The efficacy of women’s social movements to include chronically poor women and give voice to their demands. A literature review. CPRC Working Paper 171.

Abstract

Social movements are known to struggle to include, or be representative of, chronically poor women. The objective of this review and annotated bibliography is to examine social movements within and across various strata of society (i.e. not only the chronically poor; and case studies that include men and women), in order to identify the key features that may facilitate or limit the ability of social movement organisations (SMOs) to be inclusive of the chronically poor and give voice to their demands.

In the literature review, the key findings are presented as a set of six strategies for social movement organisations. Over the course of five chapters, evidence is presented which supports and contests these strategies.

  • Ultimately, the review reveals that social movement organisations are said to be more able to engage in collective action that is inclusive of chronically women when they:
  • promote inclusive organisational structures, including new, accountable leadership opportunities;
  • promote a unified group identity; and
  • effectively address the constraints on chronically poor women’s participation through the delivery of key resources, such as basic needs that address asset and time poverty.

SMOs will best be able to promote and represent the voice of chronically poor women when they:

  • prioritise awareness raising and information dissemination on rights and entitlements to their membership and to wider society;
  • manage equitable relations with external agents, including donor bodies; and
  •  engage with the state in meaningful and innovative ways.

The literature review is followed by a selected annotated bibliography (Working Paper 172) of the supporting readings, which draw upon social movement, feminist, collective action and gendered chronic poverty literature.

Citation

Amosu, R. The efficacy of women’s social movements to include chronically poor women and give voice to their demands. A literature review. CPRC Working Paper 171. Chronic Poverty Research Centre, London, UK (2011) 46 pp. ISBN 978-1-906433-73-4

The efficacy of women’s social movements to include chronically poor women and give voice to their demands. A literature review. CPRC Working Paper 171.

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