separately included not only in the valuation, but also in the calculation of the size of the substitute hereditament, to allow for the land required. ###28. Tennis Courts. Referencing Requirement - Number and nature of surfacing of the courts and whether the courts are lit, NB sports council guidelines suggest there should be two external changing spaces per court. ###29. Grass Football and Hockey Pitches. Referencing Requirement – number and size of pitches. ###30. Astro-turf areas. Referencing Requirement - Area (see also Lighting below). ###31. Lighting to pitches and tennis courts. Referencing requirement: the height of the columns, the number of lamps per column and their rating in watts. ###32. Other Sports Surfaces. Full details of any other sports facilities not included above are required. ###33. Other Buildings. Other buildings may be encountered such as sports pavilions, mower stores etc, and these will require referencing to GIA, with full details to assist the valuation, and also a note of the footprint of the building. **G. Referencing and Valuation requirements for external Works** **34.** Full referencing details of the externals are not required, however a note of the nature of the site will be required. In addition a note of the total number of parking spaces will be needed. **H. Areas that do not require referencing in detail** **35.** There are many areas in a centre that do not require detailed referencing as they can in aggregate be found by deduction of other areas from overall GIA, and are normally valued by means of inclusion in a “circulation addition”. These include:
Manager’s offices and Administration areas In circulation addition
Staff Changing In circulation addition
Toilets for visitors (non players)/staff In circulation addition
Circulation space Circulation addition
##Appendix 2: Aide memoir for inspection of local authority sports centres, tennis centres, swimming pools & leisure centres
Main Pool Count the lane lines, these usually appear in the MIDDLE of each lane, but occasionally define the lane edges. Note maximum depth. Also note whether 50m, 25m (modern standards), or 33m or 20m pool. Measure length & width as some pools are non-standard.
Learner Pool Count the lane lines if possible and note the hall in which it is. Also measure the pool area. This helps us choose the right type.
Ancillary Or Abnormal Pool Measure Water area. Note maximum depth.  
Leisure Pool Water Measure water area.  
Leisure Pool Surround Measure dry area.  
Pool Viewing Count seats. Ask about usage and gala events.
Sauna/Solaria Measure just the room in which the main facilities are and mark on the plan. Do not measure the WCs, showers, changing etc. If small, perhaps without changing etc., measure whole area.
Flume Note length and whether covered flume or open slide. Note whether used with leisure pool or standard pool.
Main Hall Note the number of badminton courts. Note if larger than normal and why.
Ancillary/Abnormal Hall Either count the number of badminton courts or measure.  
Bowls Hall Count the rinks.  
Tennis Hall Note the number of tennis courts. Note if larger than normal and why.
Fitness Suites/Gyms Count the stations in the gym and note this on the plan. Stations are each individual activity and include warm up mats.
Squash Courts Count the courts and note on the plan. Note if courts are disused.
Multi Use Physical eg. aerobics hall, note activity and measure. (This needs changing facilities.)
Activity Non Physical eg. meeting room note activity and measure. (This does not need changing facilities.)
Dry Viewing Count the seats.  
Shop Measure.  
Crèche Note place, and measure. If crèche is part of the bar do not double count.
Snooker/Pool Measure.  
Function Room Measure. Include any dedicated kitchen etc.
Sport Treatment Room Measure and note on plan.  
Open Air Pool Buildings Measure.  
Café Count covers.  
All Weather Pitches Count number and measure area.  
Tennis Courts Hard Count number.  
Lighting Columns Count number and type.  
Open Air Pool Measure water area and hard surround.  
Grass Football Hockey Pitches Count number of pitches, and measure pitch areas. This aids dealing with external changing requirement.
Any Outside Bowling Greens Measure area, note if crown or flat.  
Note the location:- city/town centre, suburban, rural, and whether it is an island site, landscaped or with car park. Notional Areas for Main Facilities to compare with actual on site
Sports Halls based on Badminton Courts
  Court Facility Hall Size Store area
  1 Court Hall 162 20.3
  2 court hall 297.0 37.1
  3 court hall 508.0 63.5
  4 court hall 594.0 74.3
  5 court hall 765.0 95.6
  6 court hall 891.0 111.4
  7 court hall 1,062.0 132.8
  8 court hall 1,221.0 152.6
  9 court hall 1,377.0 172.1
  10 court hall 1,485.0 185.6
  12 court hall 1,782.0 222.8
 
 
Tennis Halls Based on Number of Courts
  1 Court Hall 668.9 5.2
  2 Court hall 1226.2 10.4
  3 Court hall 1783.5 15.6
  4 Court hall 2340.8 20.8
  5 Court hall 2898.2 26
  6 Court hall 3455.5 31.2
  7 Court hall 4012.8 36.4
  8 Court hall 4570.2 41.6
  9 Court hall 5127.5 46.8
  10 Court hall 5684.8 52
 
 
Swimming Pools Main based on 25m standard
Number of Lanes Main Pool 25m Water area Surround area
       
4 25 x 9 swim pool 225.0 165.0
5 25 x 11 swim pool 275.0 175.0
6 25 x 13 swim pool 325.0 185.0
7 25 x 15 swim pool 375.0 200.0
8 25 x 17 swim pool 425.0 205.0
 
 
Swimming Pools Main based on 50m standard
Number of Lanes Main Pool 50m Water area Surround area
       
8 50 x 17 swim pool 850.0 305.0
##Appendix 3: Additional notes for valuers local authority sports centres, tennis centres, swimming pools & leisure centres This appendix is intended to give further information on the concepts behind the design of the substitute building, and on the valuation of the hereditament by reference to the cost of the substitute building. Reference is made only to those items where it is necessary to give additional information to that contained within the practice notes and referencing guides (Appendices 1 and 2). ###1. Design of the substitute Building **1.1.** The Basic Concept of the Substitute The basic design of a modern leisure centre is of a building with wet and/or dry hall(s), and/or tennis hall of single storey construction housing the main sports facilities. The hall or halls are linked to a two storey block which contains all other facilities, the changing rooms, bar, café, reception, offices etc. **1.2.** All pools are contained in a single ‘wet’ hall. **1.3.** The main dry facilities are contained in a separate hall, and there may be separate halls for indoor bowls, and in some cases there is also a hall for tennis. ###2. Main Pools **2.1** All modern swimming pools are constructed to one of two lengths, 25m or 50m (Olympic Length). Currently there is only a small number of 50m pools in the united Kingdom, though several new ones have been constructed in recent years. The width of the pool varies between 4 and 10 lanes dependent upon the level of use envisaged. For example, many pools are 6 lanes in width, but smaller country towns may have a 4 lane pool, whereas important pools in larger towns and cities may be 8 or even 10 lanes wide. 2.2 It follows that the substitute pool should normally be one of these two lengths. However there are many older pools that are not built to one of the standard lengths; in particular many swimming pools constructed in the 1960s and early 1970s are 33m in length. This was then considered a standard length. Such pools should always be valued by reference to a replacement pool of 25m, but when valuing a “busy” pool, consideration should be given to envisaging a wider substitute to offset the reduction in water area. 2.3** Example 1. A 1960s pool of 33m by 6 lanes (13m width). The normal replacement would be a 25m 6 lane pool. **2.4** Example 2. As above, but the pool is particularly well used. The replacement modern pool would be 25m by 8 lanes (17m width). **2.5** Example 3. The existing pool is 20m by 10m. As the existing length is less than the smallest modern standard, it would be appropriate to use a substitute pool of the same size as the existing pool. ###3. Teaching Pools **3.1** The modern concept of pool design includes a teaching pool at the foot of the main pool within the same hall. The length of the teaching pool is usually the same as the width of the main pool (or 13m which ever is the greater), and 7.5m in width. If the existing pool is larger, then the size of the existing pool should be adopted provided there is sufficient demand to justify it. **3.2** Example 1. Substitute main pool is 25m by 13m (6 lanes) - the teaching pool would normally be 13m by 7.5. **3.3** Example 2. Substitute main pool is 50m by 21m (10 lanes) – the teaching pool would normally be 21m by 7.5m. **3.4** Example 3. An older 33m pool has a teaching pool which is 20m by 10m – retain the size of the existing teaching pool, provided the demand is sufficient. ###4. Secondary pools Some pools have a second main pool. The considerations here are similar to the main pool in section 3 above. ###5. Diving pools **5.1** Many older pools have a diving pit (usually 3.8m deep) as part of the main pool either in the length of the main pool or directly to one side, so the water forms an ‘L’ shape. Neither of these arrangements would be allowed in a modern pool because of