Supporting Infrastructure Development in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States: Learning from Experience

This study examines the evidence on the experience of international support to improve infrastructure in fragile and conflict-affected contexts

Abstract

The study draws on a literature review and case studies. It focuses on infrastructure programmes in Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Nepal and South Sudan supported by the Department for International Development

The study identifies the main causal relationships by which infrastructure programmes may contribute to economic growth, poverty reduction and improved access to services, as well as their relationship to processes of stabilisation, peacebuilding and state-building. Although the evidence base is in many areas weak, some clear conclusions emerge about the strengths and weaknesses of past engagement, and lessons for the design and implementation of more effective infrastructure programmes.

A related Supporting infrastructure development in fragile and conflict-affected states: annotated bibliography update was published in May 2016. It identifies the evidence and lessons of the impacts (positive and negative), between infrastructure, fragility and conflict since the 2012 ‘Supporting Infrastructure Development in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States: Learning from Experience’ paper. It includes literature specifically relating to urban areas. The update to the Annotated Bibliography found 72 additional sources since the initial survey was completed in 2012.

Citation

Jones, S; Howarth, S. Supporting infrastructure development in fragile and conflict-affected states: Learning from experience. Oxford Policy Management, Oxford (2012), ix, 56p

Supporting Infrastructure Development in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States: Learning from Experience

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