Trait patterns of mungbean, black gram and rice bean

Food legumes like mungbean, black gram and rice bean have potential to diversify diets and agro-ecosystems of the tropics

Abstract

Food legumes like mungbean, black gram and rice bean have potential to diversify diets and agro-ecosystems of the tropics. Access to genetic diversity and phenotypic data are key issues for crop improvement. Large germplasm collections like the one at the World Vegetable Center may be used in detecting trait relationships and to identify accessions of interest for breeding. The current study provides results of more than 30 years of field characterization, including 9 numeric and 15 categorical descriptors and more than 10,000 accessions or sub-accessions. Core collections were established in black gram and rice bean. A positive correlation was detected between yield components such as seed size and pod length, and between these yield components and less desirable traits such as plant height and late maturity. High within-accession diversity was identified in several of the accessions.

This article is the result of funding from the World Vegetable Center. The World Vegetable Center is partly funded by the UK Department for International Development

Citation

Chang, C.H.; Chou, Y.Y.; Yndgaard, F.; Solberg, S.Ø. 2017. Trait patterns of mungbean, black gram and rice bean. Legume Research. DOI: 10.18805/LR-378

Trait patterns of mungbean, black gram and rice bean

Published 1 September 2017