health and safety considerations, and a substitute diving pool would be built as a separate pool within the wet hall. Diving pools may attract other users which need deeper water, such as sub-aqua clubs, life saving clubs, and water polo clubs. **5.2** Diving pools are less likely to be constructed in a modern centre, partly because of health and safety concerns. Nonetheless some high quality diving pools have been constructed in recent years. Pools used solely for diving create little need for changing facilities compared with other types of pool, however some of the best modern diving facilities have diving pools with movable floors (from 6m to 0m depth) and can be used for a variety of other uses, eg. water polo or water aerobics and in such cases consideration should be given to treating the pool as an abnormal pool which gives rise to a greater changing room space. This is only likely to apply in top quality modern diving pools eg. the new diving facility in Southampton. ###6. Leisure Pools These may be found as a pure leisure pool, or along with conventional swimming pools. There has been some decline in the popularity of leisure pools in recent years. In modern designs the leisure pool is likely to be constructed along side the swimming pool within the main hall. ###7. Squash Courts Squash courts have become decreasingly popular in recent years. As squash has declined, many courts have been converted to other uses. This is particularly true in the 2000 list. ###8. Fitness Gyms Fitness gyms on the other hand have become increasingly popular, and as they are financially attractive centre managers have sought to increase provision of gyms and gym equipment, indeed many squash courts have been converted to gyms. In many cases gym equipment is allocated less than the ideal amount of space, and the substitute hereditament envisages often that the gym will be greater in size than the existing facility. ###9. Tennis Centres Tennis centres are dealt with largely in the same way as dry Halls and are similarly based upon the number of courts. Unlike the hall in dry centres tennis halls are usually single use halls. Most Tennis halls are built to lower specification than dry halls, and have lower degrees of heating ( in some cases heating has been removed from tennis halls as not being required), and the adopted costs are naturally lower. For this reason it is unlikely that Tennis hall will qualify for a reduction for lower quality. ###10. The Valuation Process **10.1** Following the East Sussex Cases and the resulting negotiations a substitute building approach has been agreed, full details of which are set out in the practice note for the 1990, 1995 and 2000 lists. **10.2** The substitute building approach inherently deals with the superfluity due to excess size of older facilities, (eg. 33m pools) and the excess running costs it generates is dealt with by the special allowance in the valuation scheme. It follows that no further adjustment should be made to reflect them. **10.3** The East Sussex Cases concerned the Sovereign Centre at Eastbourne and the Goldsmiths Centre in Crowborough. It is agreed that these two centres represent the normal range of quality within which the substitute hereditament would fall. It has been agreed that a variation of plus or minus 5% can be made, for centres of **unusually** high or low quality, within the valuation. It follows that no variation should be made for centres which fall in the range of quality represented by these two centres. To that end photographs of the Sovereign and Goldsmith Centres are reproduced below. Goldsmiths (Crowborough, East Sussex) Goldsmiths (Crowborough, East Sussex) Sovereign Centre: the Competition Pool (Eastbourne, East Sussex) Sovereign Centre : the Leisure Pool (Eastbourne, East Sussex) Photographs of two further centres are included below, that of the Littledown Centre in Bournemouth, as an example of a centre where a 5% increase for quality is appropriate, and of Southglades, Nottingham, where a 5% decrease is appropriate. Littledown Centre (Bournemouth) Littledown Centre (Bournemouth) Southglades (Nottingham) Southglades (Nottingham) **10.4** There is provision to make allowance in the valuation specific to diving pools. This follows directly from the East Sussex decisions, and arises because of the reduced provision of diving pools in modern centres. It is based on the proximity of neighbouring centre. **10.5** The contract size adjustments shown in the VO Cost Guide are not appropriate to this class. **10.6** Note that land values within central and inner London have not been agreed for this class. ##Practice note 1: 2010: Local authority sports centres, tennis centres, swimming pools & leisure centres This document provides recommendations on the valuation of Local Authority Sports and Leisure Centres, and is based on agreements in force for earlier lists which in turn were based on the East Sussex Lands Tribunal (Upper Tribunal –Lands Chamber) Hearing. It has been discussed and agreed with agents acting on behalf of a large number of local authorities. Note: The rate per square metre for 50m swimming pool has not been agreed by all of the agents who were involved in the central discussions with the VOA Local Authority Leisure Centres are a Specialised Class. ###1. Exclusions This practice note does not apply to Centres entirely built as an ice rink or a bowls hall. For the avoidance of doubt private sports and leisure facilities are a separate class see Rating Manual Section 6 - Part 3 - Section 965. ###2. Definitions The term “wet area” as used in this practice note means “The pool and spa facilities plus surrounding areas and ancillary uses as appropriately apportioned by the calculator sheet embedded in the Non –Bulk server.” The term “dry area” as used in this practice note means “Sports halls, gymnasiums, multifunctional rooms , squash courts and other public rooms together with associated changing rooms and seating areas and other ancillary uses as appropriately apportioned by the calculator sheet embedded in the Non –Bulk server.” These definitions have not been discussed with the agents who were involved in central discussions with the VOA ###3. The Pre -Valuation Process The unit of assessment should be identified in accordance with established rating principles. It is possible that a café, beauty clinic, crèche, physiotherapist, clothing /equipment shop etc maybe present and in the paramount occupation of someone other than the centre operator. Prior to commencing the valuation process the following key information is required: * The date when the centre was opened to the public. * The gross internal area as at the material day. 1. The actual gross internal area is to be used on all centres opened after 1/4/2000 and any Centre where the Table 1 area is greater than the existing. However the current area can still be adjusted for areas of obvious redundant space. 2. Where the existing area is used in preference to the Table 1 area then the existing area used shall be adjusted between wet and dry to the proportions calculated by the Table 1 area. 3. When inspecting a centre the following key factors should be established with Centre Management: * If a sports hall is present, ascertain what is the primary sport for which it is laid out. In most instances it will be badminton. Select the composite area from Table 1 to suit the hall. When the hall is regularly used for non-sporting activities, ascertain whether any change in hall size will compromise these activities. If so, adopt the area required in order to accommodate these activities. A separate part of table 1 provides for tennis halls, based upon the number of tennis courts. * Ancillary dry sports hall should be noted and facilities provided in accordance with Table 1. * When viewing a room/hall for its classification it needs to be established whether or not its use requires changing facilities. The gym or dance studio will need to provide changing facilities, whereas a crèche/meeting room for hire would not. * When including facilities into Table 1, note their existing use. An old traditional sauna would for example be replaced in the simple substitute with a smaller area with modern equipment. * When selecting the size of a swimming pool for the purpose of calculating the notional substitute all pools should be taken to be either 25 or 50m long (unless existing are shorter than 25m). The number of existing lanes selects the width (the standard adopted is 2m per lane plus 1m). In most instances the existing number of lanes will be replicated. Very popular 6 lanes x 33m pools could be replaced with 8 lane x 25m pools. Actual pool usage should inform whether to value a 6*25 or an 8*25 pool. Training pool length is normally selected by the width of main pool x the standard width of 7.5m. In the event of a narrower main pool of 13m then a 13m training pool should be provided. If in doubt replace the pool with a similar total water area. * It is essential that if smaller pools are built to “short competition standard ” they are correctly identified and recorded as main pools. If not to competition standard then they should be recorded as secondary pools * The areas of purpose built leisure pools are calculated based upon the actual water area and surround. The actual leisure pool water area, and the area of the surround should therefore be used. * Any viewing areas need only be replaced with an allowance, as calculated by the table for those seating spaces in current use. In most instances dry viewing will be from the first floor bar lounge area. * Ancillary activities should be included based upon the use at 1/4/2008 but having regard to subsequent material changes in circumstances. No account needs to be recorded of the following, as these are included within the general space or the composite totals in Table 1: Circulation. Storage. Changing wet, dry and group. Plant. Reception. Public Toilets. First Aid. Administration. Staff changing and rest rooms. 