Press release

A new era for Benson Weir

The Environment Agency has recently completed important maintenance and repair work on Benson Weir in South Oxfordshire.

The Environment Agency has recently completed important maintenance and repair work on Benson Weir. This is one of the oldest locks on the Thames which can be traced back to the 14th Century.

The weir is made up of both hand operated and mechanically operated weir gates and an overspill weir to control the level of water in the river.

Work on the site has recently been completed by a team of 5.

Barry Russell, Area Operational Manager, Environment Agency said:

Our role in ensuring that waterway structures remain in good working order is crucial for the success of the River Thames as a navigational waterway. The weir helps with the navigation of boats, reduces the rivers impact on ecology, helps with water abstraction, and also helps to manage flood risk.

Our repairs on Benson Weir have made it much safer and easier to use. Works included replacing a damaged A frame and refurbishing the walkway for river users.

Benson Weir and Lock history goes back into the late 1300s, when a mill and weir were recorded. It wasn’t until 1788 that the first timber lock was built and later converted to a stone lock in 1870.