Salmonella and Vibrio cholerae in brackish-water cultured tropical prawns

Abstract

The occurrence of Salmonella and Vibrio cholerae in brackishwater ponds was monitored over a 2-year period in one of the major prawn exporting countries in Southeast Asia. The principal production areas were identified and regular samples taken for Salmonella and V. cholerae analysis. Results demonstrated that brackishwater ponds and cultured prawns were inherently contaminated with both bacterial pathogens. Salmonella spp. were present in 16.0% of prawns and 22.1% of mud/water samples from ponds; and V. cholerae present in 1.5% of prawns and 3.1% of mud/water samples. Culturing by intensive methods tended to favour contamination by these pathogens, which is most likely due to the accumulation of waste and increase in the volume of sediments in ponds. Typical environmental factors such as water temperature, pH, and salinity were all favourable for growth of microorganisms. The incidence of the pathogens increased during the wet season and was marginally higher when ponds were located close to urban areas. S. weltevreden was identified as the principal serotype found in ponds, and to a lesser extent S. anatum (11%) S. wandsworth (8%) and S. potsdam (8%). The V. cholerae belonged to the non-O1 serogroup.

Citation

Reilly, P.J.A.; Twiddy, D.R. Salmonella and Vibrio cholerae in brackishwater cultured tropical prawns. International Journal of Food Microbiology (1992) 16 (4) 293-301. [DOI: 10.1016/0168-1605(92)90031-W]

Salmonella and Vibrio cholerae in brackish-water cultured tropical prawns

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