4. Within the simple substitute the diving pool area is subject to a utilisation factor. Firstly it needs to be established where the nearest diving pool is. If the nearest centre is within 60 minutes drive time then the **Table 1** area can be reduced by 25%. If the nearest centre is within 30 minutes drive time then the total area can be reduced by 50%. A further reduction could apply in circumstances where the diving pool has been subject to a later addition of a leisure pool. 5. Within the simple substitute the fitness gym may be subject to a utilisation factor where a privately operated fitness gym lies within the catchment area or otherwise comes into competition with the subject hereditament, provided it can be demonstrated that there is a significant and ongoing effect on the admission figures for the subject hereditament that are not attributable to any other factors, * The agreed concept of the simple substitute is a central core with entrance and catering at first floor, with changing under. The classification of the type A and type B space in **Table 1** identifies areas that would be expected to be of single or two-storey height, which is only of relevance when calculating the footprint for land value. * The rates agreed reflect the difference in construction costs between wet, tennis and dry facilities. This distinction is important. * The café and bar areas are to be allocated between wet, tennis and dry proportional to the calculation of the wet, tennis and dry split. * The addition of 9% on to the calculated wet and dry area covers the areas that do not need to be separately appraised, namely staff rooms, admin, reception, public toilets, and circulation space around the facilities. This property is valued using the non-bulk server. The manual can be accessed here. ###4. The Valuation Process Stage 1 Costs 1. Select the construction cost for the component parts of the Centre, the mean rates are: * £1050/m2 for dry use, * £440/m2 for tennis halls. * £1850/m2 for wet, £2,350/m2 where a 50m pool (The figure of £2350 is not agreed by all of the agents who were involved in the central discussions with the VOA . In the event of a dispute advice should be sought from NSU) * £1195/m2 for the extra cost of leisure fit out. 2. There is a 5% maximum fluctuation for centres of differing quality (tennis halls are of low spec. and have been costed accordingly so a quality reduction is unlikely to be appropriate for tennis halls). The mean should apply to centres built entirely of brick and centres clad with a reasonable amount of fenestration. The Littledown Centre is being put forward as an illustration of a centre with a high level of fenestration. The Sovereign Centre and the Goldsmith Centre being the mean and the Southglades Centre is below the average. The photographs in appendix 3 illustrate the differences in appearance of these Centres. It will be up to local negotiations to agree where the centre in question falls. Where external swimming pools form part of the complex then the water area should be valued at £535/m2. Where ice rinks need to be valued as part of a complex then the ice area shall be treated as if it was a leisure pool. * Air Supported tennis hall of double skin polyester fabric should be included at a cost of £65,000 per court, over and above the cost of the playing surface, and lighting (£50,000 if single skin). Polythene covers have a very short life and can be treated as de minimis. In accordance with sports council guidance two extra changing spaces should be provided for each outdoor court (including those in air supported structures) * Costs of External Features: 1.Flumes over main pools (not leisure pools) - £1,917 per m in length 2.Tennis Court (hard) - £17,000 per court +£600 per m2 of land. Add a further £13,000 if externally illuminated. 3.Astroturf areas -£57 m2 4.Lighting of Sports Pitches (Cost accounts for the safety aspect of lighting as well as size): Hockey Pitch - £52,000 per pitch Football Pitch - £42,000 per pitch Rugby Pitch - £ 50,000 per pitch * exceptional cases where car parking has been provided within the hereditament ,that in addition to the sports centre, serves other separately assessed hereditaments then this should be added at £1400 per additional space * Other Items should be added according to information within the 2010 cost guide, or if there is not such information available further advice should be taken. * For example costings for athletics tracks should be taken from the cost guide. (They should not be taken at an equivalent area of astro turf since the costs are significantly different). * External works should be valued on the basis on Table 3 having regard to the site characteristics of the actual Centre. Therefore type 1 covers town centre sites with nominal perimeter space. Type 2 and 3 Centres will have significant landscaping, but type 2 is for Centres without parking and type 3 is for Centres with parking. The percentage addition covers the cost normal parking, landscaping, and services. Any other features should be separately valued. * Select location factor from Table 2. * Add 10% to all costs for professional fees and other charges. ###5. The Valuation Process Stage 2 Age and Obsolescence Allowances 1. Select age allowance from Table 4 based upon whether wet or dry side and the age when the facility was opened. Where a centre has been substantially refurbished, it will be necessary to consider the appropriate age to adopt for the purposes of any Age and Obsolescence Allowance to be applied at Stage 2 of the valuation this will be a matter of valuer judgement, but it should be borne in mind that it is unlikely that major parts of the structure will have been renewed. As such the appropriate date will always be between the date of construction but someway prior to the date of refurbishment, as this would reflect the age and obsolescence of a whole centre being built as at that latter date. The use of equated age to reflect refurbishment should be recorded in Column Q rather than changing the age in Col D which must always reflect the actual date of construction. No age allowance should be applied to site value, except in London where a site value of more than £50,000 per hectare has been adopted. 2. In exceptional circumstances, the A&O allowance appropriate to the wet area may be increased by an additional 5% .This will only apply to those sports centres built prior to 1980 and which have not been subject to a scheme of modernisation or improvement. Under no circumstances should this allowances be conceded without prior inspection . ###6. The Valuation Process Stage 3 Land Value Ascertain the actual site area and apply the values in accordance with Table 5 ###7. The Valuation Process Stage 4 Decapitalisation Apply the de-capitalisation rate of 5% in England, 4.5% in Wales ###8. The Valuation Process Stage 5 End Allowances Excess Running Costs of the centre based upon the difference in the actual area of the centre and the area of the simple substitute building. Apply % reduction as per Table 6. For the avoidance of doubt the GIA of any buildings at the hereditament which are not included in the table 1 area should not be included in the calculation of this end allowance. * For example a leisure centre with wet and dry facilities has an area of 3500m2, plus there is an athletics track with a grandstand of 400m2 and a grounds mans store of 50m2. The calculation shows the GIA of the leisure centre alone could be replaced by a centre of 3000 m2. The allowance for excess size should be based on the area of 3000m2 compared with the actual area of 3500m2. It should not be based on 3000m2 compared with (3500+400+50)=3950m2 * a sports centre has oil, LPG fired heating or electrical heating, an end allowance of 5% shall be applied to the valuation * Where the construction or design of the roof structure is not typical for the age or type of building and thereby creates an exceptional year on year repair liability over and above what could reasonably be expected, consideration should be given to making an allowance at stage 5. * Other Stage 5 adjustments: 1.Valuers to use own judgement over additional adjustment. 2.Fragmentation or several buildings. 3.Defects in the building i.e. pool tiling and halls which cannot accept all sports. 4.Inadequate parking. **Table 1 - Schedule of Facilities - Agreed Area for Each Activity**
Element Area in m2 Rate Build Type Comments
1 Court hall 212.1 L A Hall selected on the basis of number of badminton courts in current use, exceptions being small halls where they would be replaced at their current size, or halls used primarily for other sports or non sports activities requiring a larger hall to a different standard.
