Statistical data set

Commercial vehicle testing data for Great Britain

Statistical data sets about vehicle tests, including annual tests for lorries, buses and trailers, top failure reasons, and test sites.

About this data set

This data set comes from data held by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA).

It isn’t classed as an ‘official statistic’. This means it’s not subject to scrutiny and assessment by the UK Statistics Authority.

Annual tests for lorries, buses and trailers

The annual test for lorries, buses and trailers is similar to the MOT test that cars take each year.

Summary of annual tests for lorries, buses and trailers

The initial fail rate is the rate for vehicles as they were brought for the annual test. The final fail rate excludes vehicles that pass the test after rectification of minor defects at the time of the test.

The non-DVSA rows show tests done at designated premises and authorised testing facilities.

Summary of annual tests for lorries, buses and trailers

Top 10 reasons for vehicle fails

These data sets give the percentage of vehicles tested where the item was listed as a reason for failure.

Vehicles can fail for one or more items, so these percentages can’t be added to give a total fail rate for these items.

Top 10 reasons for heavy goods vehicle (HGV) vehicle fails

Top 10 reasons for heavy goods vehicle (HGV) trailer fails

Top 10 reasons for public service vehicle (PSV) fails

Vehicle initial test fail rate by age

There’s no trailer registration scheme, so the age of trailers tested has been estimated using each trailer’s ID number. These are allocated by DVSA when the owner or operator can’t give a precise date of manufacture.

The failure rates are based on this estimation.

Vehicle initial test fail rate by age

Vehicle initial test fail rate by fleet size

Vehicle initial test fail rate by fleet size

Voluntary tests

You can have a voluntary test of roadworthiness, or voluntary checks of certain parts of your HGV or PSV, eg a headlamp aim test.

These figures show the number of items tested. For brakes, this is the number of axles tested and not vehicles tested.

Voluntary tests

Annual test sites

The number of DVSA and non-DVSA sites where annual tests are carried out. Non-DVSA sites include:

  • designated premises (DPs)
  • authorised testing facilities (ATFs)

The calculation of non-DVSA sites changed in 2012/13, the previous years have been recalculated using this method.

Annual test sites

Specialist tests

As well as the annual test, your vehicle must be tested if you want to be able to use it for certain activities.

Certificate of Initial Fitness (COIF)

You need a COIF for your vehicle if it has more than 8 passenger seats, will be used for profit and either:

  • isn’t registered in the UK and was built before the type approval scheme was introduced
  • is registered in the UK but doesn’t have a type approval as a passenger vehicle with more than 8 passenger seats

Certificate of Initial Fitness (COIF)

ADR test for vehicles carrying dangerous or hazardous goods

The ADR is a specialist test for vehicles carrying dangerous or hazardous goods in bulk by road.

ADR test for vehicles carrying dangerous or hazardous goods

ATP scheme for carrying perishable foodstuffs

Many countries require you to comply with the agreement on the international carriage of perishable foodstuffs (ATP) if you carry perishable foodstuffs abroad in an insulated refrigerated vehicle or container.

ATP scheme for carrying perishable foodstuffs

TIR test

The TIR system allows UK customs officials to pack and seal goods before they are transported outside the EU. This means that the load won’t need to be opened and inspected by customs officials at border crossings.

TIR test

Reduced pollution certificates (RPC)

If you modify a vehicle to cut its emissions, you can get it tested by DVSA for an RPC. This reduces the cost of your vehicle tax and may mean that you can drive in London’s Low Emission Zone without charge.

Reduced pollution certificates (RPC)