Using gender analysis to build voluntary counselling and testing responses in Kenya

Abstract

The rapid expansion of voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa has led to concerns over the quality and equity of the services. Kenya has seen an unprecedented scale-up of VCT, and valuable lessons have been learnt at national as well as at district and community levels. We combined quantitative and qualitative research methodology and showed how the results of gender analysis can be used to develop equity in VCT scale-up. A gender-disaggregated analysis of VCT client data was conducted for the first 8 months of 2003. These quantitative data revealed that despite an increased vulnerability to HIV, women are underrepresented in VCT sites in all settings in Kenya. Our data also showed that women were also less likely to use condoms or to take home condoms after a VCT visit than their male counterparts. Further exploration through in-depth qualitative work with women and men allowed a better understanding of the reasons behind gender differences in Kenyan VCT sites and helped to develop strategies to address gender inequity. We conclude that there is an ongoing need to mainstream gender in monitoring and evaluation strategies to ensure services meet the needs and priorities of all groups.

Citation

Taegtmeyer, M.; Kilonzo, N.; Mung’ala, L.; Morgan, G.; Theobald, S. Using gender analysis to build voluntary counselling and testing responses in Kenya. Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (2006) 100 (4) 305-311. [DOI: 10.1016/j.trstmh.2005.06.001]

Using gender analysis to build voluntary counselling and testing responses in Kenya

Help us improve GOV.UK

Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.