2 Court hall 383.9 L A Hall selected on the basis of number of badminton courts in current use, exceptions being small halls where they would be replaced at their current size, or halls used primarily for other sports or non sports activities requiring a larger hall to a different standard.
3 Court hall 621.4 L A
4 Court hall 767.8 L A
5 Court Hall 960.1 L A
6 Court Hall 1,151.7 L A
7 Court Hall 1344.0 L A
8 Court Hall 1572.7 L A
9 Court Hall 1773.0 L A
10 Court Hall 1894.5 L A
12 Court Hall 2303.3 L A
1 Lane Bowls Hall 209.1 L A In addition an extra allowance should be made for dry changing if necessary at 3.11m2/space.
2 Lane Bowls Hall 395.2 L A
3 Lane Bowls Hall 581.3 L A
4 Lane Bowls Hall 767.4 L A
5 Lane Bowls Hall 953.4 L A
6 Lane Bowls Hall 1139.5 L A
7 Lane Bowls Hall 1325.6 L A
8 Lane Bowls Hall 1511.7 L A
9 Lane Bowls Hall 1697.7 L A
10 Lane Bowls Hall 1883.8 L A
12 Lane Bowls Hall 2256.0 L A
1 Court Tennis Hall 692.3 T A Select on the basis of the number of tennis courts
2 Court Tennis Hall 1273.0 T A
3 Court Tennis Hall 1853.7 T A
4 Court Tennis Hall 2434.4 T A
5 Court Tennis Hall 3015.2 T A
6 Court Tennis Hall 3595.9 T A
7 Court Tennis Hall 4176.6 T A
8 Court Tennis Hall 4757.4 T A
9 Court Tennis Hall 5338.1 T A
10 Court Tennis Hall 5918.9 T A
Abnormal Hall L A Take hall area + 12½% for storage + 3.11m2 per changing space. Number of spaces to reflect the primary use of hall.
Dry viewing when not bar lounge L B 0.6m2 per space.
Fitness gym L B Quantity of stations x 5m2 x 1.622.
Multi use room L B Area in use + 3.11m2 per changing space necessary for primary use (ideally 1 per 5m2).
Squash court L A 73m2 per Court.
External change L B 2.35m2 per Space.
25 x 9 Swimming pool 737.9 H A Standard pool for most circumstances is 25 x 13, smaller pools chosen to match existing, larger pools where existing demand requires.
25 x 13 Swimming pool 955.5 H A
25 x 17 Swimming pool 1173.1 H A
50 x 17 Swimming pool 2194.4 H A
13 x 7½ Swimming pool 270.8 H A Learner pool selected on the basis of the width of the main pool, unless it is less than 13m then 13m should be used.
17 x 7½ Swimming pool 343.0 H A
Abnormal swimming pool H A Take water area x 1.945 and surround area x 1.15 +110.4m2 for first aid, store and group change.
Leisure pool H A Measure existing water area x 1.83 and surround area x 1.15 add 10 -15m2 for pools without other main swimming pools.
Diving pool 320.6 H A Area required for a 3m high board and 2 springboards.
Pool side viewing H B 0.69m2 per space.
Sauna/sun beds etc H B Based on existing use but adjusted for area replaced with modern equipment.
Café with food prep/ warm up L B As existing but adjusted for superfluity, as a guide 75m2 + 1.9m2 per cover (seat).
Vending area if no Café L B As existing but adjusted for superfluity, as a guide 1m2 per machine together with 1.9m2 per cover (seat) if space provided outside of main circulation for seating.
Bar lounge/dry viewing L B Based on existing but adjusted for area in use.
Retail shop L B Based on existing but adjusted for utilisation.
Other L/H B Area and rate subject to existing use.
Public toilets, reception, administration, staff areas and circulation L/H B 9% of total area calculated above.
Note all areas are inclusive of plant, changing rooms and store.
