Road Traffic Injury on Rural Roads in Tanzania: A study to determine the causes and circumstances of motorcycle crashes on low-volume rural roads

Abstract

By 2030, road traffic injury (RTI) is forecast to be the fifth largest killer worldwide. Sub-Saharan Africa has the world's most dangerous roads, and rates of RTI are increasing as roads are built and more vehicles are present. Motorcycles, which are revolutionising rural access in many countries including Tanzania, have a very high RTI rate. Through detailed crash investigations, risk assessments, interviews and inspections, this research aimed to determine the causes and circumstances of motorcycle crashes on low-volume rural roads in Tanzania, to inform the development of targeted road safety policies and interventions.

This report identifies that motorcycle crashes on rural roads can be attributed to numerous factors, including those related to human behaviour and road design and condition. Improving road safety requires coordinated efforts between policy-makers, engineers, police, community organisations and others. The report makes practical recommendations for road safety stakeholders to improve the safety of low-volume rural roads for motorcycles and other users.

Citation

Bishop, T.; Deepani Jinadasa. Road Traffic Injury on Rural Roads in Tanzania: A study to determine the causes and circumstances of motorcycle crashes on low-volume rural roads. (2014) 109 pp.

Road Traffic Injury on Rural Roads in Tanzania: A study to determine the causes and circumstances of motorcycle crashes on low-volume rural roads

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