The cost-effectiveness of improving malaria home management: shopkeeper training in rural Kenya

Abstract

Home management is a very common approach to the treatment of illnesses such as malaria, acute respiratory infections, tuberculosis, diarrhoea and sexually transmitted infections, frequently through over-the-counter purchase of drugs from shops. Inappropriate drugs and doses are often obtained, but interventions to improve treatment quality are rare. An educational programme for general shopkeepers and communities in Kilifi District, rural Kenya was associated with major improvements in the use of over-the-counter anti-malarial drugs for childhood fevers. The two main components were workshop training for drug retailers and community information activities, with impact maintained through on-going refresher training, monitoring and community mobilization. This paper presents the cost and cost-effectiveness of the programme in terms of additional appropriately treated cases, evaluating both its measured cost-effectiveness in the first area of implementation (early implementation phase) and the estimated cost-effectiveness of the programme recommended for district-level implementation (recommended district programme).

Citation

Health Policy and Planning (2006) 21 (4) 275-288

The cost-effectiveness of improving malaria home management: shopkeeper training in rural Kenya

Help us improve GOV.UK

Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.