Table 2 - Location Factor Index
Region County Location Factor
Northern Region Cleveland, including Hartlepool, Stockton on Tees, Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland 0.99
Cumbria 1.02
Durham 0.98
Northumberland 1.02
Tyne & Wear 0.98
Yorkshire and Humberside Region Humberside, including East Yorkshire, Holderness, Kingston on Hull, North Lincolnshire, NE Lincolnshire, Boothferry and Beverley 0.94
North Yorkshire 0.98
South Yorkshire 0.96
West Yorkshire 0.94
East Midlands Region Derbyshire 0.93
Leicestershire, including Rutland 0.93
Lincolnshire 0.92
Northamptonshire 0.98
Nottinghamshire 0.92
East Anglia Region Cambridgeshire 0.99
Norfolk 0.93
Suffolk 0.95
South East Region (Excluding London Bedfordshire, including Luton 1.04
Essex 1.05
Hertfordshire 1.09
Kent 1.07
Surrey 1.12
East Sussex 1.08
West Sussex 1.07
Berkshire 1.07
Buckinghamshire 1.05
Hampshire 1.03
Isle of Wight 1.04
Oxfordshire 1.01
Greater London Barking & Dagenham 1.07
Barnet 1.12
Bexley 1.14
Brent 1.14
Bromley 1.11
Camden 1.26
City of London 1.20
City of Westminster 1.26
Croydon 1.15
Ealing 1.15
Enfield 1.09
Greenwich 1.15
Hackney 1.19
Hammersmith & Fulham 1.22
Haringey 1.20
Harrow 1.10
Havering 1.02
Hillingdon 1.10
Hounslow 1.09
Islington 1.20
Kensington & Chelsea 1.27
Kingston Upon Thames 1.17
Lambeth 1.20
Lewisham 1.11
Merton 1.16
Newham 1.08
Redbridge 1.07
Richmond Upon Thames 1.14
Southwark 1.20
Sutton 1.12
Tower Hamlets 1.18
Waltham Forest 1.10
Wandsworth 1.20
Avon, including North Somerset, Bristol, Bath and Northeast Somerset and South Gloucestershire 1.03
South Western Region Cornwall 1.01
Devon 1.00
Dorset 1.03
Gloucestershire 1.03
Somerset 1.00
Wiltshire 1.02
Hereford & Worcester 0.93
West Midlands Region Shropshire 0.92
Staffordshire 0.90
Warwickshire 0.95
West Midlands 0.93
Cheshire 0.90
North West Region Greater Manchester 0.91
Lancashire 0.90
Merseyside 0.91
Clwyd 0.93
Wales Dyfed 0.99
Gwent 0.97
Gwynedd 0.95
Mid Glamorgan 0.97
Powys 0.96
South Glamorgan 0.98
West Glamorgan 0.95
Table 3 - External Works
Characteristics of existing Centre Wet only Dry only Wet and Dry
Type 1: Town centre location with nominal space around Centre 1.00% 2.50% 1.75%
Type 2: Centre with landscaping but no parking 2.50% 4.50% 3.50%
Type 3: Centre with Parking 7.50% 10.00% 8.75%
Table 4 Age and Obsolescence Allowance
Date of Construction Basic Age & Obsolescence Dry Side Differential Dry Side Allowance Basic Age & Obsolescence Wet Side Differential Wet Side Allowance
2010 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
2009 0.5% 0.0% 0.5% 0.5% 0.0% 0.5%
2008 1.0% 0.0% 1.0% 1.0% 0.0% 1.0%
2007 1.5% 0.0% 1.5% 1.5% 0.0% 1.5%
2006 2.0% 0.0% 2.0% 2.0% 0.0% 2.0%
2005 2.5% 0.0% 2.5% 2.5% 0.0% 2.5%
2004 3.0% 0.0% 3.0% 3.0% 0.0% 3.0%
2003 3.5% 0.0% 3.5% 3.5% 0.0% 3.5%
2002 4.0% 0.0% 4.0% 4.0% 0.0% 4.0%
2001 4.5% 0.0% 4.5% 4.5% 0.0% 4.5%
2000 5.0% 0.0% 5.0% 5.0% 0.0% 5.0%
1999 6.0% 0.0% 6.0% 6.0% 0.0% 6.0%
1998 7.0% 0.0% 7.0% 7.0% 0.0% 7.0%
1997 8.0% 0.0% 8.0% 8.0% 0.0% 8.0%
1996 9.0% 0.0% 9.0% 9.0% 0.0% 9.0%
1995 10.0% 0.0% 10.0% 10.0% 0.0% 10.0%
1994 11.0% 1.0% 12.0% 11.0% 1.0% 12.0%
1993 12.0% 2.0% 14.0% 12.0% 2.0% 14.0%
1992 13.0% 3.0% 16.0% 13.0% 3.0% 16.0%
1991 14.0% 4.0% 18.0% 14.0% 4.0% 18.0%
1990 15.0% 5.0% 20.0% 15.0% 5.0% 20.0%
1989 16.0% 6.0% 22.0% 16.0% 6.0% 22.0%
1988 17.0% 7.0% 24.0% 17.0% 7.0% 24.0%
1987 18.0% 8.0% 26.0% 18.0% 8.0% 26.0%
1986 19.0% 9.0% 28.0% 19.0% 9.0% 28.0%
1985 20.0% 10.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 30.0%
1984 21.0% 11.0% 32.0% 21.0% 11.5% 32.5%
1983 22.0% 12.0% 34.0% 22.0% 13.0% 35.0%
1982 23.0% 13.0% 36.0% 23.0% 14.5% 37.5%
1981 24.0% 14.0% 38.0% 24.0% 16% 40.0%
1980 25.0% 15.0% 40.0% 25.0% 17.5% 42.5%
1979 26.0% 16.0% 42.0% 26.0% 19.0% 45.0%
1978 27.0% 17.0% 44.0% 27.0% 20.5% 47.5%
1977 28.0% 18.0% 46.0% 28.0% 22.0% 50.0%
1976 29.0% 19.0% 48.0% 29.0% 23.5% 52.5%
1975 30.0% 20.0% 50.0% 30.0% 25.0% 55.0%
1974 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 31.0% 25.5% 56.5%
1973 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 32.0% 26.0% 58.0%
1972 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 33.0% 26.5% 59.5%
1971 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 34.0% 27.0% 61.0%
1970 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 35.0% 27.5% 62.5%
1969 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 36.0% 28.0% 64.0%
1968 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 37.0% 28.5% 65.5%
1967 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 38.0% 29.0% 67.0%
1966 Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 39.0% 29.5% 68.5%
1965 & before Over 50% by Agreement Over 50% by Agreement. Over 50% by Agreement 40.0% 30.0% 70%
Table 5-Land Values
Greater London area zone 1 (postal districts EC, WC, W1, W2, W11, W8, SW1, SW3, SW5, SW7 and SW10) £1,650,000 per hectare
Greater London area zone 2 (Greater London excluding zones 1 and 3) £175,000 per hectare
Greater London area zone 3 (within 4 miles of GLA boundary) £60,000* per hectare. Area to be calculated based upon simple substitute site
Inner M25 ring, Surrey, Berks and Herts £50,000* per hectare
North East £25,000 per hectare
Remainder of England and Wales £45,000* per hectare
*Values to be used unless transaction evidence within 2 miles of the existing centre indicates a different level. **Within Greater London, the zone 3 price also applies to hereditaments located on land previously public open space within zones 1 or 2. Within Greater London zone 2, the zone 3 price also applies to zone 2 hereditaments which might, without detriment to the communities which they serve, be located within zone 3, or where there is a reasonable expectation that existing public open space might be available for leisure Centre development. Similarly the zone 2 price applies to zone 1 hereditaments which might, without detriment to the communities which they serve, be located within zone 2.
