Rights and citizenship of indigenous women in Chiapas: a history of struggles, fears and hopes

Abstract

The Zapatista rebellion began in 1994 in the state of Chiapas in the south of Mexico, and called into question social practices and government policies, as well as the basic premises of the neo-liberal model. At the same time as it challenged the position of indigenous people as citizens in Mexico, the rebellion gave momentum to an indigenous women’s movement that is demanding respect for the rights and dignity of indigenous women and for new forms of sovereignty. This chapter discusses how this movement has led to changes in the lives of indigenous women in Chiapas. Drawing on the daily experiences of women, it identifies the fundamental elements of the struggles that motivate them. It also explores the fears that these women have had to overcome, and the hopes that maintain their struggle. The changes that are emerging as a result of this movement are complex, and are deepening as they are perpetuated across a range of experiences.

Owing to copyright restrictions, only the first 3 pages are attached, together with a link to the book at Zed Books.

Citation

Cortez Ruiz, C. Rights and citizenship of indigenous women in Chiapas: a history of struggles, fears and hopes. In: Inclusive Citizenship: Meanings and Expressions. N Kabeer (ed.). Zed Books, London, UK (2005) ISBN 9781842775486

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