Rating Manual section 6 part 3: valuation of all property classes

Section 475: village halls, church halls, scout huts, etc and community centres

This publication is intended for Valuation Officers. It may contain links to internal resources that are not available through this version.

1. Charitable village halls/scout huts etc.

1.1 Co-ordination

Charitable Village Halls are subject to the Co-ordination arrangements set out in the relevant Practice Note.

1.2 General

This paragraph concerns halls or community centres run by local charitable trusts as opposed to other halls which may be occupied by parish councils or are church halls.

These halls are run by village hall management committees for a charitable trust set up for the hall. Such halls were and are often erected following public subscription, benefaction or grants.

Halls vary considerably in size as well as quality and modernity.

Management committees are generally made up of user group representatives and elected members. The trust deed will have been approved by the Charity Commissioners and sets out the way in which the hall may be used and run. Income will be from the user groups (eg playgroups, senior citizens clubs, youth organisations, etc) and from single events such as wedding receptions. Charities are not, however, permitted to undertake trading activities.

Discretionary relief from rates for charitable occupations of 80% will be available and the billing authority may at its discretion increase this to 100%.

1.3 Survey Requirements

The basis of measurement for this class is Gross Internal Area (GIA). Reference should be made to the VO Code of Measuring Practice for Rating Purposes in England and Wales.

1.4 Basis of Valuation

Regard should be had to the actual occupier as a potential and in many cases most likely tenant and consideration given to the rent which would be agreed if the trust were not in occupation and a landlord had the property vacant and to let and was inviting bids.

1.5 Valuation Considerations

Factors to take into account include:-

a. the location, including rurality, and nature of the hall

b. the construction, size, maintenance liability and facilities provided

c. the population served

d. possible alternative uses within the confines of rebus sic stantibus

e. other possible tenants, eg the parish council or an independent club

f. the ability to pay of likely tenants

g. rental evidence.

It may be appropriate to have regard to the contractor’s basis, particularly where a hall has recently been constructed, as giving some indication of rental value. Care must be exercised following the maxim that “cost does not necessarily equal value”.

2. Church Halls

Church Clubs forming part of Church Halls, Chapel Halls or similar buildings are exempt if the conditions of para 11 of Schedule 5 LGFA 1988 are fulfilled. These specify that the hall must be used in connection with a place of public religious worship, (which either belongs to the Church of England or the Church of Wales, or has been certified by law as a place of religious worship), and for the purposes of the organisation responsible for the conduct of public religious worship in that place. These provisions are dealt with more fully in RM 4:8.9.

3. Community Halls and Centres

Many Community Centres provided by local authorities are conducted on similar lines to members’ clubs and when considering who is in rateable occupation of this class of hereditament Valuation Officers should determine who is in paramount control of the use of the premises.

If the local authority can be shown to be in paramount control and, consequently, in rateable occupation, the assessment should be determined in the absence of reliable rental evidence by reference to the contractor’s basis method.

The Lands Tribunal decision in Addington Community Association v Croydon Borough Council and Gudgion (VO): LT 1967 RA 96 considered the ability to pay principle following the decision in Tomlinson (VO) v Plymouth Argyle Football Co Ltd (CA 1960: 53 R&IT 297) and may be cited where it is contended that the cost of the buildings considerably exceeds what is really necessary. This case was however decided on its own facts and the valuer should adopt a prima facie assumption that a community centre constructed for a local authority meets the needs of that authority and that its adjusted cost is indicative of value.

Where it is considered that a Community Centre is conducted as a members’ club and that the club is in rateable occupation, the assessment should be determined in accordance with the principles set out in RM5:260 although the presence of the local authority as a potential bidder should not be disregarded.

Practice note 1: R2017: Village Halls Church Halls Scout / Guides / Cadet Huts and Community Centres

1.Market Appraisal

This property class encompasses a number of property types including traditional village halls, purpose built community centres and smaller huts used by the scouts and army air and sea cadets. The organisations that typically occupy this class of property are largely dependent on grants and loans from local or central government or are required to self -fund through local initiatives.

