Training traditional birth attendants in clean delivery does not prevent postpartum infection.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare the maternal outcome, in terms of postpartum infection, of deliveries conducted by trained traditional birth attendants (TBAs) with those conducted by untrained birth attendants.

The study took place in a rural area of Bangladesh where a local NGO (BRAC) had previously undertaken TBA training. Demographic surveillance in the study site allowed the systematic identification of pregnant women. Pregnant women were recruited continuously over a period of 18 months. Data on the delivery circumstances were collected shortly after delivery while data on postpartum morbidity were collected prospectively at 2 and 6 weeks. All women with complete records who had delivered at home with a non-formal birth attendant (800) were included in the analysis. The intervention investigated was TBA training in hygienic delivery comprising the ‘three cleans’ (hand-washing with soap, clean cord care, clean surface). The key outcome measure was maternal postpartum genital tract infection diagnosed by a symptom complex of any two out of three symptoms: foul discharge, fever, lower abdominal pain.

Citation

Goodburn, E.A.; Chowdhury, M; Gazi, R.; Marshall, T.; Graham, W. Training traditional birth attendants in clean delivery does not prevent postpartum infection. Health Policy and Planning (2000) 15 (4) 394-399. [DOI: 10.1093/heapol/15.4.394]

Training traditional birth attendants in clean delivery does not prevent postpartum infection.

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