Pump-Priming Payments for Sustainable Water Services in Rural Africa

Abstract

Locally managed handpumps provide water services to around 200 million people in rural Africa. Handpump failures often result in extended service disruption leading to high but avoidable financial, health, and development costs. Using unique observational data from monitoring handpump usage in rural Kenya, this study evaluates how dramatic improvements in maintenance services influence payment preferences across institutional, operational, and geographic factors. Public goods theory is applied to examine new institutional forms of handpump management. Results reveal steps to enhance rural water supply sustainability by pooling maintenance and financial risks at scale supported by advances in monitoring and payment technologies.

Citation

Koehler, J.; Thomson, P.; Hope, R. Pump-Priming Payments for Sustainable Water Services in Rural Africa. World Development (2015) 74: 397-411. [DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2015.05.020]

Pump-Priming Payments for Sustainable Water Services in Rural Africa

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