Using a discrete choice experiment to elicit the demand for a nutritious food: Willingness-to-pay for orange maize in rural Zambia

Abstract

Using a discrete choice experiment, this paper estimates the willingness to pay for biofortified orange maize in rural Zambia. The study design has five treatment arms, which enable an analysis of the impact of nutrition information, comparing the use of simulated radio versus community leaders in transmitting the nutrition message, on willingness to pay, and to account for possible novelty effects in the magnitude of premiums or discounts. The estimation strategy also takes into account lexicographic preferences of a subset of our respondents. The results suggest that (a) orange maize is not confused with yellow maize, and has the potential to compete with white maize in the absence of a nutrition campaign, (b) there is a premium for orange maize with nutrition information, and (c) different modes of nutritional message dissemination have the same impact on consumer acceptance.

Citation

Meenakshi, J.V.; Banerji, A.; Manyong, V.; Tomlins, K.; Mittal, N.; Hamukwala, P. Using a discrete choice experiment to elicit the demand for a nutritious food: Willingness-to-pay for orange maize in rural Zambia. Journal of Health Economics (2012) 31 (1) 62-71. [DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2012.01.002]

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