The Gender and Social Dimensions to Livestock Keeping in South Asia: Implications for Animal Health Interventions

Livestock on small farms are often managed by women, but technical training and vaccines are targeted to men

Abstract

Livestock on small scale farms in South Asia are often managed by women, but technical training and inputs like vaccines are usually targeted to men only. This limits the health and productivity of the animals, and does not address women’s low social status, and its drag on the entire economy. Gender mainstreaming of animal health care to benefit women and the animals they care for will raise their status and in turn improve food security and the welfare of the entire family and the community.

This is an output from the ‘Global Alliance For Livestock Veterinary Medicines (GALVmed): Phase 2 – Protecting Livestock and Saving Human Lives’ programme

Citation

Miller, B.A. The Gender and Social Dimensions to Livestock Keeping in South Asia:Implications for Animal Health Interventions. (2011) 48 pp.

The Gender and Social Dimensions to Livestock Keeping in South Asia: Implications for Animal Health Interventions

Published 1 January 2011