The sector contains a number of charitable occupiers. In a recent report the Charity Commission noted that there are over 9000 village halls and community centres occupied by bodies recognised as charities in England and Wales representing more than 5% of the Charities Register and having a combined annual income of £0.25 billion.

Financial constraints in recent years have impacted on some community groups occupying property in this class. This is particularly prevalent in rural areas where demographic changes have left halls serving an increasingly elderly population.

The Charities Commission urges community hall operators to be more dynamic in their outlook and search to provide relevant activities to attract the local population. The need to deal with social problems in their areas has meant that some community halls have adapted and broadened their services to be seen as providing a community hub. The Charities Commission notes that where occupiers have shown a desire to develop their functions, they have been rewarded with greater financial resources.

A further issue in the provision of community buildings is the need to comply with recent new legislation to provide access for all. The provision of disabled facilities can be difficult and costly particularly in older buildings and there is a need to maintain higher rates of public liability insurance to cover accidents that may occur. In the light of these operational difficulties some Community halls have been closed or put to other uses.

The 1990s / early 2000s saw a steady decline in Scout Membership but a revamp of the organisation has seen an uptake in new members. In 2009 the Scout Association reported its biggest increase in membership since 1972 with 16,568 new adult and youth members joining. Following the fifth consecutive year of growth, the Scout Association reports that it is now the largest co-educational youth movement in the country. However funding for renovation of existing property stock and renewals has not kept pace with this growth in membership.

2.Changes From The Last Practice Note

There is little change from the last practice note, but see comments below regarding rental levels.

3.Ratepayer Discussions

No discussions have taken place with any representative body or their agents

4.Valuation Scheme

4.1 Valuation on the Rentals method

Where there is reliable rental evidence, the appropriate rate per m2 should be applied to the Net Internal Area of the property.

Available rental evidence suggests values for community centres range from £20 /m2 in rural locations to £100 /m2 in London. However valuation schemes should be formed upon the evidence available in the locality under consideration in every case.

4.2 Valuation using the Contractors Basis

The costs shown in this section are for ease of reference. In all cases where a cost guide code is shown that must be input into the NBS template, not the costs shown here. Where the cost guide code shows options, the costs shown in this practice note should be used to aid selection. Should the cost guide show differing costs to those shown in a current version of this practice note, please refer to the CCT.

The Gross Internal Area should be used for properties valued on the contractor’s basis.

A) Stage 1 - Estimated Replacement Cost

Building cost

It has been asumed that Village halls, Church Halls and Community Centres are of a different nature and quality to that of Scout, Guide and Cadet Huts. Regard should be had to the Cost Guide beacons and if in the particular instance this is not the case it may be appropriate to adopt the scout Hut or Comunity Centre beacon.

The GIA should be used to calculate the Estimated Replacement Cost (Stage 1) of the building by applying a substitute building cost as specified in the cost guide under the following references

Cost Guide Code Generic Specific Description Size ERC
61FOOA Community Centres Medium--Beacon One Basic Quality 350m2-1000m2 £1,500
61FOOF Community Centres Small Beacon One Medium Quality Less than or equal to 350 m2 £1,701
61FOOK Community Centres Small Beacon Two Medium Quality Less than 350m2 £1238
61FOOP Community Centres Medium--Beacon 2 Basic Quality 350m2-1000m2 £1780

Scout and cadet huts etc. should be valued using the appropriate cost provided in the cost guide under Cost Guide reference 61F00V, £744 / m2

External works : Community Centres Village Halls, Church Halls

Addition       Description
2% Town centre or island site typically with 90% or greater building ratio, no more than a small yard or garden area, and either no car parking, or a very limited number of spaces within the hereditament.
2.5% As above, but typically with an 80% to 90% building ratio, limited parking, external lighting and landscaping and some boundary fencing.
5% Site typically with 50%/75% building ratio, some landscaping around buildings, secure boundary fencing, adequate parking, external lighting and landscaping with limited general parking within the hereditament and boundary fencing.
7.5% As above, but typically with 25%/50% building ratio, landscaping around buildings, secure boundary fencing, external lighting, adequate parking within the hereditament which falls short of full requirements,.
12.5% Site typically with about 25% building ratio, landscaping around buildings, secure boundary fencing, external lighting and adequate parking within the hereditament for all staff and other users.

