Consultation outcome

The Housing Benefit (Habitual Residence) Amendment Regulations 2014: SSAC consultation

This consultation has concluded

Detail of outcome

Original consultation

This consultation ran from to

Summary

Consultation and a call for evidence about The Housing Benefit (Habitual Residence) Amendment Regulations 2014.

Documents

Letter to SSAC Secretary

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Equality Analysis

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Consultation description

Read the Secretary of State’s interim response to this consultation.

This consultation is part of the Social Security Advisory Committee’s (SSAC) consideration of The Housing Benefit (Habitual Residence) Amendment Regulations 2014.

SSAC wants to hear from those organisations or individuals who have evidence relating to the following issues:

  • what impact will the legislation have on new EEA migrants to the UK, or for existing EEA migrants who lose their employment and who do not have the status of a retained worker?
  • what impact will the removal of Housing Benefit have on the likelihood of EEA migrants coming to the UK as jobseekers?
  • is there any evidence that EEA migrants experience particular difficulties in establishing whether or not they have retained worker status for benefit purposes? If so, what are the key issues and will the position change as a consequence of this legislation?
  • local authorities are statutorily obliged to make help available under the Children Act 1989 and the National Assistance Act 1948 – how do you think the new regulations will affect the extent to which local authorities are currently required to make such an intervention, and the associated costs of doing so?
  • the Impact Assessment notes that:
    • 92% of those potentially affected by the policy are renting in the private rental sector
    • that a third of those potentially affected live in London – what are the potential consequences (in terms of impacts, costs and behaviours) of this from the perspectives of the individuals, local authorities and private landlords?

More information

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