Review of the non-structural considerations for seismically retrofitting hospitals, impact on hospital functionality, and hospital selection

Abstract

For many years the design and assessment of structural components and systems was the focus of most seismic codes worldwide. Although this focus remains dominant, experience in recent earthquakes has shown that damage to nonstructural components is also of great concern. A nonstructural component is any architectural element; mechanical, electrical, plumbing (MEP) equipment or systems or part thereof; or any furniture, fixtures, equipment (FF&E) or building contents. This term is used to describe any and all components of a building structure which are not an explicit part of the structural system.

Previous studies by FEMA have shown that nonstructural components constitute a major investment in most buildings; therefore, the failures of these elements may be both dangerous and costly. In fact, the failure of nonstructural components during seismic events may result in injuries or fatalities; cause costly damage to buildings and their contents; and force the closure of residential, medical and manufacturing facilities, businesses, and government offices until appropriate repairs are completed. To quantify the potential consequences of earthquake damage to nonstructural components, three types of risk can be typically considered:

  • Life Safety (LS): Could anyone be hurt by this component in an earthquake?
  • Property Loss (PL): Could a large property loss result?
  • Functional Loss (FL): Could the loss of this component cause an outage or interruption?

Following the introduction and background, section 2 of this report considers the key nonstructural components for non-specialist buildings and hospitals; section 3 looks at the seismic vulnerability of nonstructural components in hospitals; section 4 discusses retrofitting strategies for nonstructural factors; and section 5 looks at the prioritisation strategies for retrofitting (benefit-cost analysis and multi-criteria decision making).

This report has been produced for Evidence on Demand with the assistance of the UK Department for International Development (DFID) contracted through the Climate, Environment, Infrastructure and Livelihoods Professional Evidence and Applied Knowledge Services (CEIL PEAKS) programme, jointly managed by DAI (which incorporates HTSPE Limited) and IMC Worldwide Limited.

Citation

D’Ayala, D.; Galasso, C.; Minas, S.; Novelli, V. Review of the non-structural considerations for seismically retrofitting hospitals, impact on hospital functionality, and hospital selection. Evidence on Demand, UK (2015) ii + 26 pp. [DOI: 10.12774/eod_hd.june2015.ddayalaetal2]

Review of the non-structural considerations for seismically retrofitting hospitals, impact on hospital functionality, and hospital selection

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