External works : Scout and Cadet Huts

3.5% Town centre or island site typically with a 90% or greater building ratio, no more than a small yard or garden area, and either no car parking, or a very limited number of spaces within the hereditament.
7.5% As above, but typically with an 80% to 90% building ratio, limited parking, external lighting and landscaping and some boundary fencing.
10% Site typically with 50%/75% building ratio, some landscaping around buildings, secure boundary fencing, adequate parking, external lighting and landscaping with limited general parking within the hereditament and boundary fencing.
12.5% As above, but typically with 25%/50% building ratio, landscaping around buildings, secure boundary fencing, external lighting, adequate parking within the hereditament which falls short of full requirements,.
17.5%                                  Site typically with about 25% building ratio, landscaping around buildings, secure boundary fencing, external lighting and adequate parking within the hereditament for all staff and other users.

Contract size adjustments should be made in accordance with standard scales in the 2017 Cost Guide.

Location Factors are to be applied in accordance with the figures given in the 2017 Cost Guide

An addition for Fees should be made in accordance with the guidance in the 2017 Cost Guide

B) Stage 2 – Age and Obsolescence

Adjustments for age and obsolescence should be made in accordance with the scales contained in Rating Manual - section 4 part 3: the contractor’s basis of valuation : R2017 practice note: Stage 2 - Age and Obsolescence Allowances, and should be applied in most circumstances.

C) Stage 3 – Land value

Land value should be arrived at by having regard to amenity land values in the area (see 2017 practice note relating to land values) , in accordance with Rating Manual section. 4: Section 7.

D) Stage 4 – Decapitalisation Rate

The Adjusted Replacement Cost (ARC) of the hereditament shall be de-capitalised to an annual equivalent by taking the prescribed (higher) rate.

E) Stage 5 – End Adjustments

Any advantage or disadvantage, which might affect the value of the occupation of the hereditament as a whole, should be reflected at this stage. An adjustment under this head should not duplicate adjustments made elsewhere.

4.3 . IT Support

4.3.1 Where the Contractors Basis is appropriate the other generic Contractors Valuation Spreadsheet held on the non- Bulk Server should be used for all valuations .

4.3.2 Where the rentals method of valuation is employed, records should be captured and valuations carried out by applying an appropriate scheme using the Rating Support Application (RSA)

Practice note 1: R2010: Village halls, church halls, scout/guide/cadet huts and community centres

1 Co-ordination Arrangements

For the purposes of the 2010 Reval the following arrangements apply:

R2005 Scat code (and suffix) Class Co -ordination responsibility
067(G) Community Day Centres Group
293(G) Village Halls/Scout/Guide/Cadet Huts etc Group
225(S) Public Halls SRU

These arrangements are a continuation of those used for the 2005 and the 2000-rating list.

The dividing line between community/day centres, public halls, and concert halls is not always self-evident, however the Public Halls class should normally only include hereditaments used as Theatres/Concert Halls.

It is recommended that, where in local authority occupation, a community centre of superior specification adequate as a venue for professional entertainment, conferences or used as a theatre/concert hall and regularly (but not exclusively) so used, should be regarded as a public hall and either passed over to the responsibility of the SRU or, valued following co-ordination/consultation with the SRU.

Note that Cadet Huts also fall within this category, and they should accordingly be SCat coded under 293G, as opposed to 187 (MoD Hereditaments), 015 (Army Hereditaments), 197 (Navy Hereditaments) or 230 (RAF Hereditaments).

2. Cross reference

RM Section 6: Part 3: s1050 deals with Theatres and Concert Halls. Public halls used as theatres/concert halls may be valued in accordance with the relevant parts of that section and any associated Practice Note(s). The 2010 PN to RM Section 6: Part 3: s595 deals with public halls, which are part of Town Hall/Civic Centre hereditaments.

