Official Statistics

Nature of burglary

The figures presented here are from the 2010 to 2011 British Crime Survey (BCS). Domestic burglary includes: burglary with entry - incidents…

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Nature of burglary (Microsoft Excel file - 310kb)

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Details

The figures presented here are from the 2010/11 British Crime Survey (BCS).

Domestic burglary includes:

  • burglary with entry - incidents in which the offender entered the dwelling as a trespasser with the intention of committing theft or criminal damage. The offender must have entered the property but need not have carried out his/her intention; and
  • attempted burglary - incidents in which there is clear evidence that the offender tried to enter the dwelling as a trespasser but failed.

Burglary does not necessarily entail the theft (or attempted theft) of property or involve forced entry (for example, it may be through an open window or involve the use of false pretences).  The BCS does not collect information about burglary of commercial premises. Other Home Office surveys have been undertaken to capture the extent and costs of crime to the retail and manufacturing sector.

Published 20 October 2011