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Assistant Chief Constable Alan Cooper retires after 40 years’ in policing

The Civil Nuclear Constabulary's Assistant Chief Constable (ACC), Alan Cooper is retiring from policing after 40 years of service.

Civil Nuclear Constabulary’s Assistant Chief Constable (ACC), Alan Cooper is retiring from policing after 40 years of service.

After giving seven and a half years’ service as Assistant Chief Constable with the Constabulary, Alan will retire in April.

Alan joined the Civil Nuclear Constabulary in January 2008 as the CNC’s Assistant Chief Constable. He began his career as a Police Cadet and then PC with Merseyside Police and went on to become the head of CID for Liverpool South and a Chief Superintendent in Greater Manchester Police where he became the divisional commander for South Manchester.

At CNC he is the Chief Officer on all operational deployments, armed or otherwise, at civil nuclear sites in the UK and materials in transit. He is the strategic lead on intelligence, Special Branch and the Strategic Escort Group.

Chief Constable Mike Griffiths said: “On behalf of the many officers and police staff he has met along the way, I would like wish him the very best in his retirement.

“I would like to thank Alan for his dedication to the CNC during a period of unprecedented change. He has led on so many of the major improvement programmes that has taken the CNC forward into its new era and all of us within the Constabulary have significantly benefited from Alan’s wealth of experience and policing skills.”

CNPA Chairman Sir Philip Trousdell said: “Alan has served with the CNC during a period of enormous change; indeed he has been fundamental to the successful implementation of all aspects of that change.

“The Authority and the Constabulary have been the beneficiaries of his wide experience, common sense, enormous energy and strong leadership. I shall miss his sound advice and his good humour and I wish him every success in the future.”

Assistant Chief Constable Alan Cooper said: “After over seven years as the Civil Nuclear Constabulary’s ACC operations I have decided not to seek a further extension of my time in the post and will leave the constabulary, with some very fond memories, on 6 April.

“During my time in post I have received huge support from many of the officers and staff in the CNC. The CNC has grown rapidly over the previous seven years and this is thanks to so many people displaying huge dedication, drive and commitment to ensure that we deliver upon our mission.

“This year sees me reach forty years of police service having joined Merseyside as a police cadet in 1975. Many things in the police environment have changed in that time but the one thing that never will is the need to have dedicated, professional police officers and staff regularly displaying the most important quality of them all, common sense, more often in difficult operational situations.

“We are fortunate in the CNC to have a significant number of such individuals and I was very fortunate to lead them.”

A recruitment programme to find a successor is underway and an announcement on Alan’s successor will be made in due course.