Responses of tsetse to ox sebum: a video study in the field

Abstract

The behaviour of tsetse (mainly Glossina pallidipes Austen) around odour-baited targets, with or without a coating of ox sebum, was recorded in the field using video. The addition of sebum increased the total time a fly was in contact with the target, as well as the time spent flying around and landing on it. When carbon dioxide was released as part of the attractant odour plume, the presence of sebum on the target increased the number of landings made by each fly, but did not significantly affect the duration of each contact. When carbon dioxide was absent from the odour plume, sebum did not affect the number of landings made by flies but the duration of each contact with the target did increase. Evidence for an interactive effect of sebum and carbon dioxide was obtained. In addition, the presence of sebum on the target increased the percentage of landed flies which walked on its surface; such behaviour may represent an ‘inspection’ of the artificial host. The potential tsetse control application of the current findings are discussed.

Citation

Packer, M.J.; Warnes, M.L. Responses of tsetse to ox sebum: a video study in the field. Medical and Veterinary Entomology (1991) 5 (1) 23-27. [DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2915.1991.tb00516.x]

Responses of tsetse to ox sebum: a video study in the field

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