Research and analysis

Bioaccumulation of chemicals in fish

This research considers three aspects of a new approach to analysing how chemicals build up in fish, known as bioaccumulation.

Documents

Bioaccumulation of chemicals in fish: investigating the relationship between depuration rate constant and fish lipid content - report

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Bioaccumulation of chemicals in fish: investigating the relationship between depuration rate constant and fish lipid content - summary

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Details

Bioaccumulation is an important piece of information in assessing the risk of chemicals and for regulatory regimes such as the European Union chemicals regulation REACH (the Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals).

When alternative means of getting information on bioaccumulation are not viable, fish are generally used as the key indicator for bioaccumulation in laboratory studies. Studies investigate how a chemical is taken up into fish during exposure, and how the chemical is lost from the fish when exposure ceases (depuration). Our understanding of the effect of different processes in such tests is regularly evolving and we need to update the way in which we interpret the information that is measured.

This research proposes a new laboratory method for measuring bioaccumulation in fish.

Published 24 October 2014