Targeting groups at risk of extremism through security and justice programming (GSDRC Helpdesk Research Report 1166)

Abstract

Query

What evidence is there that security and justice programming (by DFID or other donors) targets specific groups (populations and victims) at risk of extremism and how has the impact been measured?

Overview

Since 11 September 2001, and the attacks on key locations in the US, the understanding of, and focus on, ‘violent extremism’ (VE) has changed significantly. While definitions and type of policy approaches vary according to donors, these initiatives are broadly understood within an emerging literature base of ’countering violent extremism’ (CVE), defined as aiming ‘to prevent radicalization and recruitment to terrorism by strengthening the resilience of individuals and communities against the appeal of violent extremism’. Such approaches can also be called counter-radicalisation, de-radicalisation, or counterterrorism.

This rapid literature review focusses on CVE initiatives that form part of donors’ security and justice programming in developing countries, according to DFID’s definition of security and justice. It collates evidence about whether donors are identifying specific groups at risk to target these CVE initiatives, or whether donors are providing CVE initiatives more broadly. It also collates evidence on how to measure the impact of these programmes.

Citation

Herbert, S. Targeting groups at risk of extremism through security and justice programming (GSDRC Helpdesk Research Report 1166). Governance and Social Development Resource Centre, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK (2014) 11 pp.

Targeting groups at risk of extremism through security and justice programming (GSDRC Helpdesk Research Report 1166)

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