Use of antenatal services and delivery care in Entebbe, Uganda: a community survey.

Abstract

Background: Disparities in perinatal health care occur worldwide. If the UN Millennium Development Goals in maternal and child health are to be met, this needs to be addressed. This study was conducted to facilitate our understanding of the changing use of maternity care services in a semi-urban community in Entebbe, Uganda, and to examine the range of antenatal and delivery services received in health care facilities and at home. Methods: We conducted a retrospective community survey among women using structured questionnaires to describe the use of antenatal services and delivery care. Results: In total 413 women reported on their most recent pregnancy. Antenatal care attendance was high with 96% attending once, and 69% the recommended four times. Blood pressure monitoring (95%) and tetanus vaccination (91%) were the services most frequently reported and HIV testing (47%), haematinics (58%) and presumptive treatment for malaria (66%) least frequently. Hospital clinics significantly outperformed public clinics in the quality of antenatal service. A significant improvement in the reported quality of antenatal services received was observed by year (p

Citation

BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth (2007) 7 (23) [doi:10.1186/1471-2393-7-23]

Use of antenatal services and delivery care in Entebbe, Uganda: a community survey.

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