Table 6 - Excess running costs
Reduction factor = (E-S)/E% Where E = Existing building area and S = Simple substitute building area, see paragraph 16
Reduction factor Adjust valuation by
1% 0.25%
2% 0.50%
3% 0.75%
4% 1.00%
5% 1.25%
6% 1.50%
7% 1.75%
8% 2.00%
9% 2.25%
10% 2.50%
11% 2.75%
12% 3.00%
13% 3.25%
14% 3.50%
15% 3.75%
16% 4.00%
17% 4.25%
18% 4.50%
19% 4.75%
20% 5.00%
21% 5.25%
22% 5.50%
23% 5.75%
24% 6.00%
25% 6.25%
26% 6.50%
27% 6.75%
28% 7.00%
29% 7.25%
30% 7.50%
##Practice note 1: 2005: Local authority sports centres, tennis centres, swimming pools & leisure centres **Valuation of Wet/Dry Leisure Centres - Based upon the East Sussex Tribunal Hearing** **Preamble** This document provides recommendations on the valuation of Local Authority Sports and Leisure Centres, and is based on the agreements in force for previous lists. It has been accepted by the Chief Executive of the Valuation Office Agency, following meetings attended by Iain Dewar of Wilks Head & Eve, Ian Charman of Turner Morum, Tom Dixon of Sanderson Wetherall and Terry Rapps of King Sturge.. **Exclusions** The methodology of tables 1 to 6 is not to be used when the Centre has been entirely built as an Ice Rink or a Bowls Hall. It is not necessarily appropriate where there was significant Grant Aid used to assist in the construction of the Centre. For the avoidance of doubt Private sports and leisure facilities are a separate class see: [Rating Manual: Section 6 Part 3: Section 965: Sports And Leisure Centres (Private)](https://www.gov.uk/guidance/rating-manual-section-6-part-3-valuation-of-all-property-classes/section-965-sports-and-leisure-centres-private) **Notes on Valuation Process** 1. Prior to commencing the Valuation process the following key information is required: a. The date when the Centre was opened to the Public. b. The gross internal area as at the material day. 1. The actual gross internal area is to be used on all Centres opened after 1/4/2000 and any Centre where the Table 1 area is greater than the existing. However the current area can still be adjusted for areas of obvious redundant space. 2. In instances where the existing area is used in preference to the Table 1 area then the existing area used shall be adjusted between Wet and Dry to the proportions calculated by the Table 1 area. 3. Upon visiting a Centre the following key factors should be established with Centre Management a. If a sports hall is present, ascertain what is the primary sport for which it is laid out. In most instances it will be badminton. Select the composite area from Table 1 to suit the hall. When the hall is regularly used for non-sporting activities, ascertain whether any change in hall size will compromise these activities. If so, adopt the area required in order to accommodate these activities. A separate part of table 1 provides for tennis halls, based upon the number of tennis courts. b. Ancillary dry sports hall shall be noted and facilities provided in accordance with Table 1. c. When viewing a room/hall for its classification it needs to be established whether or not its use requires changing facilities. The gym or dance studio will need to provide changing, whereas a crèche/meeting room for hire would not. d. When including facilities into Table 1 note should be taken of its existing use. An old traditional sauna would for example be replaced in the simple substitute with a smaller area with modern equipment. e. When selecting the size of swimming pools, all pools should be 25 or 50m long (unless existing are shorter than 25m). The number of existing lanes selects the width (the standard adopted is 2m per lane plus 1m). In most instances the existing number of lanes will be replicated. Very popular 6 lanes x 33m pools could be replaced with 8 lane x 25m pools. Actual pool usage should inform whether to value a 6*25 or an 8*25 pool. Training pool length is normally selected by the width of main pool x the standard width of 7.5m. In the event of a narrower main pool of 13m then a 13m training pool should be provided. If in doubt replace the pool with a similar total water area. f. The areas of purpose built Leisure pools are calculated based upon the actual water area and surround. The actual leisure pool water area, and the area of the surround should therefore be used. g. Any viewing areas need only be replaced with an allowance, as calculated by the table for those seating spaces in current use. In most instances dry viewing will be from the first floor bar lounge area. h. Ancillary activities should be included based upon the use at 1/4/2003 but having regard to subsequent material changes in circumstances. No account needs to be recorded of the following as these are included within the general space or the composite totals in Table 1: * Circulation. * Storage. * Changing wet, dry and group. * Plant. * Reception. * Public Toilets. * First Aid. * Administration. * Staff changing and rest rooms. Within the simple substitute the diving pool area is subject to a utilisation factor. Firstly it needs to be established where the nearest diving pool is. If the nearest Centre is within 60 minutes drive time then the Table 1 area can be reduced by 25%. If the nearest centre is within 30 minutes drive time then the total area can be reduced by 50%. A further reduction could apply in circumstances where the diving pool has been subject to a later addition of a leisure pool. i) Within the simple substitute the fitness gym may be subject to a utilisation factor where a privately operated fitness gym lies within the catchment area or otherwise comes into competition with the subject hereditament, provided it can be demonstrated that there is a significant and ongoing effect on the admission figures for the subject hereditament that are not attributable to any other factors, 1. The agreed concept of the simple substitute is a central core with entrance and catering at first floor, with changing under. The classification of the type A and type B space in Table 1 identifies areas that would be expected to be of single or two-storey height, which is only of relevance when calculating the footprint for land value. 2. The rates agreed reflect the difference in construction costs between wet, tennis and dry facilities. This distinction is important. 3. The café and bar areas are to be allocated between wet, tennis and dry proportional to the calculation of the wet, tennis and dry split. 4. The addition of 9% on to the calculated wet and dry area covers the areas that do not need to be separately appraised, namely staff rooms, admin, reception, public toilets, and circulation space around the facilities. 5. Select the construction cost for the component parts of the Centre, the mean rates are £735/m2 for dry use, £400/m2 for tennis halls £1435/m2 for wet and £935/m2 for the extra cost of leisure fit out. There is a 5% maximum fluctuation for centres of differing quality (tennis halls are of low spec. and have been costed accordingly so a quality reduction is unlikely to be appropriate for tennis halls). The mean should apply to centres built entirely of brick and centres clad with a reasonable amount of fenestration. The Littledown Centre is being put forward as an illustration of a Centre with a high level of fenestration. The Sovereign Centre and the Goldsmith Centre being the mean and the Southglades Centre is below the average. The photographs in appendix 3 illustrate the differences in appearance of these Centres. It will be up to local negotiations to agree where the Centre in question falls. Where external swimming pools form part of the complex then the water area should be valued at £455/m2. Where Ice Rinks need to be valued as part of a complex then the ice area shall be treated as if it was a leisure pool. 6. Air Supported tennis hall of polyester fabric should be included at a cost of £50000 per court, over and above the cost of the playing surface, and lighting. Polythene covers have a very short life and can be treated as de minimis. In accordance with sports council guidance two extra changing spaces should be provided for each outdoor court (including those in air supported structures) 7. Select location factor from table 2. 8. External works should be valued on the basis on table 3 having regard to the site characteristics of the actual Centre. Therefore type 1 covers town centre sites with nominal perimeter space. Type 2 and 3 Centres will have significant landscaping, but type 2 is for Centres without parking and type 3 is for Centres with parking. The percentage addition covers the cost normal parking, landscaping, and services. Any other features should be separately valued. 9. Add 10% to all costs for professional fees and other charges. 10. Select age allowance from table 4 based upon whether wet or dry side and the age when the facility was opened. Where a Centre has been substantially refurbished, it will be necessary to consider the appropriate age to adopt for the purposes of any Age and Obsolescence Allowance to be applied at Stage 2 of the valuation this will be a matter of valuer judgement, but it should be borne in mind that it is unlikely that major parts of the structure will have been renewed. As such the appropriate date will always be between the date of construction but someway prior to the date of refurbishment, as this would reflect the age and obsolescence of a whole centre being built as at that latter date. No age allowance should be applied to site value, except in those instances in London where a site value of more than £30,000 per hectare has been adopted. 11. Calculate the notional substitute land area by taking the area of building, total of all 'A' type facilities and 50% of all the 'B' type facilities adding 5% for external walls. Allow for car parking - 1.03 spaces per 10m2 of net floor area x 25m2. Add for external facilities as per area in use. Together with a 15% addition for landscaping. Apply to total area the selected land value from Table 5. In London, in those instances where a land value of more than £30,000 per hectare is adopted, it should be applied to the actual site area of the hereditament, but ignoring any superfluous site area. 12. Apply to decapitalised sum any stage 5 adjustment for the excess running costs of the centre based upon the difference in the actual area of the centre and achieved saving in areas of the simple substitute building. Apply % reduction as per Table 6. For the avoidance of doubt the GIA of any buildings at the hereditament which are not included in the table one area should not be included in the calculation of this end allowance. For example a leisure centre with wet and dry facilities has an area of 3500, plus there is an athletics track with a grandstand of 400m2 and a grounds mans store of 50m2. The calculation shows the GIA of the leisure centre alone could be replaced by a centre of 3000 m2. The allowance for excess size should be based on the area of 3000m2 compared with the actual area of 3500m2. It should not be based on 3000m2 compared with (3500+400+50)=3950m2 13. Flat Roof Allowance: where the construction or design of the roof structure is not typical for the age or type of building and thereby creates an exceptional year on year repair liability over and above what could reasonably be expected, consideration should be given to making an allowance at stage 5. 14. Other Stage 5 adjustments: * Valuers to use own judgement over additional adjustment. * Fragmentation or several buildings. * Defects in the building i.e. pool tiling and halls which cannot accept all sports. * Inadequate parking. 1. Other Elements within the hereditament Other Items should be added according to information within the 2005 cost guide, or if there is not such information available further advice should be taken. For example costings for athletics tracks should be taken from the cost guide. (They should not be taken at an equivalent area of astro turf since the costs are significantly different). Care should be taken to ensure that the allowance at 16 above is not distorted by areas of additional items into the GIA – see note at 16 above Table 1 - Schedule of Facilities - Agreed Area for Each Activity
Element Area in m2 Rate Build Type Comments
1 Court hall 212.1 L A Hall selected on the basis of number of badminton courts in current use, exceptions being small halls where they would be replaced at their current size, or halls used primarily for other sports or non sports activities requiring a larger hall to a different standard.
