The consequences of severe obstetric complications in Burkina Faso and Benin.

Abstract

This briefing paper describes the experiences of women who have suffered from severe obstetric complications in Burkina Faso and Benin. The key findings are that: infants born to women with severe obstetric complications are more likely to die after hospital discharge up to a year after birth; women who initially survive severe obstetric complications are also more likely to die from related causes; near miss women who experience a pregnancy loss or whose babies die are at greater risk of mental health problems, marital problems and spousal abuse; the financial burden of hospital care sometimes reinforces a cycle of debt, and can be an important factor contributing to women’s risk of depression; use of postnatal services is higher amongst women who have experienced an obstetric complication, but due to cost constraints there is still an unmet need for care; and overall, women who survive complications are disproportionately vulnerable and dedicated efforts must be made to address their needs and those of their infants.

Citation

Towards 4+5 Briefing Paper 3, April 2009; 4 pp.

The consequences of severe obstetric complications in Burkina Faso and Benin.

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