3. Measurement

The property will generally be valued on a rentals basis (see below) but groups have variously adopted different methods of measurement with about half NIA (Net Internal Area) and half GIA (Gross Internal Area). There will be no attempt to standardise this for R2010 and groups should continue to adopt their current bases, adopting NIA or GIA valuation scale as appropriate. Those properties that are exceptionally considered to best be valued by reference to the contractor’s basis should be measured to GIA (Gross Internal Area).

If it is unclear which basis of valuation (and thus of measurement) will be used, sufficient measurements to allow both areas to be calculated will be required.

4. Valuation

4.1:

In applying the guidance given within this section, VOs should note that organisations which are often in occupation of this class of hereditament have strictly limited budgets and little flexibility to meet hypothetical rental obligations. In such cases it is necessary to consider the “ability to pay” of the actual occupier. This involves examination of the receipts and expenditure associated with occupation of the hereditament. The general presumption is that most of these properties will be valued on a rentals basis, using RSA and the Standard Valuation Scales provided. However, as recommended in the main RM section for this class, RM Section 6: Part 3: s475, the contractor’s basis should be adopted where the rateable occupier is identified as a local authority (excepting parish councils).

4.2:

A limited amount of rental evidence has been derived centrally for these properties. This evidence would suggest a range of values for these properties of between £20/m2 and £50/m2, depending on age, construction and location of the property. It is to be expected that scout/guide/cadet huts will tend towards the lower end of this range. Properties that are more in the nature of “quasi-office” premises (as can sometimes be found in more urban settings, containing numbers of rooms together with larger meeting rooms, as opposed to hereditaments consisting of a main hall with ancillary space) may attract values of up to 50% more than these figures. This basis (being derived from actual lettings) is expected to incorporate effects of “ability to pay”, and further reductions for such should not be given as a matter of course, but only in exceptional and fully investigated cases. In the absence of any local evidence to suggest otherwise, it is recommended that these value ranges be used for R2010. Regard should also be had to the levels of value adopted for similar style properties in the same locale – for example, sports clubhouses and pavilions (see RM Section 6: Part 3: s970 and associated entries). There may also be a need to consider whether properties in this class actually operate as a “Member’s Club”, in which case reference should be had to the relevant Rating Manual entry (RM Section 6: Part 3: s260).

4.3:

Although “ability to pay” may fix the value, it may be necessary to consider a contractor’s basis valuation. It should be noted that in recent years a large number of new premises have been constructed with grant aid. Reference should be made to RM section 4 part 3 for the extent to which grant aid should be reflected in valuation.

Those properties that are valued using the Contractor’s basis should be valued using the Non-Bulk Server generic Spreadsheet. Contractor’s basis valuations may produce higher values (expressed in £/m2) for this class of property, and the “ability to pay” issue might therefore apply more heavily in such cases. Where the Contractor’s Basis is applied, reference should be made to the 2010 Cost Guide, where beacons for community centres are provided and guidance on fee levels and contract size allowance is available; for costs of external works reference should be made to RM v4 s7 PN 2 2010, and for land value RM v4 s7 PN 1 2010.

5. Exemptions

Church halls and similar buildings used in connection with a place of public religious worship are potentially exempt. See RM section 6 part 6 for full details.

Practice Note 1 : 2005 : Village Halls, Church Halls, Scout Huts etc & Community Centres

1. Co-ordination Arrangements

For the purposes of the 2005 Reval the following arrangements apply:

R2000 Scat code (and suffix) Class Co -ordination responsibility
067(G) Community/Day Centres Group
293(G) Village Halls/Scout Huts etc Group
225(S) Public Halls SRU

These arrangements are also applicable to maintenance of the 2000 rating list.

The dividing line between community/day centres, public halls, and concert halls is not always self-evident, however the Public Halls class should normally only include hereditaments used as Theatres/Concert Halls.

It is recommended that, where in local authority occupation, a community centre of superior specification adequate as a venue for professional entertainment or conferences and regularly (but not exclusively) so used, should be regarded as a public hall used as a theatre/concert hall and either passed over to the responsibility of the SRU or, valued following co-ordination/consultation with the SRU.

