Research and analysis

DNA retention policy: results of analysis relating to the protections of the Scottish model

This report draws on Police National Computer data to assess the offending risk of groups of individuals compared with the general population.

Documents

DNA retention policy: results of analysis relating to the protections of ‘the Scottish model’ summary (PDF file - 65kb)

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DNA retention policy: results of analysis relating to the protections of ‘the Scottish model’ report (PDF file - 167kb)

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Detail

Home Office Research Report 58 draws on data from the Police National Computer to assess the offending risk of groups of individuals compared with that for the general population.  Hazard rate curves were used to assess the risk over time of a subsequent conviction for individuals initially arrested or charged but not convicted of a Crime and Security Act (2010) qualifying offence.

The results suggest that the earliest the offending risk in the charged group falls to the level present in the comparable general population is just over three years after the initial charge.  Comparative analysis was also undertaken to explore the implications of different policy treatments. The study was undertaken to help improve understanding of the Scottish model of DNA profile retention.