Tablets are more acceptable and give fewer problems than syrups among young HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings in the ARROW trial.

Abstract

Of 406 HIV-infected Ugandan and Zimbabwean children aged 3 months to 17 years administered antiretroviral drugs in syrup form when enrolled in the ARROW trial during 2007-2008, 236 were switched to tablets between May 2008 and December 2009 (this was encouraged for children around 3 years of age). Questionnaires were administered to the children's carers at the time of substitution and again 8 weeks later; 186 pairs of questionniares were analysed. It was found that carers anticipated fewer difficulties using tablets than syrups, and experienced even fewer; most children and almost all carers preferred tablets.

Citation

Nahirya-Ntege, P.; Bwakura-Dangarembizi, M.F.; Byaruhanga, J.; Cook, A.; Bakeera-Kitaka, S.; Keishanyu, R.; Mudzingwa, S.; Nabulime, G.; Kekitiinwa, A.; Spyer, M.; Nankya, F.; Nathoo, K.; Tezikyabbiri, J.; Kasirye, P.; Gibb, D.M. Tablets are more acceptable and give fewer problems than syrups among young HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings in the ARROW trial. Presented at 2nd International Workshop on HIV Paediatrics, Vienna, Austria, 16-17 July 2010 and XVIII International AIDS Conference, Vienna, Austria, 18-23 July 2010. (2010)

Tablets are more acceptable and give fewer problems than syrups among young HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings in the ARROW trial.

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