Research makes the news. Strengthening media engagement with research to influence policy

This paper uses 4 case studies from Jamaica and Uganda

Abstract

This paper uses 4 case studies from Jamaica and Uganda:

  • Working conditions in Jamaica among women in wholesale outlets

  • Early childhood development in Jamaica

  • Uganda and the scourge of buveera

  • The ‘Save Mabira’ campaign, Uganda

The authors look at the multiple factors that shape the media’s role in reporting on research and generating public debate around research and evidence - and its capacity to influence policy as a result. It finds that journalists, researchers and civil society activists all play important roles in this process.

The paper also finds that a key factor driving media capacity to influence policy is the strength of the relationships among the different actors - journalists, civil society activists and researchers - as well as the degree of openness and trust among them and the political context in which they are operating.

Research makes the news recommends that stronger links and relationships between different groups should be supported, as should developing the capacity of researchers and journalists to work with each other. This will increase the likelihood of research being taken up in policy processes.

Citation

Carpenter, J.; Yngstrom, I. Research makes the news. Strengthening media engagement with research to influence policy. Panos London, London, UK (2010) 18 pp.

Research makes the news. Strengthening media engagement with research to influence policy.

Published 1 January 2010