2. Cross reference

RM v5:s1050 deals with Theatres and Concert Halls. Public halls used as theatres/concert halls may be valued in accordance with the relevant parts of that section and any associated Practice Note(s).

3. Valuation

3.1:

In applying the guidance given within this section, VOs should note that organisations which are often in occupation of this class of hereditament have strictly limited budgets and little flexibility to meet hypothetical rental obligations. In such cases it is necessary to consider the “ability to pay” of the actual occupier. This involves examination of the receipts and expenditure associated with occupation of the hereditament.

3.2:

Although “ability to pay” may fix the value, it may be necessary to consider a contractor’s basis valuation. It should be noted that in recent years a large number of new premises have been constructed with grant aid. Reference should be made to Rating Manual: section 4 part 3 - appendix 2 for the extent to which grant aid should be reflected in valuation. Appendix 1 to this Practice Note contains a list of Millennium Funded projects which fall within this class, together with the cost and the amount of grant aid.

Practice Note 1 : 2005 : Appendix A : Schedule of Millennium Funded Community Centres and Village Halls

The following projects were among those listed as having been offered grant aid by the Millennium Coimmission in 1998. In each case the first sum quoted is the maximum grant, and the second sum is the total project cost. Some of these projects may not have been completed. It should be noted that the costs may include some non-rateable features.

Wales

Llanbedr Community Hall

A new community hall in the rural village of Llanbedr, nr Brecon. The hall will cater for a variety of activities, and include a large multi-purpose hall, a meeting room, a computer room and an exhibition area.

£181,415

£362,830

Church Community Hall, Sully, South Wales

This project will provide a much needed community facility for residents in a semi-rural community, consisting of a well-equipped, permanent new building.

£146,500

£310,000

Lawrenny Village Hall and Youth Hostel

A community project to regenerate the isolated community of Lawrenny with a refurbished and upgraded village hall and youth hostel dormitory accommodation.

£131,170

£296,789

North

The Courtyard Community Project, Goole

Boothferry Road Community Project - flagship project to create a community centre through the renovation of a former Victorian School.

£462,000

£1,051,405

St Aidan’s Church And Community Centre, Sheffield

An existing Parish church together with a single storey extension will be developed to form a community centre that will be appropriate for the needs of the local disadvantaged community.

£409,500

£819,000

Grassington Millennium Project, Yorkshire

To extend and upgrade the existing town hall known as the Devonshire Institute. The extension will create a multi-purpose area at the rear of the building that will be used for social functions, lectures, conferences or as exhibition space. The works also include the upgrading of the existing facilities.

£313,750

£627,500

St Augustine’s Church Hall, Kirkby In Cleveland

An existing timber and corrugated iron structure which was built as a church hall in 1923. The new community hall will incorporate features such as stained glass panels, wrought ironwork and decorative stonework.

£224,168

£448,335

Helperby Village Hall, Helperby

A project to build a new village hall of innovative design to replace the existing 1914 structure. The previous hall was originally converted from a feed mill and donated by the local estate in 1971. The new hall will act as a focus for the area’s activities in the 21st Century. It aims to respond to the change in the age and leisure expectations of the population and will provide opportunities for sports, arts, information technology and training

£181,885

£363,770

Kettesling Millennium Village Hall, Felliscliffe

A new village hall to replace a temporary structure built in 1920. The hall will be in style of a dales barn designed to be sympathetic to the surrounding village and countryside. The new community facility aims to provide local, social, cultural and sporting activities.

£150,000

£300,000

North West

Vauxhall Community Centre, Liverpool

To rebuild and extend a community centre to provide a new building of high architectural quality and environmental improvements in a deprived area. This well used centre currently provides education, community and social facilities in a sub standard building and the new construction will benefit a local population of around 9,000 people.

£1,721,195

£3,442,391

The South Meadow Lane Centre, Preston

For the construction of a new, larger, all purpose facility to accommodate an increased programme of social, cultural and educational activities and welfare support facilities. The existing centre is already a focal point for the Central Lancashire Hindu community. It provides an important bridge between ethnic minority communities and other local people. The project enjoys widespread support and caters for a wide range of visitors.

