Young Women’s Household Bargaining Power in Marriage and Parenthood in Ethiopia

This paper examines the factors that affect the bargaining power of young married women in marriage and parenthood

Abstract

This working paper examines the factors that affect the bargaining power of young married women in marriage and parenthood in Ethiopia, where power structures remain overwhelmingly male-dominated and patriarchal. It draws on longitudinal qualitative data and survey information collected by Young Lives with children, young people and their families between 2007 and 2015.

The paper’s main focus is young women’s changing relations and analysis of their ‘bargaining power’ before and after marriage. The concept of bargaining power has been used to understand gender inequality, primarily from the field of economics, but this mainly qualitative paper takes bargaining power to mean the negotiating capacity of young married women within their marital relationships and households.

Young Lives is an international study of childhood poverty, following the lives of 12,000 children in 4 countries (Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam) over 15 years. Young Lives is funded by the UK Department for International Development.

Citation

Chuta, Nardos (2017) Young Women’s Household Bargaining Power in Marriage and Parenthood in Ethiopia. Young Lives Working Paper 166. Oxford: Young Lives

Young Women’s Household Bargaining Power in Marriage and Parenthood in Ethiopia

Published 1 February 2017