2 Court hall 383.9 L A Hall selected on the basis of number of badminton courts in current use, exceptions being small halls where they would be replaced at their current size, or halls used primarily for other sports or non sports activities requiring a larger hall to a different standard.
3 Court hall 621.4 L A 621.4
4 Court hall 767.8 L A 767.8
5 Court hall 960.1 L A 960.1
6 Court hall 1,151.7 L A 1,151.7
7 Court hall 1344.0 L A 1344.0
8 Court hall 1,572.7 L A 1,572.7
9 Court hall 1,773.0 L A 1,773.0
10 Court hall 1894.5 L A 1894.5
11 Court hall 2,303.3 L A 2,303.3
12 Court hall 212.1 L A Hall selected on the basis of number of badminton courts in current use, exceptions being small halls where they would be replaced at their current size, or halls used primarily for other sports or non-sports activities requiring a larger hall to a different standard.
1 Lane Bowls Hall 209.1 L A In addition an extra allowance should be made for dry changing if necessary at 3.11m2/space.
2 Lane Bowls Hall 395.2 L A
3 Lane Bowls Hall 581.3 L A
4 Lane Bowls Hall 767.4 L A
5 Lane Bowls Hall 953.4 L A
6 Lane Bowls Hall 1,139.5 L A
7 Lane Bowls Hall 1,325.6 L A
8 Lane Bowls Hall 1,511.7 L A
9 Lane Bowls Hall 1,697.7 L A
10 Lane Bowls Hall 1,883.8 L A
11 Lane Bowls Hall 2,256.0 L A
12 Lane Bowls Hall 209.1 L A
1 Court Tennis Hall 692.3 T A Select on the basis of the number of tennis courts
2 Court Tennis Hall 1273.0 T A
3 Court Tennis Hall 1853.7 T A
4 Court Tennis Hall 2434.4 T A
5 Court Tennis Hall 3015.2 T A
6 Court Tennis Hall 3595.9 T A
7 Court Tennis Hall 4176.6 T A
8 Court Tennis Hall 4757.4 T A
9 Court Tennis Hall 5338.1 T A
10 Court Tennis Hall 5918.9 T A
Abnormal Hall L A Take hall area + 12½% for storage + 3.11m2 per changing space. Number of spaces to reflect the primary use of hall.
Dry viewing when not bar lounge L B 0.6m2 per space.
Fitness gym L B Quantity of stations x 5m2 x 1.622.
Multi use room L B Area in use + 3.11m2 per changing space necessary for primary use (ideally 1 per 5m2).
Squash court L A 73m2 per Court.
External change L B 2.35m2 per Space.
25 x 9 Swimming pool 737.9 H A Standard pool for most circumstances is 25 x 13, smaller pools chosen to match existing, larger pools where existing demand requires.
25 x 13 Swimming pool 955.5 H A
25 x 17 Swimming pool 1,173.1 H A
50 x 17 Swimming pool 2,194.4 H A
13 x 7½ Swimming pool 270.8 H A Learner pool selected on the basis of the width of the main pool, unless it is less than 13m then 13m should be used.
17 x 7½ Swimming pool 343.0 H A
Abnormal swimming pool H A Take water area x 1.945 and surround area x 1.15 +110.4m2 for first aid, store and group change.
Leisure pool H A Measure existing water area x 1.83 and surround area x 1.15 add 10 -15m2 for pools without other main swimming pools.
Diving pool 320.6 H A Area required for a 3m high board and 2 springboards.
Pool side viewing H B 0.69m2 per space.
Sauna/sun beds etc H B Based on existing use but adjusted for area replaced with modern equipment.
Café with food prep/ warm up L B As existing but adjusted for superfluity, as a guide 75m2 + 1.9m2 per cover (seat).
Vending area if no Café L B As existing but adjusted for superfluity, as a guide 1m2 per machine together with 1.9m2 per cover (seat) if space provided outside of main circulation for seating.
Bar lounge/dry viewing L B Based on existing but adjusted for area in use.
Retail shop L B Based on existing but adjusted for utilisation.
Other L/H B Area and rate subject to existing use.
Public toilets, reception, administration, staff areas and circulation L/H B 9% of total area calculated above.