£1,640,000

£3,350,000

The Youth Powerhouse, Moss Side

A new Powerhouse for the young people of Moss Side which celebrates their diversity and embraces their needs, interests and aspirations. An existing small Youth Centre will be replaced by a new flagship building. Education and training opportunities, pathways to employment and youth enterprise schemes will be available.

£1,405,400

£2,810,800

New Era, Accrington

A “one-stop shop” for community, leisure and education. The project will benefit both the indigenous and ethnic population of Accrington. A 1920s two storey World War II dance hall, currently a youth centre, will be redeveloped to comprise halls to cater for a range of events.

£1,381,829

£2,763,658

Belle Vale On Line Community Centre, Liverpool

The centre will enable the local communities to develop their skills and talents. It will be a centre for cultural, recreational, technological and learing excellence, providing access to IT facilities and training. The centre will consist of a main hall, a computer and communications suite, a community support suite, cafe bar and launderette.

£733,250

£1,686,250

East Midlands

King’s Sutton Community Centre, Northamptonshire

A new community centre incorporating a health centre and new Memorial Hall. The hall will provide a home for modern sport, recreation and education facilities for all age groups, including a youth club, advice centre and elderly luncheon club.

£550,725

£1,101,450

St.Martha’s community project

This project, in Nottingham, will provide a new community building and meeting hall, child care facilities, and vocational training facilities in an area with over 43% youth unemployment.

£243,600

£630,600

Hulland Village Hall, Derbyshire

To replace and relocate the existing village hall from a restricted site with limited parking to a larger site. The scheme will also incorporate an area of mixed species woodland planting to enhance the hall’s location and environment.

£146,325

£292,650

West Midlands

MOBCC Community Centre, Staffordshire

To replace an obsolete and dilapidated village hall with a modern multi-purpose community centre to serve three Staffordshire villages. The new facility will cater for the needs of a wide variety of user groups and individuals.

£220,775

£441,550

Cockshutt Millennium Hall, Shropshire

To build and equip a much needed facility to replace an existing dilapidated wooden structure. It will be energy efficient, enjoys local support and will be used by young and elderly local groups.

£162,500

£325,000

East Anglia

Red Lodge Community Centre, Bury St. Edmunds

A working demonstration of an energy efficient community which will provide a multitude of community facilities and serve as an outpost for education courses.

£565,500

£1,130,000

Over Community Centre, Cambridgeshire

A community centre which will provide a venue for over 50 local clubs and societies. the centre itself will consist of a multi-purpose hall capable of seating 160 people.

£337,536

£891,772

Buckden Village Community Centre, Cambridgeshire

Renovation and extension of an existing community centre to include a community room, youth club and activity room, information centre, playgroup room, theatre workshop and family area.

£320,500

£641,000

1st Lawford Scout Group Headquarters & Community Centre, Manningtree, Essex

For a new scouting headquarters and community centre. The main hall, meeting rooms and areas for after school activities will be provided for this expanding scout group and up to 10,000 people in the surrounding areas.

£270,000

£540,000

Great Baddow Community Centre, Essex

To part replace and enlarge an existing community centre in a large suburban parish which will be able to utilise a larger community hall due to increasing demand from user groups.

£233,825

£467,650

Whittlesford Memorial Hall - Project 2000

To replace the Memorial Hall extension at Whittlesford Cambridgeshire with a quality multi purpose building and to refurbish the original Hall.

£160,000

£320,000

South East

Egerton Village Hall, Kent

To provide a new hall similar in style to a Kentish barn. It will be constructed in local materials and is designed to blend in with the village, situated in a key location. This new and larger facility will be capable of staging dramatic events, and will include a ‘telecottage’, a doctor’s surgery, a small meeting room, a kitchen and a servery.

£329,800

£659,600

Cherwell Village Halls, Oxfordshire

A replacement for two village halls, one in the village of Shipton-upon-Cherwell, and the other in Horton-cum-Studley.

£269,000

£538,000

Scaynes Hill Village Centre, West Sussex

A new hall on the receational ground in the middle of the village to provide a community facility which will be used for a whole variety of purposes including playgroups, keep fit classes and badminton.

