Official Statistics

Accessibility statistics: 2011

This statistical release presents information on accessibility statistics for England for 2011.

Documents

Accessibility statistics 2011

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ACS0101

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Accessibility Statistics 2011, XLS and CSV formats, excluding tables at Lower Super Output Area level

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Accessibility Statistics 2011, tables at Lower Super Output Area level (ACS0501-ACS0508) in CSV format only

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Details

This statistical release presents information on accessibility statistics for England for 2011.

The accessibility statistics provide a local-level measure of the availability of transport to key services (covering food stores, education, health care, town centres and employment centres) for the populations who use them. They are widely used in accessibility planning by local authorities.

Changes in travel times and accessibility can be caused by three factors:

  • the number and location of service destinations;
  • the quality of the service destinations datasets;
  • and road / travel factors (such as public transport timetables, road layout and congestion).

In most the cases changes in the first two factors (i.e. relating to the number and location of destinations and data quality) will have a greater affect on average travel times than changes in timetables.

This release provides a summary of the statistics at national and regional level. The full set of results, including figures at Local Authority and Lower Super Output Area level, are available in separate files.

Key points

  • The average minimum travel time to the seven key services (excluding town centres) was 14 minutes by public transport/walking, 9 minutes by cycling and 6 minutes by car. These times were 0.55 minutes longer than in 2010 for public transport/walking and around 0.2 minutes longer than in 2010 for both cycling and by car.
  • Average of key services excluding town centres
  • As in previous years, hospitals had the longest average minimum travel times of the seven key services in 2011 with average minimum travel times of 30 minutes by public transport/walking, 21 minutes by cycling and 9 minutes by driving. Primary schools and foods stores were the most accessible services.
  • Users in urban areas could access key services by public transport/walking, on average, in 12 minutes compared with 22 minutes in rural areas.
  • The proportion of users able to access key services by public transport/walking in a ‘reasonable’ time was highest for employment centres (81%). The lowest was for hospitals (29%).
  • Overall access to key services by public transport/walking within a ‘reasonable’ time was greatest in London and lowest in the East of England.

Click here to view this data in an interactive chart

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Published 12 July 2012