Note all areas are inclusive of plant, changing rooms and store. Table 2 - Location Factor Index
Region County Location Factor
North Cleveland 0.91
Cumbria 0.95
Durham 0.91
Humberside 0.90
Northumberland 0.94
North Yorkshire 0.91
South Yorkshire 0.90
Tyne & Wear 0.91
West Yorkshire 0.88
East Bedfordshire 1.08
Cambridgeshire 1.04
Derbyshire 0.93
Essex 1.08
Hertfordshire 1.13
Leicestershire 0.93
Lincolnshire 0.93
Norfolk 0.97
Northamptonshire 0.98
Nottinghamshire 0.92
Suffolk 1.01
Central Cheshire 0.94
Greater Manchester 0.95
Hereford & Worcester 0.95
Lancashire 0.95
Merseyside 0.96
Shropshire 0.94
Staffordshire 0.93
Warwickshire 0.98
West Midlands 0.96
Wales and West Avon 0.96
Clwyd 0.90
Cornwall 0.93
Devon 0.94
Dorset 0.97
Dyfed 0.95
Gloucestershire 0.96
Gwent 0.95
Gwynedd 0.91
Mid Glamorgan 0.95
Powys 0.92
Somerset 0.94
South Glamorgan 0.96
West Glamorgan 0.93
South Berkshire 1.10
Buckinghamshire 1.09
East Sussex 1.12
Hampshire 1.06
Isle of Wight 1.07
Kent 1.12
Oxfordshire 1.05
Surrey 1.16
West Sussex 1.10
Wiltshire 0.96
London Inner London Boroughs
Camden 1.32
City of London 1.26
City of Westminster 1.30
Greenwich 1.20
Hackney 1.27
Hammersmith & Fulham 1.27
Islington 1.24
Kensington & Chelsea 1.35
Lambeth 1.26
Lewisham 1.17
Southwark 1.30
Tower Hamlets 1.23
Wandsworth 1.25
Outer London Boroughs
Barking & Dagenham 1.13
Barnet 1.19
Bexley 1.20
Brent 1.21
Bromley 1.16
Croydon 1.20
Ealing 1.20
Enfield 1.14
Haringey 1.22
Harrow 1.16
Havering 1.07
Hillingdon 1.15
Hounslow 1.15
Kingston Upon Thames 1.24
Merton 1.21
Newham 1.13
Richmond Upon Thames 1.20
Redbridge 1.12
Sutton 1.16
Waltham Forest 1.19
Table 3 - External Works
Characteristics of existing Centre Wet only Dry only Wet and Dry
Type 1: Town centre location with nominal space around Centre 1.00% 2.50% 1.75%
Type 2: Centre with landscaping but no parking 2.50% 4.50% 3.50%
Type 3: Centre with Parking 7.50% 10.00% 8.75%
Schedule of External Features
Flumes over main pools (not leisure pools) £1,495 per m in length
Tennis court (hard) £12,000 per court + 600m2 of land + £11,500 if externally illuminated
Astroturf areas £50/m2
Lighting of Sports pitches £2,875 per column up to £12,000 per column for high mast lighting
Additional parking (extra over normal for other attractions) £875 per space + 25m2 of land
Grass pitch £19,600 per pitch + 7000m2 of land
An age allowance for external hard features should, if appropriate, be calculated at the basic rate and, other than for flumes, capped at 25%. Such an allowance may be appropriate in respect of tennis courts, Tarmacadam, crushed stone or Redgra surfaces although judgements must be made having regard to their condition. Such a facility in an ‘as new’ condition may not merit an allowance irrespective of age. Table 4 - Age Allowance
Date of Construction Basic Age & Obsolescence Dry Side Differential Dry Side Allowance Basic Age & Obsolescence Wet Side Differential Wet Side Allowance
2005 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
2004 0.5% 0.0% 0.5% 0.5% 0.0% 0.5%
2003 1.0% 0.0% 1.0% 1.0% 0.0% 1.0%
2002 1.5% 0.0% 1.5% 1.5% 0.0% 1.5%
2001 2.0% 0.0% 2.0% 2.0% 0.0% 2.0%
2000 2.5% 0.0% 2.5% 2.5% 0.0% 2.5%
1999 3.0% 0.0% 3.0% 3.0% 0.0% 3.0%
1998 3.5% 0.0% 3.5% 3.5% 0.0% 3.5%
1997 4.0% 0.0% 4.0% 4.0% 0.0% 4.0%
1996 4.5% 0.0% 4.5% 4.5% 0.0% 4.5%
1995 5.0% 0.0% 5.0% 5.0% 0.0% 5.0%
1994 6.0% 0.0% 6.0% 6.0% 0.0% 6.0%
1993 7.0% 0.0% 7.0% 7.0% 0.0% 7.0%
1992 8.0% 0.0% 8.0% 8.0% 0.0% 8.0%
1991 9.0% 0.0% 9.0% 9.0% 0.0% 9.0%
1990 10.0% 0.0% 10.0% 10.0% 0.0% 10.0%
1989 11.0% 1.0% 12.0% 11.0% 1.0% 12.0%
1988 12.0% 2.0% 14.0% 12.0% 2.0% 14.0%
1987 13.0% 3.0% 16.0% 13.0% 3.0% 16.0%
1986 14.0% 4.0% 18.0% 14.0% 4.0% 18.0%
1985 15.0% 5.0% 20.0% 15.0% 5.0% 20.0%
1984 16.0% 6.0% 22.0% 16.0% 6.0% 22.0%
1983 17.0% 7.0% 24.0% 17.0% 7.0% 24.0%
1982 18.0% 8.0% 26.0% 18.0% 8.0% 26.0%
1981 19.0% 9.0% 28.0% 19.0% 9.0% 28.0%
1980 20.0% 10.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 30.0%
1979 21.0% 11.0% 32.0% 21.0% 11.5% 32.5%
1978 22.0% 12.0% 34.0% 22.0% 13.0% 35.0%
1977 23.0% 13.0% 36.0% 23.0% 14.5% 37.5%
1976 24.0% 14.0% 38.0% 24.0% 16% 40.0%
1975 25.0% 15.0% 40.0% 25.0% 17.5% 42.5%
1974 26.0% 16.0% 42.0% 26.0% 19.0% 45.0%
1973 27.0% 17.0% 44.0% 27.0% 20.5% 47.5%
1972 28.0% 18.0% 46.0% 28.0% 22.0% 50.0%
1971 29.0% 19.0% 48.0% 29.0% 23.5% 52.5%
1970 30.0% 20.0% 50.0% 30.0% 25.0% 55.0%
1969 Over 50% by Agreement. 31.0% 25.5% 56.5%
1968 32.0% 26.0% 58.0%
1967 33.0% 26.5% 59.5%
1966 34.0% 27.0% 61.0%
1965 35.0% 27.5% 62.5%
1964 36.0% 28.0% 64.0%
1963 37.0% 28.5% 65.5%
1962 38.0% 29.0% 67.0%
1961 39.0% 29.5% 68.5%
1960 & Before 40.0% 30.0% 70%

Table 5 - Land Values

Greater London area zone 1 (postal districts EC, WC, W1, W2, W11, W8, SW1, SW3, SW5, SW7 and SW10) £1,000,000 per hectare
Greater London area zone 2 (Greater London excluding zones 1 and 3) £110,000 per hectare
Greater London area zone 3 (within 4 miles of GLA boundary) £40,000* per hectare. Area to be calculated based upon simple substitute site
Inner M25 ring, Surrey, Berks and Herts £30,000* per hectare
Remainder of South East £20,000* per hectare
Remainder of Country £10,000* per hectare
*Values to be used unless transaction evidence within 2 miles of the existing centre indicates a different level. **Within Greater London, the zone 3 price also applies to hereditaments located on land previously public open space within zones 1 or 2. Within Greater London zone 2, the zone 3 price also applies to zone 2 hereditaments which might, without detriment to the communities which they serve, be located within zone 3, or where there is a reasonable expectation that existing public open space might be available for leisure Centre development. Similarly the zone 2 price applies to zone 1 hereditaments which might, without detriment to the communities which they serve, be located within zone 2.

Table 6 - Excess running costs

eduction factor = (E-S)/E% Where E = Existing building area and S = Simple substitute building area, see paragraph 16
Reduction factor Adjust valuation by
1% 0.25%
2% 0.50%
3% 0.75%
4% 1.00%
5% 1.25%
6% 1.50%
7% 1.75%
8% 2.00%
9% 2.25%
10% 2.50%
11% 2.75%
12% 3.00%
13% 3.25%
14% 3.50%
15% 3.75%
16% 4.00%
17% 4.25%
18% 4.50%
19% 4.75%
20% 5.00%
21% 5.25%
22% 5.50%
23% 5.75%
24% 6.00%
25% 6.25%
26% 6.50%
27% 6.75%
28% 7.00%
29% 7.25%
30% 7.50%