£253,700

£507,400

Elham Community Centre, Kent

To replace the existing 60 year old redundant village hall which will be demolished and replaced by a high quality, multi purpose community building.

£209,033

£418,066

Chilbolton Village Hall, Hampshire

A project to construct a new, purpose-built community facility in this Hampshire village. The new hall, the site and its environment will be a vast improvement, not only in size but in the quality and variation of the facilities provided. The design of the new hall will utilise the best practices in energy efficiency and low maintenance to ensure the long term viability of the scheme.

£205,500

£411,000

New Memorial Hall, Littleton, Hampshire

A new memorial hall based on the original hall built in memory of the local residents of Littleton and Harestock who lost their lives in the First World War. The new hall will act as a focus for a variety of recreational, educational and sporting activities for all age groups.

£194,000

£388,000

St Marks Millennium Community Centre, Godalming, Surrey

This project will refurbish and upgrade the existing community facilities and add a new specially designed structure which will house a youth studio, technology centre and community rooms.

£180,000

£385,000

Darby Green and Frogmore Social Hall, Hampshire

A new community hall built on the same site as the existing hall which is no longer adequate. The new hall will be used by the local community who already embrace activities such as playgroups, dancing classes, youth groups, indoor sports, martial arts and community events encompassing all age and social activities.

£174,378

£348,755

Lacey Green and Loseley Row Village Hall, Buckinghamshire

A village hall which will replace an ex-war timber hut acqured in 1923. The new hall will provide a larger main area, greater storage space, a meeting room and a kitchen.

£167,790

£335,580

Grayswood Village Hall

To replace the village hall with a new facility designed to high environmental standards and which will meet the growing demand for community facilities.

£150,000

£333,000

New Haw Community Centre, Surrey

A project to extend and upgrade New Haw community centre. The project will expand the existing facilities by at least 50% and provide a much needed space for the whole community. Accessibility to the centre will be improved so that all members of the community can easily use the facilities.

£155,000

£331,698

Upham Village Hall, Hampshire

A village hall to replace the existing 1914 structure which was originally converted from a feed mill and donated by the local estate in 1971. Sited at the project is also a restored 18th Century Dovecote which gives the centre a prominent focus.

£155,000

£310,000

Moulsoe Millennium Hall, Buckinghamshire

Moulsoe Community Association - a new village hall catering for a wide range of community activities, which will make a substantial contribution to the community.

**£126,000 **

£287,750

Cumnor Old School Community Centre

For the transformation of the Old School at Cumnor into a new community centre embracing the needs of local people.

£142,500

£285,000

Cliddesden Village Hall, Hampshire

A new village hall to replace the existing one built in 1923. The hall will be situated within easy access for all the community. The new site will enable on-site parking, allow associated uses with nearby St Leonard’s church and Cliddesden Primiary school, accommodate larger, previously unviable events and allow existing clubs and societies to expand.

£139,250

£278,500

Marsworth Village Hall, Hertfordshire

To replace a turn of the century village hall with a new hall constructed in ‘Rothschild’. Inside the new hall a Millennium tapestry created by the villagers will be displayed. The tapestry will show the familiar landmarks of the area and illustrate present day village life.

£119,840

£239,680

South West

Cornwall Composite Scheme.

An umbrella scheme to develop more than 35 parish based community driven initiatives. These may include village halls, wildlife sites and playing fields.

£2,000,000

£4,000,000

Twerton Village Hall, Bath

To convert, renovate and extend a disused and dilapidated Victorian building into a new village hall and community centre. The new facility will provide a large hall for up to 120 people, a smaller side room for up to 30 people, showers and changing rooms, kitchen facilities and a millennium garden for public use.

£206,050

£412,101

Next Generation, Kingsbridge, Devon

A centre of excellence for young people will be created by converting an old ambulance station into a young people’s community centre. The project is aimed predominantly at 11 - 25 year olds. In the afternoons and eveings the centre will be a place for school children to gather. A themed cyber cafe, quiet rooms for home work clubs as well as general youth amenities will provide a range of educational and entertainment facilities.

£167,514

£335,078